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msg_v2
07-06-2014, 07:42 PM
Do you crave capsaicin? Do you pine for pepper?

Faust
07-06-2014, 07:51 PM
I lust for spice.

sandwitch
07-06-2014, 08:44 PM
The spice must flow.

Osito Polar
07-06-2014, 09:32 PM
Sometimes I bring my own hot sauce to Mexican restaurants.

rhinosaur
07-06-2014, 09:44 PM
My favorite hot sauce:
http://www.mariesharp.com/

last_caress
07-06-2014, 09:52 PM
I put hot sauce or leftover thai spice in my pasta sauce. I've done it so much it tastes bland without it.

Madrigal
07-07-2014, 12:59 AM
We don't really do picante unless you go further north. I like very spicy things but most people here find even moderately spicy foods inedible.

jigglypuff
07-07-2014, 01:33 AM
around here i think i'd starve if i didn't like it.

jyng1
07-07-2014, 07:28 AM
I spent a couple of weeks in some Brunei Barracks eating little fish heads and rice. Just about starved to death. Even the Singaporeans we were with were complaining about how hot the food was.

Normally I quite like a little spice, but I'm not a fan when it burns at both ends.

Lilith
07-07-2014, 08:01 AM
I normally like spicy food. Spices are abundant in Asian cuisines of which I'm accustomed to. I crave for them. Just the other week, we went to a Japanese restaurant in the local area just to satisfy my need to taste wasabi/soy sauce mix in my mouth.

But so far, the spiciest thing I've ever tasted is the appetizer palapa (http://maranaorecipe.blogspot.com/search/label/PALAPA) of the Meranaos way further south of the Philippines. Just ginger and chili pepper (specifically bird's eye chilies). It's crazy.

jamesgold
07-07-2014, 08:17 AM
I like things a little spicy. I like the acidity of hot sauce more than the heat.

Fitz
07-07-2014, 04:24 PM
The term spicy is stupid as shit. Are we talking about including a lot of different spices? Or are we talking about butthole flamethrowers?



I not too long ago consumed a few ghost peppers. I think it ruined me.

Resonance
07-07-2014, 06:52 PM
When I was little (6 or so) we were at my dad's friend's place and they had these little sausage buns and sriracha. My dad told me it was ketchup and loaded them up.

I cried a lot but it desensitized me enough that I now put that stuff on my mac'n'cheese and suchlike.

MacGuffin
07-08-2014, 12:05 AM
I eat spicy foods almost every meal.

Though I don't like it to be extremely spicy, the hotness can just overwhelm, and I am getting less tolerant as I get older. I'd say a good level is somewhere around a jalapeño pepper that's been seeded. Though jalapeños themselves aren't the best tasting pepper out there.

Catoptric
07-08-2014, 12:28 AM
I prefer the flavor of pepper/capsicum/pericarp and will often remove the seeds almost every time I use them, and may create more flavor out of concentrated use of pepper, for things like enchilada sauce (which I made up with sundried tomatoes to create a paste, and still have preserved in jars granny style.)

Piri piri pepper, sambal paste, and Cholula hot sauce (probably the best in the world), are what I've been using right now. I might try something like this Cambodian Hot Sauce (http://www.amazon.com/Black-Market-Hot-Sauce-Cambodian/dp/B007029BS8/ref=pd_sim_misc_5?ie=UTF8&refRID=1B5XY6JCAYBDCMT8SCA9)

jigglypuff
07-08-2014, 12:29 AM
The term spicy is stupid as shit.
i think i like "spicy food" (i wasn't sure what this thread considers "spicy") relative to the average (?) american diet/tastes but i probably wouldn't be able to take many (probably most) spicy foods of the world, so that's why i didn't vote. there's probably a baseline spicy that's "normal" when it comes to a lot of asian dishes, plus i live in the home of da rooster sauce and it's basically treated like ketchup with a kick.

with spicy food there is always a physical limit. if you go past yours, it just hurts.

Thevenin
07-08-2014, 12:30 AM
The hotter the better. I go through a large bottle of tabasco every month. But, my favorite is from The Boulder Hot Sauce (http://boulderhotsauce.com) Company. It just has such a great taste. Unfortunately, my better half is not one for anything hot and spicy. So, when I fried shrimp this past weekend, I made two sauces--one wimpy for her and one sufficiently stimulating for me. I truly believe that hot sauce induces endorphins…or, at least I like to think so.

I'm growing a bunch of habanero plants in my garden this summer with the idea of mixing up my own special "Thevenin's Hot Sauce." We'll see how it turns out.

Hephaestus
07-08-2014, 03:44 AM
plus i live in the home of da rooster sauce and it's basically treated like ketchup with a kick.
Sriracha : ketchup :: tasty : inedible


The hotter the better. I go through a large bottle of tabasco every month. But, my favorite is from The Boulder Hot Sauce (http://boulderhotsauce.com) Company. It just has such a great taste. Unfortunately, my better half is not one for anything hot and spicy. So, when I fried shrimp this past weekend, I made two sauces--one wimpy for her and one sufficiently stimulating for me. I truly believe that hot sauce induces endorphins…or, at least I like to think so.


...Tapatio makes Tabasco seem wretched (to me Tobasco is the ketchup of hot sauces--see above analogy). Though I really prefer Cholula. However, I have found one excellent use for Tobasco: Biscuits and Gravy.

When I was a trucker, once or twice a week I would order a side of biscuits and a side of sausage gravy (because in many places, a little math reveals it's cheaper ala carte, though you may have to argue with a waitress later), and I'd add a pat of butter and a healthy splashing of Tobasco to the gravy, and stir it all in. The sausage fat and butterfat really brought out the fruitiness hidden away in the Tobasco. Heavenly.

Side note: don't you hate it when you order prime rib in a nice steakhouse and by default they bring you sour cream that's been sitting next to horseradish? I've learned to make a point of demanding the real stuff up front. Prime rib and sushi are both meals that should have you leaving with clear sinuses.

I have a Ghost Pepper salsa in the fridge. I don't use it for the things a person would normally use salsa for. I add spoonfuls of it to soups and broths or stir fry, because a teaspoon is sufficient to bring a quart of beef stock to a boil.

aT?/?Ta
07-08-2014, 06:41 AM
Im From Louisiana the home of "Is it hot enuf fer ya yet?" cooking. I have a sensitive pallet and can taste most ingredients and distinct flavors in whatever im eating and to me peppers and hot sauces and all the other mouth numbing condiments that are added to a dish or only good 4 one purpose and thats to try and overpower or blockout an otherwise horrible tasting meal, If i have 2 put so much spice on sumthan tht im sweating and my tounge is swelling up n my nose is running then i need to reconsider my future menu selections. Case in point Louisiana is known 4 its Spicy seafood its crawfish and shrimp etouffe and gumbos and if it wasnt 4 the fact tht its loaded wit so much pepper tht ur nose and ur tounge stops working thn u would never be able 2 stomach the smell of crawfish long enuf to walk by it let alone cover the table in em and sit down to eat. The poorer the people and the culture are the spicier there food is, u can go 2 any country in the world and if u wanna find the spiciest meals look 4 the lowest income areas. Poor cuts of meat and 2day old fish n shrimp go perfect with sum Wasabi and a few Ghost chilli peppers. So u can keep ur flaming hot buffalo wings I'll take a legquarter dusted in garlic and lemon pepper and slow basted in butter and olive oil

Thevenin
07-08-2014, 12:04 PM
Im From Louisiana the home of "Is it hot enuf fer ya yet?" cooking. I have a sensitive pallet and can taste most ingredients and distinct flavors in whatever im eating and to me peppers and hot sauces and all the other mouth numbing condiments...

Not surprisingly, taste is an individual thing. To generalize from your own experience is to apply your personal anecdote to all--generally a good way to be wrong. Obviously, some people don't like hot peppers, but many do. People have different sensitivities when it comes to taste, but what you find "mouth numbing," others find pleasant. And, this doesn't necessarily mean that they miss out on the other, more subtle tastes in a dish. I haven't done the research, but I wouldn't be surprised if people become more tolerant of hot pepper (i.e., capsicum) with continued exposure. Maybe it's a biological receptor that gets up- or down-regulated (or something analogous to that). I do know that babies in India are taught to enjoy hot and spicy food by a gradual increase in the spiciness of food that they are fed, so, some adaptation process is going on.

And, when I make crawfish or shrimp étouffée or gumbos, my shellfish is fresh. It's not worth the effort using crappy ingredients. And, I wouldn't disparage the cuisines of poor people. I'm happy with cajun and creole, not to mention Indian, Mexican, Hunan/Szechuan, Thai, or even some Hungarian.

ACow
07-08-2014, 12:35 PM
I think i'm a bit of a baby when it comes to spicy food, which isn't really surprising, because i'm a bit hyper-sensitive to most things.

I'm at the "lowest possible spicyness" range of foods, which is to say I can take spice, but only that which is widely regarded as the lower end of the spectrum.

Westernised thai green/red curries are probably my current physical limit for still enjoying it. I find the relatively mild indian curries and the like quite pleasing, but vindaloos are effectively a no-go zone. Szechuan cooking is delicious, but I imagine like most of the other dishes, if i were exposed to some of it in its raw/native form, it would probably blow my head off...

Resonance
07-08-2014, 02:55 PM
One of my psych profs mentioned that extroverts tend to like spicy food more than introverts, so I went looking for a source that actually says that.

Found something that says the opposite, sadly:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21986186

Individual differences between users and non-users were primarily related to sensory and cultural attributes (i.e., a higher proportion of users reported consuming spicy foods since childhood and users rated spicy foods as more palatable and were better able to discriminate this burn than non-users). Users and non-users exhibited comparable responsiveness to noxious pressure pain, oral tactile sensitivity, and auditory sensitivity, varying only in responsiveness to oral thermal heat (i.e., users were more sensitive to increases than non-users). Studied personality traits did not vary between users and non-users.
Small sample size, but big enough to suggest that even if personality does play a role, it's not a big one compared to experiential factors.

Found something a bit tangentially related though, and this one was a much bigger study: ( gps , you might find some support for your ideas here)
http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/psp-101-3-579.pdf

Personality traits contribute to health outcomes, in part through their association with major controllable
risk factors, such as obesity. Body weight, in turn, reflects our behaviors and lifestyle and contributes to
the way we perceive ourselves and others. In this study, the authors use data from a large (N 1,988)
longitudinal study that spanned more than 50 years to examine how personality traits are associated with
multiple measures of adiposity and with fluctuations in body mass index (BMI).


Here's a more comprehensive, human-readable digest with sources (including the one I referenced above):
http://www.mindthesciencegap.org/2013/03/20/some-like-it-hot-part-1-why-do-some-people-have-a-preference-for-spicy-foods/

and part 2: Is spicy good for your health? http://www.mindthesciencegap.org/2013/03/27/some-like-it-hot-part-2-is-spicy-food-good-for-your-health/

aT?/?Ta
07-08-2014, 03:04 PM
See i got so enthralled in bashing poor people food I got off of my original point, I brought up the fact that i have a sensitive pallet and it takes less abrupt stimulation to garner a response from my taste buds, I have always felt that people who like Alot of spiciness in there meals have less receptive taste bud responses there fore it takes stronger stimuli to get the proper amount of sensation and sense of satisfaction from your tounge to your brain. Its not so much personal preference as it is equipment tolerances people who are sensitive 2 spicey food usually also hav a more keen sense of smell and also cant tolerate strong aromas witout sneezing or getn a runnynose. And the majority of people who eat as if there tounge is leather actually hav a fairly sensitive pallet but human evolution has pushed us 2 a point were normal stimuli is no longer effective at satisfying our 5 senses so istead of allowing our senses dull our evolutionary hard-wiring beckons to our senses to seek greater satisfaction so our senses will always stay sharp n we will always stay on top of the food chain!

last_caress
07-08-2014, 03:56 PM
what about spicy legato?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEV8fpqeTmY

Senseye
07-08-2014, 04:55 PM
I don't mind spicy foods, but only to the extent I can handle the heat and not just be in pain. I can handle moderate levels by white western guy standards, but I am probably a wuss by spicy food cultures standards.

Also, I am not from the school that everything should be spicy. So I'm not the type to add hot sauce to pretty much anything and everything. So no spicy biscuits for me. Biscuits are not a food item I associate with heat.

Dishes (cuisine styles) that are know for being spicy (hot) I like with heat levels I can tolerate. But dishes not associated with heat, I generally do not want to add hot sauce too. It might not ruin the dish, but the heat detracts from the dish rather than adds to it in my opinion.

aT?/?Ta
07-08-2014, 07:59 PM
I am only bottled water. Once I flowed freely thru a small town creek. Abducted by Nestle n packaged so sleek, now im just a sleazy H2 Ho selling my body and losing my soul :(

MacGuffin
07-09-2014, 12:19 AM
Im From Louisiana the home of "Is it hot enuf fer ya yet?" cooking. I have a sensitive pallet and can taste most ingredients and distinct flavors in whatever im eating and to me peppers and hot sauces and all the other mouth numbing condiments that are added to a dish or only good 4 one purpose and thats to try and overpower or blockout an otherwise horrible tasting meal, If i have 2 put so much spice on sumthan tht im sweating and my tounge is swelling up n my nose is running then i need to reconsider my future menu selections. Case in point Louisiana is known 4 its Spicy seafood its crawfish and shrimp etouffe and gumbos and if it wasnt 4 the fact tht its loaded wit so much pepper tht ur nose and ur tounge stops working thn u would never be able 2 stomach the smell of crawfish long enuf to walk by it let alone cover the table in em and sit down to eat. The poorer the people and the culture are the spicier there food is, u can go 2 any country in the world and if u wanna find the spiciest meals look 4 the lowest income areas. Poor cuts of meat and 2day old fish n shrimp go perfect with sum Wasabi and a few Ghost chilli peppers. So u can keep ur flaming hot buffalo wings I'll take a legquarter dusted in garlic and lemon pepper and slow basted in butter and olive oil

A Louisianan that can't eat spicy food? That is a tragedy, like a Frenchman allergic to bread.

rincon
07-09-2014, 09:00 AM
I always wondered if trolls like hot sauce, since blowing things out their asses seems to come so naturally without it...

Roger Mexico
07-09-2014, 11:59 PM
If you go vegetarian you probably have to learn to like spice. Meat has its own kind of flavor, and if you're raised on typical American cooking just about everything will seem bland if you just remove the meat and keep everything else the same.

I think I approach food the way I approach music--sometimes you just want one thing and a lot of it, but for me to truly have a stimulating and rewarding experience (and feel that I'm experiencing true craftsmanship, whether my own or someone else's) what I'm after is complexity and a sense of disparate elements that complement one another, ideally in counterintuitive or unexpected ways.

"Spciy" is a bit too broad of a term for me to state a generalized opinion. I think I generally prefer "tangy" over "hot" flavors, if I have to pick one. Not that I like having to pick one, because something that is just loaded up with, say, as much "hot" spice as possible isn't especially enjoyable--it lacks sublety and balance, and more to the point, too much of any one flavor tends to just make my tongue go numb such that I won't really be enjoying anything about the meal beyond feeling stuff go into my stomach. I frankly find this approach to seasoning lazy and uninspired--I mean, it doesn't take any particular skill to just dump as much cayenne or something into the food as you can get away with. The ability to take moderate quantities of several different spices and make them work well together is far more interesting and impressive than the ability to take one type of spiciness and just crank it up to 11.

At present I'm still rather enamored of what you can typically get at Thai restaurants in the US. Basil and ginger are the go-to base spices rather than peppers, which I like. The mix of tangy and hot with sweetness is quite compelling. It's a whole different kind of spicy than what I'm otherwise used to, which is predominantly pepper-based Mexican cuisine. (And with Mexican food I avoid anything with Jalapenos--they always taste somehow off to me. Habaneros are great, but the food shouldn't be overloaded with them--just enough for some kick but not enough to overwhelm the otherwise starchy/fatty richness that I like about Mexican cooking.)