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Phil P
10-22-2014, 04:30 AM
I know we had a little discussion about this earlier in the year. Have you guys ever got around to actually fasting for a significant period of time? I have done a few almost 1 day stretches here with the college semester starting up. The problem I keep encountering is that fasting is a REAL drain on energy, intellectual capacity, and overall mood. While I think it's healthy, it's rather hard to find a day where you don't have to do anything physically or mentally demanding or where you don't mind being in a very nonexcited or nonhappy mood.

What fasting has convinced me of is that food releases a whole bunch of happy chemicals to your brain. This instantaneous reward I believe is a big reason why obesity occurs so often, because people choose the instantaneous happiness over long term well being.

What about you guys?

lethe
10-22-2014, 05:43 AM
Well, I do not agree that fasting is healthy. At all, although I don't consider most shorter intermittent fasting as real fasting. I think it's what and how much people eat that makes them fat, not the frequency. But I guess that isn't the main discussion here...

I easily go three days with keeping regular activity and some working out before noticing a problem or a significant drop in energy. Four or five if I'm being lazy. During these times I also have difficulty sleeping, and it is very difficult to get my appetite back. I suppose it isn't pure fasting as I'll usually have a caffeine drink in the morning. Restrict the water and it's a completely different story.

Other times when I sleep a lot and my appetite is high, I get negative effects after as little as 14 hours. I don't know what causes these high energy/low energy cycles, but they seem to gain momentum if I don't keep the food and sleep intake level.

JohnClay
10-22-2014, 07:29 AM
On another forum I posted quite a lot about fasting. BTW in the Bible the 3 guys that got together in the "transfiguration" were Jesus, Moses and Elijah. Those were the three people who allegedly fasted for 40 days.

Also Matthew 6:16-18:

When you fast, do not look somber as the hypocrites do, for they disfigure their faces to show others they are fasting. Truly I tell you, they have received their reward in full. But when you fast, put oil on your head and wash your face, so that it will not be obvious to others that you are fasting, but only to your Father, who is unseen; and your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you.
BTW I'm an agnostic.

I asked my doctor what the longest time I could safely fast was and he said a week is fine. I ended up fasting for 48 hours. I was sweating and was worried I had low blood sugar but I think I was just getting too hot from walking with a backpack on.

http://cristivlad.com/total-starvation-382-days-without-food-study/

....I recently came across this study from 1973 in which a 27 years old male has fasted for 382 days under the supervision of researchers from a Scotland University....

.....Throughout the entire period of 382 days, patient A.B. consumed water and had taken vitamin supplements, yeast for the first 10 months, potassium supplements (Day 93 to Day 162), and sodium supplements (Day 345 to Day 355). Urine and blood collections were taken throughout the whole period of fasting. Fecal evacuations were infrequent in the later period of the fasting, as the time between stools was averaging from 37-48 days, as the researchers claim....

BTW I've been looking at a few diets. One is called the Warrior Diet and involves "undereating" during the day (and "overeating" at night) while a diet based on it called the Renegade Diet involves about 16 hour fasts. I think the Leangains diet is similar. Some (mostly amateur) bodybuilders use those diets. Eat Stop Eat involves fasting for 24 hours at a time about 2 days per week. There is also the 5 : 2 diet that involves undereating (25% of normal) two days per week for about 36 hours at a time.

Those diets are meant to target fat loss but there is a danger that muscle can be lost if you don't give your muscles a work out.

Those diets often also say that you should eat organic foods and grass-fed meat, etc, but according to another messageboard those things don't make a difference for fat loss.

ACow
10-22-2014, 10:29 AM
Is there actually any evidence that fasting does anything good? Because naturally, and i do not mean offense in this even though it is offensive, it seems a priori like a rather stupid/negative thing to do...

Architect
10-22-2014, 11:53 AM
Is there actually any evidence that fasting does anything good?

Yes there have been numerous studies done on it naturally.

Blorg
10-22-2014, 02:04 PM
I know we had a little discussion about this earlier in the year. Have you guys ever got around to actually fasting for a significant period of time? I have done a few almost 1 day stretches here with the college semester starting up. The problem I keep encountering is that fasting is a REAL drain on energy, intellectual capacity, and overall mood. While I think it's healthy, it's rather hard to find a day where you don't have to do anything physically or mentally demanding or where you don't mind being in a very nonexcited or nonhappy mood.

What fasting has convinced me of is that food releases a whole bunch of happy chemicals to your brain. This instantaneous reward I believe is a big reason why obesity occurs so often, because people choose the instantaneous happiness over long term well being.

What about you guys?

yay, another thread to write about my idiocy (it seems like that's all I've been doing here lately).

I went through an extended spell (more than a few weeks, but I don't know exactly how long) of fasting periods, eating a few eggs or some jam/toast every two or three days, around this time last year and I'd done something similar a long time ago-- it's not a very good idea ime. I've only started eating regularly (1200+ calories) about a week ago and I do think my moods are more stable; it had reached the point where I couldn't focus on anything because my emotions were so dramatic. I was sobbing over a book I had to read for class because I couldn't stop my thoughts from wandering. It's better now that I'm eating again, but it's not like the effects vanished. When I was actually fasting as opposed to just eating very little, my mood was flat and I had no motivation, but I don't know what the causes/effects are that led me to that state (the fasting might have been more of a symptom-- a former therapist thought I might have a sub-clinical bipolar disorder and my eating habits reflected a misguided attempt to regulate my moods). Generally, with the exception of that fasting phase, starvation seems to make me run on adrenaline. Everything made me jump/get irritable, or I'd descend into abysses over trivial things, and it seemed to give me more physical energy-- I could walk all night without wearing myself out.

Leaving the long-term fast, it took me a long time (months) to build my appetite up to an existent level and get that boost of happy chemicals from food. After it goes on for too long, I think it's a self-perpetuating cycle.

I wish people wouldn't consider extreme dieting a sport. No wonder we're all maniacal brain-deprived zombies.

Senseye
10-22-2014, 02:53 PM
Yes there have been numerous studies done on it naturally.There have been numerous studies, and I believe the results are inconclusive. Fasting is generally considered ineffective for weight loss. There is some hand waving about "detox" benefits, but those are pretty sketchy. Some studies have been done about fasting for prevention of heart disease, cancer, etc. All inconclusive but there may be some minor benefits.

So as far as ACow 's query, I would say, no actual evidence that intermittent fasting is good for you. It's probably psychological, if you think it makes you feel better, it does, if you don't think so, probably not so much.

Faust
10-22-2014, 06:28 PM
I'm curious as to what djm's opinion is, since he's mentioned he works clear-minded on an empty stomach.

In the past, it must have been common for humans to go without food for some bouts of time. Certainly it's not detrimental in observed cultural fasters like Orthodox Greeks, but it's unclear to me whether the benefits of intermittent fasting or otherwise are significant enough to warrant adoption.

Blorg
10-22-2014, 07:45 PM
I'm curious as to what djm's opinion is, since he's mentioned he works clear-minded on an empty stomach.

In the past, it must have been common for humans to go without food for some bouts of time. Certainly it's not detrimental in observed cultural fasters like Orthodox Greeks, but it's unclear to me whether the benefits of intermittent fasting or otherwise are significant enough to warrant adoption.

Orthodox Greek people fast because they want to suffer and hate life so that they can empathize better with the suffering of holy people or God or whoever. It's about withstanding bodily needs and it's not something they do for mental or physical health benefits (just "spiritual benefits"). It's not like you see Shape magazine covers with "New Famine Just In Time for Bikini Season!" written on them. Going without food for long periods of time makes us miserable, mentally sluggish, apathetic, and unhealthy. It's something that the majority of the world's population, historically and now, fears like the plague, for very good reasons.

Food energizes the brain. Unhealthy food might create chemical imbalances that rival the imbalances that happen during starvation; that doesn't mean that "fasting" is preferable to eating. People should just eat healthy foods (if and when they can, of course) and eat them in moderation. It's not complicated and it doesn't have to involve suffering.

stuck
10-22-2014, 08:13 PM
From what I've picked up, the benefits of fasting are hormonal beyond the secondary effect of losing weight. I don't have sources, but I remember reading somewhere that leptin, ghrelin, insulin, and growth hormone levels are all modulated. I intermittently fast every day, only eating from 2pm to 10pm. I can say anecdotally that I have adjusted to it completely, and that it has made a difference in how hungry I get. I also tend to be very productive on an empty stomach, with a little bit of coconut oil and coffee. This might also be because I limit carb consumption (not quite enough to go into ketosis, however).

I think the "detox" benefits are overstated, especially since people who tend to fast tend to eat well anyway.

The downsides include:

muscle loss- anytime you lose weight, you're gonna lose muscle. if you severely limit calories for any length of time, you're much more at danger for muscle wasting. a popular diet that mitigates this factor is a PSMF, or protein-sparing modified fast. again, you're still gonna lose muscle, but not as much because you're keeping your serum levels of protein up. more muscle is never a bad thing, unless you're on IFBB levels of steroids and HGH in order to maintain a 280-pound ripped physique.

probably some due to the reason above, but your metabolism can be reduced. this is generally overstated, but there was an army study that found that people who limited their calories to 1/2 of their TDEE for four months lost 10-40% of their metabolism (like 700-1,000 calories for your average person). it came back, but yeah, that's not good. if you break a long fast and start eating shit, you are probably gonna get pretty fucking fat.

Faust
10-22-2014, 08:18 PM
Orthodox Greek people fast because they want to suffer and hate life so that they can empathize better with the suffering of holy people or God or whoever. It's about withstanding bodily needs and it's not something they do for mental or physical health benefits (just "spiritual benefits").

A bit misrepresentative, but intentions aren't relevant here. At the risk of being repetitive - the Mediterranean diet studies of the past used sample populations of fasters and failed to account for it.

stuck
10-22-2014, 08:18 PM
broscience spewfest continued:

Intermittent Fasting is wonderful mainly for the reason that some people find it much easier to control their appetite. You get none of the muscle wasting issues of a total fast because your body doesn't care TOO much if you get all your calories in a small period of time. obviously this has its limits, but (again this is useless hearsay because i don't feel like sourcing things) people even diet "one day on, one day off" without fucking with their systems horribly.

ciphersort
10-22-2014, 08:35 PM
I've never intentionally fasted and I don't think it's good for sharks.

Blorg
10-22-2014, 09:09 PM
A bit misrepresentative, but intentions aren't relevant here. At the risk of being repetitive - the Mediterranean diet studies of the past used sample populations of fasters and failed to account for it.

I was being pointlessly hyperbolic and facetious (I don't actually have anything against Greek Orthodox followers) but my point in bringing up their intentions was to show that it's not something that they do in order to feel better/healthier, which I felt you implied-- in fact it can have severely detrimental effects on health. It's associated with mourning and they fast in order to empathize with suffering people. So I don't think it was relevant or useful to bring up the topic of Greek Orthodoxy; their example doesn't prove anything about the supposed mental (or physical) health benefits of fasting. (Non-fasting Mediterranean diets are a different topic.)

As was the case in the other thread, I feel like members mean very different things when they refer to fasting, and the studies they cited in that thread probably interpret the concept of fasting differently, too. For that reason, filtered through intpx, it seems like pseudoscience to me. Not to sound pretentious, but it also seems to be rooted in the same cultural instincts that appear to inspire Greek Orthodox fasters-- dualistic triumph over the body by means of puritanism. It's turning dieting, which does have the potential to be healthy for some people, into a repressive and religiously-tinted mission that could easily escalate into obsessive, extreme, and unhealthy eating behavior. Not saying that's the case-- it's just my perceptions.

Blorg
10-22-2014, 09:29 PM
I know this (http://www.mensxp.com/health/live-healthy/5638-why-fasting-is-bad-for-you.html) is a kind of pop-sciencey source but I feel like it covers my suspicions pretty well. It also doesn't delineate between different lengths of fasts, but certain points (such as "fasting won't help weight loss") I'd assume to hold true for fasts of all lengths.


Higher Stress
Fasting leads to slower metabolism and higher cortisol - which is a recipe for high stress.

Fasting Damages Your Muscles
Your body will feed off your body; cortisol will leach amino acids from your own muscles so that it has sugar to consume. This sugar will go to your brain, kidneys and RBCs . While fat is useful to the brain, it likes sugar, and red blood cells.

Fasting Damages your Digestion
"Fasting creates an abnormal physiological state. Those who adopt fasting as a means of detoxification ultimately end up developing gastrointestinal problems," says Dr S K Thakur, senior consultant, gastroenterologist, Moolchand Medcity.

Your body has peak times for secretion of digestive enzymes (at breakfast, lunch and dinner) are "In the absence of food, these enzymes keep circulating within and damage the lining of the digestive tract. This leads to acid reflux, gastritis problems and even ulcer," says Dr Thakur.

The gall bladder's bile contents are used for digestion when you eat. When bile doesn't have food to act upon, it gets stored inside your gall bladder.

"In the absence of food, this bile keeps accumulating inside the gall bladder. Gradually it can turn into sludge, leading to the formation of stones," cautions Dr Thakur.

Fasting Kills Your Immunity
When you don't eat, your intestinal tract (responsible for over 70% of your antibodies) will stops working for your immunity. In the absence of antibodies, bacteria, toxins, and viruses suddenly have a easier time staying alive inside your gut. When the raw material necessary for a intestinal tract (sufficient calories, proteins, and certain vitamins and minerals) is missing, your immunity is shot.

Which is why people die from long term fasting.

Fasting Won't Help Weight Loss
What you're losing is actually water weight (the water content in food also counts!). And the weight lost due to ketosis comes back - you'll crave high fat foods after a fast. You might even think you deserve some off-time from your diet and forget about exercising and eating right. Eating normally will bring back your hunger, but the slower metabolism, combined with an increased appetite will make you fat.

Long term ketosis kills - your body is converting protein into sugar, and this protein comes from the liver, spleen and muscles. Soon, your blood glucose level falls, leading to electrolytes imbalance occurs - and then death.

Fasting Gives our Bodies a Rest
Every second, hormones are at play, enzymes are swimming about, and your energy cells are storing energy. All this needs food. No food will put a strain on your body's vital processes - not 'rest' it.

The Fasting Detox Myth
The most vocalized, yet the least scientifically understood myth, a vague and faulty understanding of the body purging toxins when we fast is used to justify fasting. This belief doesn't take into account the processed nature of our food, and the stringent food safety regulations.

In fact, fasting puts stain on our liver and kidneys which are continuously working to "detox". If you are healthy, your body is pretty much toxin free already. And the above-mentioned ketones, along with increased nitrogen products will put more strain on your body. The only cleanse you can have is eating healthy food and a regular bowel movements.

Faust
10-22-2014, 10:07 PM
in fact it can have severely detrimental effects on health.

Except it didn't.


their example doesn't prove anything about the supposed mental (or physical) health benefits of fasting.

Aside from it not being severely detrimental? No. We know that caloric restriction improves lifespan, and without getting into semantics and conflation, we can agree that fasting can be one means to that end if it's not done for stupid lengths of time.


It also doesn't delineate between different lengths of fasts

There's your problem.

Blorg
10-22-2014, 10:42 PM
^I know that you're tired of discussing this with me and that's probably why you wrote such sweeping generalities, but still-- it's ironic that you agree with my own criticism of my source's ambiguity and then write such an ambiguous response. Some of the source's criticisms apply to fasts of all lengths ("the fasting detox myth," "fasting gives our bodies a rest," "fasting won't help weight loss"). Other criticisms-- the more serious ones-- might apply to both short term fasts and long term ones since they don't specify; the fact that you immediately reject the idea that short-term fasts could cause health problems suggests that you're biased against the possibility. I could share more research but it doesn't seem like it would be worth the effort.

"We know that caloric restriction improves lifespan"-- "semantics," ie details, are crucial to the validity of claims like this.

"Except it didn't"-- for who? Everyone? You? Etc.

stuck
10-22-2014, 11:19 PM
yeah the gallstones research seems scary, pointing to moderation in your diet.

Phil P
10-23-2014, 03:59 PM
I'm gonna agree that extended fasts aren't healthy. Especially for someone who isn't used to fasting. Why would anyone want to lose muscle mass?

But... I do think it's a good idea to fast one day once. The reason being is that it shows how much food really does affect your brain. And it's also a good empathy exercise; it shows what hunger is like. So basically, I think it's more important for the experience rather than a health benifit. That said, its not one of those things you have to do every week.

As far as your diet stuck, I'm kinda the same way. I eat a little bite in the morning, and then eat again about 4pm and again at about 8 to 9pm. At first it was hard to adjust to, but now I can run on that diet without the energy drain, and I'm not excessively hungry with that plan. It's probably a good way for me to not ever really start putting on weight.

stuck
10-24-2014, 12:20 AM
Apparently one can mitigate the risk of gallstone formation from rapid weight loss with a higher fat content in their diet.

http://www.cghjournal.org/article/S1542-3565(13)01837-5/abstract

So my intermittent fasting where I have coconut oil in my morning coffee stays.

Spartan26
10-25-2014, 04:38 AM
When I fast it's for spiritual reasons. There can be a sort of a mental benefit in that it allows me to find what my mind will gravitate towards and I'm much more acutely aware, as opposed to other times when I really don't realize how much I might be sharpening my ax over something someone's done or too me centered. I can then stop and focus on more productive things or affirming things.

I tend to go absolute fast, which precludes long periods because you can't go too long w/out water and expect to live. I believe it's called the Samuel fast, which was in the bible, 21 days, no meat, no sweets, no bread. I definitely experienced a detoxing of my body. I really shunned soda after that for a long while. None of the other stuff stuck but I didn't feel like having donuts or other sweets except in very small portions. I think I did lose a little weight. I didn't go to the gym much during that time so who knows if I would've dumped even more pounds. It's not really a cause for concern but a little leaner and meaner wouldn't hurt.

I do know some people who did a 40 day fast. All they had was an occasional broth or water. They definitely lost weight. They said it was rather hard to describe but trans-formative. I don't know if I'd ever do that. I did used to wonder how effective a fast was if it was too easy, so to speak. I don't think I really wanted to suffer but denying yourself is a core belief of Christianity. Though, self control seems to get totally overlooked in North America. Anyway, I can't really do much when I fast and so my natural inclination is do it on a slow news day, if you will. I'd almost wish I could go w/out oxygen for like an hour cuz I hated fasting so much I just wanted to get it over with. I do realize I've gotten answers or assurance after just one missed meal, so killing myself isn't necessary.

I did it more in my late 20s to early 30s. One time I went to the doctor and when he went over my blood results he said they were all clear but one little thing, maybe potassium out of whack, he said it wouldn't worry about over one test but said it's can be an issue for people who fast a lot. Wow, I think I had only done 2-3 days in the past several months. I was surprised it would've picked that up.

It could be caffeine withdrawals or whatever else but sometimes I'm amazed at the level of anger and frustration that comes out or bubbles up with I fast. Hunger or rather my desire for food is more so to stop a headache than plain hunger. I could see it being a health benefit because even if the anger or frustration is a phantom pain, dealing with buried issues, often ones you don't realize or consider as being too prominent can reduce stress on your heart and neck and veins. My desires for junk food greatly diminished. They were mostly desires for comfort foods. I don't know if a long, extended fast would be necessary for that of shorter ones maybe stringed together over a few weeks might foster some results.

Phil P
10-29-2014, 12:07 AM
Interesting article Stuck!

Anyways, I have noticed that I become much more irritable and short tempered on fasts. I wonder if it's a sugar withdrawl? I have been trying to cut back on sugar intake for a while now, but I notice when I eat it, it does more to wake me up and energize me than even caffeine.

stuck
10-29-2014, 12:22 AM
Interesting article Stuck!

Anyways, I have noticed that I become much more irritable and short tempered on fasts. I wonder if it's a sugar withdrawl? I have been trying to cut back on sugar intake for a while now, but I notice when I eat it, it does more to wake me up and energize me than even caffeine.

Your body doesn't like eating itself no matter if you get there via slow reduction or a quick crash.

Regarding sugar:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2235907/

Phil P
10-29-2014, 03:31 PM
Your body doesn't like eating itself no matter if you get there via slow reduction or a quick crash.

Regarding sugar:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2235907/
True. I don't really fast that often, but I'm getting more convinced that there are as many negatives to fasting as positives. So I won't be doing more than about 12 hour stretches.

Senseye
10-29-2014, 07:43 PM
True. I don't really fast that often, but I'm getting more convinced that there are as many negatives to fasting as positives. So I won't be doing more than about 12 hour stretches.And why even that? Just for convenience? I suppose I fast 12-15 hours every day since I am too lazy to make breakfast. So depending on my last snack of the day (generally not later than 9:00 pm) I won't eat until noon the next day. That's 15 hours.

Phil P
10-30-2014, 09:35 PM
And why even that? Just for convenience? I suppose I fast 12-15 hours every day since I am too lazy to make breakfast. So depending on my last snack of the day (generally not later than 9:00 pm) I won't eat until noon the next day. That's 15 hours.

Exactly. I don't want to pack myself a lunch and it takes to long to buy one at college cause you have to take a 40 minute round trip bus ride to get any decent food.

avolkiteshvara
11-17-2014, 04:42 AM
Interesting article Stuck!

Anyways, I have noticed that I become much more irritable and short tempered on fasts. I wonder if it's a sugar withdrawl?

I do low carb fasting for 16-18 hours most days. Took me about 3.5 months to adjust. I could't get past 10am without eating something. I'd get cranky with low energy. Couldn't think. I'm pretty good now though. I could go 24 hours at at time . Don't need that glucose boost in the morning to get me going.

Linnea
11-17-2014, 12:32 PM
Anyways, I have noticed that I become much more irritable and short tempered on fasts. I wonder if it's a sugar withdrawl? I have been trying to cut back on sugar intake for a while now, but I notice when I eat it, it does more to wake me up and energize me than even caffeine.

(I'm not sure if I have written about this before or not.) I sometimes get irritated when I'm hungry and then my ability to make even simple decisions worsens the hungrier I get. But this does not happen on fast days when I'm hungry on purpose. I read somewhere about glucose levels in the brain and it may be that sometimes when the fast is on purpose, the brain saves energy so the effect on mood, cognitive abilities etc. may be different when you are hungry on purpose than when you are hungry because you missed dinner. And I'm feeling lazy so I didn't search for links to provide, sorry.

I didn't do regular IF for a long time, and I decided to try if I can do it somewhat consistently until Christmas to see if it has an effect on my mood in the long run. But I won't follow a strict schedule and I won't fast before my period, since trying to fast when I have the munchies would make life too interesting for the people around me.

Sloth
11-25-2014, 04:08 AM
I do low carb fasting for 16-18 hours most days. Took me about 3.5 months to adjust. I could't get past 10am without eating something. I'd get cranky with low energy. Couldn't think. I'm pretty good now though. I could go 24 hours at at time . Don't need that glucose boost in the morning to get me going.

I'm doing the no carb thing for a week or two. I'm turning into a butterball, slowly but surely. Some friends of mine have done it before with some good results, though I've been told to prepare myself for a weird detoxing kind of feeling after a few days.

Today is day 1.

baccheion
09-01-2015, 08:22 PM
I've done a 5-day water fast, and I wanted to go even longer. The key to a safe water fast is breaking it properly. If you went on a 3-day fast, breaking it will take another 3 days. Water fasting has many healing + rejuvenation benefits, and it also results in taste buds "resetting." That is, it becomes easy to replace old eating habits with the ones you prefer.

Also, eating within an 8-hour window works better than not eating 1-2 days per week, and has effects similar to caloric restriction.

kitsune
09-01-2015, 09:05 PM
I did a 10-day master cleanse earlier this year and would like to try a water fast this month.

Like you mentioned baccheion, I also noticed a resetting of my taste buds. I stopped craving sugars and starches and craved everything that was green.

The biggest issue coming off the fast was the voracious return of the appetite. I ate too much too soon and ended up vomitting a kilo of chunky tomato soup with lots of stomach cramps. Later, I read it is typical for the appetite to become monstrous once a fast is over. You have to be really strict in fighting it so you don't hurt yourself (or kill yourself) by introducing foods too quickly before the digestive system is ready for them.

Aurast
09-03-2015, 02:54 AM
In high school I did some 24 hour fasts because the ones the church sponsored counted towards the school's yearly 20 hour community service requirement (for some reason).

I've been wanting to do a much longer one, something like two weeks, because of a digestive illness I'm willing to try all kinds of quackery to cure. But I don't know how I'll ever get around to it, and I'm wary of muscle loss.

Aurast
01-30-2016, 09:15 PM
I am three hours from ending a 72 hour fast. I feel pretty good, wasn't hungry at all earlier today, but feel a little hungry now. Yesterday was the toughest.

My mouth tastes like metal, my tongue turned white, and I feel a little weak, but I've been driving around running errands and stuff just fine.

I've heard the hunger is supposed to go away entirely or almost entirely on the fourth of fifth day but I'm not hanging around to see, not this time anyway.

Ptah
01-31-2016, 02:13 AM
I will post here as I begin to effectively fast this week whilst on a work trip overseas.

I've been stepping down my eating all week so it isn't such a shock.

Ptah
02-01-2016, 11:13 PM
40+ hours in so far. Woke up with ferocious hunger pang, but it subsided after I distracted myself with the morning routine. I know from here come the quakes in hunger pang round two, the worst of them. Undergoing culture shock at the same time should greatly drive down my apetite anyhow. We'll see.

Ptah
02-04-2016, 04:29 AM
5 or so days in, not a morsel of food or anything to drink other than water. Feeling very light-headed and feeble, reminiscent of what I felt like when I was trying an Atkins diet, such as during the initiation period meant to induce ketosis, iirc. Sleeping 9-11 hours a night, as if my body needs that rest or something. A very deep, somatic compulsion to just collapse when I'm done with the day.

Hephaestus
02-04-2016, 04:35 AM
If you get ferociously hungry... there's always internet videos of repulsive things.

Ptah
02-04-2016, 10:02 PM
So begins day 6. Having mostly shaken the nasty illness I had (slept it off, I think), I'm no longer dizzy or weak, like I was yesterday. In fact, I woke up today feeling better than I have this whole trip. Legs cramp up a bit when I sleep, but that's to be expected.

Ptah
02-07-2016, 08:28 PM
Ok. I wound up doing a total of a 7-day fast. Nothing but water the whole time. I got sick in the middle (due to my foreign surroundings more than the fast, I imagine), right when I was probably switching into ketosis. I wonder if that helped deflect the illness as fast as it did. Meanwhile, I think the illness gave me something else to be preoccupied with rather than hunger, because I never really felt any beyond the morning of the 2nd day.

When I did finally break the fast (with breakfast, of course), my body begin trembling and a euphoric effect took hold upon the first bite. It sustained through the whole meal. I had to consciously resist ravenously scarfing the whole plate, force myself to chew, take it slow, etc. I will say this, after having started eating again thirst seems to have spiked quite a bit. My joints and muscles are stiff, but that may be due more to jetlag than the fast.

Anyhow. Overall net effect? I lost 8 lbs, and thinned down a bit noticeably across my body. My skin is a bit clearer, but that may be unrelated.

Blorg
02-08-2016, 06:08 AM
I'm unintentionally fasting...I haven't eaten since Friday. (I had a few glasses of wine on Saturday so I guess there were a few calories, at least.) I just don't want to eat. Slightly disturbing. I haven't been sleeping either.

ciphersort
02-08-2016, 06:41 AM
I have never intentionally fasted and I don't believe it is good for sharks.

GnarlFox
02-08-2016, 11:31 AM
I might start fasting just to keep the food bill down. I got hit with a bunch of unexpected bills this month and I spent too much on food last month. I don't know if it counts but I slept for 24 hours yesterday.

I've done a few three day juice only fasts. Just a glass of juice per mealtime with water throughout. I've also done many, many twenty-four hour fasts but mostly when I was growing up.

avolkiteshvara
02-08-2016, 05:00 PM
Ok. I wound up doing a total of a 7-day fast. Nothing but water the whole time. I got sick in the middle (due to my foreign surroundings more than the fast, I imagine), right when I was probably switching into ketosis. I wonder if that helped deflect the illness as fast as it did. Meanwhile, I think the illness gave me something else to be preoccupied with rather than hunger, because I never really felt any beyond the morning of the 2nd day.

When I did finally break the fast (with breakfast, of course), my body begin trembling and a euphoric effect took hold upon the first bite. It sustained through the whole meal. I had to consciously resist ravenously scarfing the whole plate, force myself to chew, take it slow, etc. I will say this, after having started eating again thirst seems to have spiked quite a bit. My joints and muscles are stiff, but that may be due more to jetlag than the fast.

Anyhow. Overall net effect? I lost 8 lbs, and thinned down a bit noticeably across my body. My skin is a bit clearer, but that may be unrelated.

So Ptah is the reigning INTP-fast champion with 7 days.

How was your energy in day 5-7? They say that when you're supposed to hit cruising speed.

Ptah
02-08-2016, 06:14 PM
How was your energy in day 5-7? They say that when you're supposed to hit cruising speed.

Interesting. I was feeling the sharpest and liveliest (relatively) over the last two days (6-7).

Hephaestus
02-08-2016, 08:14 PM
I might start fasting just to keep the food bill down.

Ah, yes. Early 20's? Speakers or food, speakers or food... speakers last longer.

avolkiteshvara
03-22-2016, 06:20 PM
Started doing 40 hour fasts on Friday. Felt like I needed to augment IF. Definitely helped my sleep apnea. Pretty good.

Lurker
03-28-2016, 01:06 AM
Interesting. I was feeling the sharpest and liveliest (relatively) over the last two days (6-7).

Wow. It's quite surprising that you had the willpower to voluntarily do this at all.

From my experience, a high sets in on the second day, and you feel no hunger. I inadvertently near-fasted for 7 days last month; I probably consumed around 100 calories or less a day. It started when I decided to eat only when I felt physically hungry. Well, apparently, I don't feel that often enough, or I don't receive a strong signal, because I would starve if I followed that mantra very long. I lost nine pounds in a week, barely slept, and exercised with incredible enthusiasm. After the first few days, my stomach started to cramp when i swallowed a bite of food. I think I was eating a piece of broiled fish a day, plus water.

After a point, I did feel physical hunger, but still had no appetite. I had to force food. I never felt physically weak, really. Full of energy.

Very interesting experience that illuminates how an anorexic can actually starve him or herself without caving in and eating the fridge. You experience a floaty euphoria, or I did.

Then, I started eating again, and gained about five to six pounds back. I don't think it actually did anything helpful for my body.

avolkiteshvara
03-28-2016, 02:40 AM
Then, I started eating again, and gained about five to six pounds back. I don't think it actually did anything helpful for my body.

Could be the protein you ate suppressed HGH that kicks in to mitigate muscle catabolism?

Lurker
03-28-2016, 02:42 AM
Could be the protein you ate suppressed HGH that kicks in to mitigate muscle catabolism?

Thanks for mentioning that. I did eat nothing but protein...*googles*

edit: I actually ate fish because I thought the protein would preserve my muscle and prevent B-12 depletion. Ok, off to google again.

Limes
03-28-2016, 02:47 AM
I think I fast naturally. I almost never eat breakfast and probably only a few times a day. Some days, when I'm working onsite, I might go all the way to 5-6pm before eating.