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kari
05-20-2014, 04:40 AM
http://i.imgur.com/LTnsQZH.gif


Soylent is an open sourced food substitute intended to supply all of a human body's daily nutritional needs, made from maltodextrin, rice protein, oat flour, canola oil, fish oil, and raw chemical powders.
Soylent was created by software engineer Rob Rhinehart; it is intended to supply all the nutrients needed by the human body without the time, money, and effort that usually goes into preparing food.

Has anyone tried it? Does anyone want to try it?


If you're from the US (-_-) then you can order it here:
http://soylent.me/

If you're from any other sane part of the world then there's DIY soylent recipes online:
http://diy.soylent.me/

Here is a site that is critical of soylent:
http://examine.com/blog/soylent-is-made-from-hype/

apparently it makes you fart a lot.

pensive_pilgrim
05-20-2014, 05:13 AM
I sat through a presentation somebody gave at an open source seminar a few weeks ago. It sounded like an interesting concept. It seems like the real benefit is being able to rigidly control your own nutritional intake. I wouldn't mind trying it sometime but right now I don't have the time and money to invest - the stuff at the US website is significantly more expensive than what I normally eat(they're seriously trying to tout $4 for 500 calories as economically efficient?), and if I wanted to make my own(which I would anyway - the stuff they sell is way too high in carbohydrate and low in protein) then there's the time necessary to research and purchase the separate ingredients and mix them together. I also wouldn't see the point of doing it unless I was going to substitute it for all of my meals.

Still, it seems like a really interesting concept that I'd love to see developed more and would like to try at some point.

Fitz
05-20-2014, 05:17 AM
I'll pass. I don't hate myself that much, yet.

MarkovChain
05-20-2014, 06:11 AM
This reminds me of this one guy who tried to eat nothing but Monkey food for a week. Supposedly monkey food contains all the nutrients that a monkey or great ape needs.

http://thefoodmonkey.com/graphics/monkeychow.jpg

http://www.weightlossforall.com/monkey-chow-diet-adam-scott-you-slay-me.htm

Thevenin
05-20-2014, 11:18 AM
...It seems like the real benefit is being able to rigidly control your own nutritional intake...

The optimum diet for humans is still unknown (if it's even knowable).

OTOH, despite all the diverse opinions, strongly held, by so many "experts," the extreme diversity of diets that have allowed different cultures to survive may be evidence that there is no such thing as a "perfect diet." We're probably just efficient digestion machines that make the best of whatever we stuff down our gullets (including junk food), regardless of the long-term health consequences.

I do agree that this "stuff they sell is way too high in carbohydrate and low in protein"--particularly if you're trying to grow and maintain muscle mass.

Lurker
05-20-2014, 01:44 PM
Enjoying tasty food is one of life's simple pleasures; I would try Soylent just to see what it's all about, but I doubt it's something I could maintain long-term.

I'm reminded of this:

http://media.avclub.com/images/articles/article/2257/IMG_0108_jpg_627x325_crop_upscale_q85.jpg

Nutraloaf, aka Prison Loaf.


Nutraloaf, a thick orange lump of spite with the density and taste of a dumbbell, could only be the object of Beelzebub’s culinary desires. Packed with protein, fat, carbohydrates, and 1,110 calories, Nutraloaf contains everything from carrots and cabbage to kidney beans and potatoes, plus shadowy ingredients such as “dairy blend” and “mechanically separated poultry.” You purée everything into a paste, shape it into a loaf, and bake it for 50 to 70 minutes at 375 degrees. Eat two a day and, boom, all your daily nutrients, right there. If you want the recipe, ask me.
http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/September-2010/Dining-Critic-Tries-Nutraloaf-the-Prison-Food-for-Misbehaving-Inmates/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutraloaf

Sadistic.

Senseye
05-20-2014, 02:20 PM
It looks appallingly awful. Sort of like brown slime. And I'm sure it tastes that way.

I suppose I'd eat it out of necessity in some sort of semi post-apocalyptic world where global warming or whatnot has seriously impacted the food supply. And at that point, they might as well grind up people in there too. I can't really see myself fussing over exactly what's in my "brown slime" other than knowing it's nutritionally complete.

msg_v2
05-20-2014, 02:41 PM
I think the name is a major marketing fail.

That being said, there are many times where I don't wish to spend a lot of effort acquiring food, and merely want to satisfy my bodily needs. Something like that could work if it doesn't taste too terrible.

skip
05-20-2014, 03:20 PM
The problem with that is nutritional intake has to be adjusted to your activities and body type. The diet I eat when I'm doing long distance hiking is very different from my usual day-to-day diet which is very different from what I eat when I'm in the weight-gaining phase of triathlon training. Also, I'm a rather athletic endomorph. I can't eat what my sedentary ectomorph friend eats. Let's not forget age plays a factor, too. I can't eat what I did at 19, and I doubt I'll be eating what I eat now when I'm 72. Bodies and lifestyles are too different for there to be a one-size-fits-all nutrition plan.

Also, don't you (you in general, not anyone specific) enjoy eating good food? Eating well is one of the more sublime pleasures in life, a reward for inhabiting these rather troublesome bodies. I understand it takes time/effort/money to sit down to a wonderful meal but I'd still hate to give all that up.

mondschein
05-21-2014, 12:36 AM
I hate the idea because it deviates too much from a "natural" diet, but I wouldn't mind adding a couple of spoons to my morning smoothie.

LordLatch
05-21-2014, 01:38 AM
Looks like it'll keep you alive but I bet you'll wish you were dead.

What is the secret of Soylent Green?

Hephaestus
05-21-2014, 04:43 AM
Nutraloaf, aka Prison Loaf.

I suspect this doesn't change in appearance as it traverses the digestive tract. Or texture.

LordLatch
05-21-2014, 04:57 AM
I suspect this doesn't change in appearance as it traverses the digestive tract. Or texture.

We will count on your research to verify this. No need to post pictures.

Starjots
05-22-2014, 04:00 PM
My wife is a good cook but I'm a self-feeder much of the time, scavenging whatever is easiest. I have been planning to try this out for some time, mostly to replace my graze feed. I do enjoy a good meal to be sure - but not every meal has to be a good meal. Also, most convenience food is crap.

I'd be leery of going 100% for any extended period of time on this. I wouldn't be too worried though if I added a good salad every day.

stuck
05-22-2014, 05:05 PM
1. Meal replacement has been around forever
2. This stuff isn't cheap
3. No goddamn fiber
4. Too much processing to be ecologically viable outside of truly horrifying apocalyptic scenarios. They're essentially growing the rice, corn, oats, fish, whatever else, transporting it, throwing away the majority, and taking a markup as they turn it into a paste.

To me, this doesn't beat economy foods like:

Beans
Eggs
Rice
Bananas
Apples
Peanut Butter
Milk
Butter
Onions
Broccoli
etc. etc. etc.

Minimally processed food is cheaper.

The only reasonable use of soylent would be to ship tankers of this to famine-stricken countries, to reduce shipping costs. Even then, someone would have to do some awesome math to figure out if the extra processing on each calorie is worth it.

This is a perfect storm of Ted Talk-damaged future-optimist capitalism, autistic nutrition, and kickstartery half-truths.

Starjots
05-22-2014, 05:43 PM
I'll claim autistic nutrition and try some anyway.

Feeding everyone is a big deal, right after getting clean water to drink. There are choices to eat healthy but it isn't default supermarket fare and certainly not default fast food fare. A lot of that is pumped up with corn/soybean/dairy filler or tortured anti-biotic filled animals.

So one can eat rice and beans cooked from scratch. We do that sort of thing for supper. Like I said my wife is a good cook and she's allergic to soy so that cuts out 80% of what the store sells.

But I still eat a lot of crap on my own, mea culpa - I could give a shit about cooking food. From the time I feel hungry to the time I finish eating something is about three minutes. So I figure it's worth an experimental try to replace the quick and easy.

Thevenin
05-22-2014, 05:53 PM
We do a lot of cooking and we eat well--we hardly eat out except when we travel. Food is an important part of life. Regarding this soylent sludge, I bet it's missing a lot of important micronutrients we don't even know about that we get from real food. So, the bottom line is, who would want to eat this crap?

stuck
05-22-2014, 06:15 PM
There are choices to eat healthy but it isn't default supermarket fare

It is absolutely default supermarket fare, especially if you want to stick close to the vegan components of soylent.

Oats are cheap and extremely easy to cook, less than three minutes in the nuke. Frozen veggies and berries are cheap and nutritious. A bunch of bananas is cheap.

And "filler"- that's ironic, considering that the maltodextrin in soylent- the very first ingredient- is probably made the way that most maltodextrin is made, by boiling the living fuck out of potatoes and corn. Maybe we should just eat the corn and potatoes. Frozen corn is none too hard to prepare, likewise with potatoes. Both are cheap.

This site:

http://www.whfoods.com/index.php

is probably the best one on the internet for evaluating foods.

Look at peas!

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=55

stuck
05-22-2014, 06:22 PM
Let's take the fish oil part of soylent.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12848287

"Net increments of EPA and DHA in plasma lipids were linearly and significantly correlated with the dose after capsule administration. Further, increments in plasma EPA and DHA concentration after salmon intake were significantly higher than after administration of capsules. The same increments would be obtained with at least two- and ninefold higher doses of EPA and DHA, respectively, if administered with capsules rather than salmon. "

Meaning- eating the unprocessed fish is significantly better for you than the oil.

If you want to get yet more eco-friendly about your fish (as it would stand to reason that less processing is generally less energy intensive and therefore better for the environment), eat smaller, oilier fish.

jigglypuff
05-22-2014, 06:50 PM
something like that could be appealing as a supplement? but not as a main food source cuz there's no room for diversity of lifestyles that require different nutritional needs... i probably don't have the same needs as an athlete or somebody who lives in front of a computer as a software engineer, etc.

it's good for people who don't enjoy eating, maybe, but i wouldn't remove the cultures, tastes & experiences of food from my life. that's boring

msg_v2
05-22-2014, 06:54 PM
This is a perfect storm of Ted Talk-damaged future-optimist capitalism, autistic nutrition, and kickstartery half-truths.

Hi, I'm Todd. I'm an autist. I want eat gruel because math!!!!! Nom 110000 Nom 110000 nom 11000!

Eat enough gruel, then advance to next level and acquire babes!!!

pensive_pilgrim
05-22-2014, 07:12 PM
I would like to see a machine where you could program in the specific amounts of each nutrient you wanted, store several default options depending on planned activity level, mood, activity type, etc. and choose a flavor and then push a button and have your meal mixed and blended and poured into a cup. Maybe I should make that.

jigglypuff
05-22-2014, 07:26 PM
sounds like something for a futuristic hospital

Senseye
05-22-2014, 07:56 PM
I would like to see a machine where you could program in the specific amounts of each nutrient you wanted, store several default options depending on planned activity level, mood, activity type, etc. and choose a flavor and then push a button and have your meal mixed and blended and poured into a cup. Maybe I should make that.So instead of "Tea. Earl Grey. Hot" it would be "Tea. Earl Grey. Hot & Nutritious"!

Hephaestus
05-22-2014, 08:14 PM
"Tea. Earl Grey. Hot." always implied something terrifying to me: "Tea. Earl Grey. Cold." Gross. Just, gross.

msg_v2
05-22-2014, 09:14 PM
Iced tea is gross?

Hephaestus
05-22-2014, 09:22 PM
Depends on the tea.

skip
05-23-2014, 02:24 AM
Janeway never had to tell her replicator to make her coffee hot.

Fitz
05-23-2014, 02:29 AM
Couldn't they have just set up the computer to where saying <food item> + hot or <food item> + cold simply alters the state of the standard temperature within a given range?

stuck
05-23-2014, 02:35 AM
That's
Going
Too
Far

Sappho
05-31-2014, 07:32 PM
...food (...) intended to supply all of a human body's daily nutritional needs...

http://www.kochkurse.at/images/braten.jpg

Hephaestus
08-12-2014, 04:53 AM
Less than a month after starting this thread... kali vanished into the shadows once more. Coincidence?

Hope so.

Bartender
08-12-2014, 12:49 PM
I bought soylent green crackers from a gag website once. Was funny sitting in the cafe eatting them with my friends. Pretty good 2.