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Sol4rplexus
12-14-2014, 10:54 PM
I have a few questions to you guys.


Do you value your nightly dreams?
Do they inspire you for creative projects (writings, drawings, movies)?
Are your dreams clear or blurry?
Do you tell friends about them?
Do you like to think about the possible meaning of your dreams?
Do you have a dream journal?
And are there any lucid dreamers amongst you?

Leave your answers below.


(Edit: Not sure if wrong subforum)

Madrigal
12-15-2014, 04:25 PM
Lucid dreamer here. (Although as an old comrade used to say, the trick is to be lucid in real life.)

I'm not doing it these days but I've conducted some experiments in lucid dreaming which I've written about in other threads. Premonitionary and psychic dreams run on both sides of my family (that is to say that they dream things that will happen and have happened without having been informed of the occurence IRL). So that history, combined with the fact that I have certain sleep disorders, has gotten me to explore the potential of dreaming lucidly.

Mostly, what I hope to do is to rummage around in my unconscious for things that my mind has pieced together but that I haven't yet become aware of in waking life. I don't really believe in any psychic or premonitionary powers that go beyond simple intuition. I just think that our intelligence doesn't seep into waking life as much as it could, and lucid dreaming is a way of opening up a channel between those two realms. It's like going inside your mind with a flashlight, finding something lying around and taking it back with you. It's basically just a way to open doors between your unconscious mind and your conscious one.

My method is the "wake back to bed" method. I go to sleep with a task and I wake up in my bed, still dreaming. Then I use an "astral projection" technique which I casually discovered (though it is documented as a technique used by some latin american tribe somewhere - I forget which) which is to look at your palm. You look at your palm and you're energized for the rest of your dream so that you don't wake up.

I don't have the time for this lately because I no longer try lucid dreaming at night. Since I "wake back to bed" and I'm afraid of nightime scenarios, I prefer to do this during afternoon naps.

ciphersort
12-15-2014, 11:17 PM
Dreams are garbage collection/management. Anyway... I experimented with Lucid Dreaming techniques a lot in my early 20s and had a lot of success. I also 'suffer from/greatly enjoy' sleep paralysis and found it to be the most effective state from which to launch into a fully lucid dream - or just go completely back to sleep or get my ass out of bed... or to do weird combined shit like make the digital clock on my nightstand count backwards.. or just display random shit.... After I discovered that on my own during the mid 90s I stopped using lucid dreaming techniques as they are unnecessary in my case. Most of the time these days I prefer just to sleep - I get too little as it is.
/blurb

Senseye
12-16-2014, 03:49 PM
Do you value your nightly dreams? Oh yes. I find them highly entertaining.
Do they inspire you for creative projects (writings, drawings, movies)? No. I'm not creative in those ways though.
Are your dreams clear or blurry? Clear, but I forget them amazingly quickly.
Do you tell friends about them? Not generally.
Do you like to think about the possible meaning of your dreams? No.
Do you have a dream journal? No, but I have thought about it just to help me remember some of them for posterity. I've been to lazy to ever act on it though.
And are there any lucid dreamers amongst you? Not I. Not willing to do anything that would mess up a good nights sleep.

Sol4rplexus
12-16-2014, 08:21 PM
Lucid dreamer here. (Although as an old comrade used to say, the trick is to be lucid in real life.)

I'm not doing it these days but I've conducted some experiments in lucid dreaming which I've written about in other threads. Premonitionary and psychic dreams run on both sides of my family (that is to say that they dream things that will happen and have happened without having been informed of the occurence IRL). So that history, combined with the fact that I have certain sleep disorders, has gotten me to explore the potential of dreaming lucidly.

Mostly, what I hope to do is to rummage around in my unconscious for things that my mind has pieced together but that I haven't yet become aware of in waking life. I don't really believe in any psychic or premonitionary powers that go beyond simple intuition. I just think that our intelligence doesn't seep into waking life as much as it could, and lucid dreaming is a way of opening up a channel between those two realms. It's like going inside your mind with a flashlight, finding something lying around and taking it back with you. It's basically just a way to open doors between your unconscious mind and your conscious one.

My method is the "wake back to bed" method. I go to sleep with a task and I wake up in my bed, still dreaming. Then I use an "astral projection" technique which I casually discovered (though it is documented as a technique used by some latin american tribe somewhere - I forget which) which is to look at your palm. You look at your palm and you're energized for the rest of your dream so that you don't wake up.

I don't have the time for this lately because I no longer try lucid dreaming at night. Since I "wake back to bed" and I'm afraid of nightime scenarios, I prefer to do this during afternoon naps.

Neat! We in my family have those foresight dreams too, it's weird. I guess our subconscious minds were just calculating the possibilities / brainstorming, and when the thing actually happens we remember having dreamt about it the other day. Truly a fascinating phenomena!

Lucid Dreaming started for me because I often quite randomly got sleep paralysis wake dreams, then I started to look up some techniques and explored all the possibilities. Back when I lived with my parents I could usually do the WBTB method without an alarm clock because I used to go to bed at 2 and my parents started making noise at 8, which woke me up exactly 6 hours after going to sleep.
I learned to warp around in dreams and my method to "reality check" was looking at my hand in the dream, which I learned about in a lucid dreaming online community.

But now I don't practice it anymore either. Barely got enough time to sleep more than 8 hours each day. *tired sigh*

Hephaestus
12-17-2014, 05:54 PM
Do you value your nightly dreams?

Yes. I often prefer them to daily life.


Do they inspire you for creative projects (writings, drawings, movies)?

Yeah. Definitely. Both indirectly and directly. The direct is obvious--use the events as raw material for stories, or try and draw something I remember seeing, etc. But the indirect is more interesting. The indirect is that the act of dreaming itself is, as ciphersort says, garbage collection for the brain.

An important part of my general problem solving process is to "sleep on it". Except that where that adage refers to making difficult decisions, I also apply it to solving more abstract problems--like writing papers or programs, or figuring out how to make something.


Are your dreams clear or blurry?

Depends. Generally they are clear and vivid. If they are blurry it's because I'm in a blurry world--like say, walking underwater or in a fog or something.


Do you tell friends about them?

If they're interesting. I leave the question as to whether the antecedent of that pronoun is the friends or the dreams as an exercise for the reader.


Do you like to think about the possible meaning of your dreams?

Yes, but not in the sense you mean with this question. What I like to do is figure out what event in my day turned into what. There are plenty of times where I can point to a particular motif and say "Aha. That's because I've been doing XYZ". I think that's a useful thing to observe. Ironically, such observations are also useful for the sort of interpretation the question intends--provided you recognize that the dream is simply telling you where you're subconscious is focused and don't take an oracular route.


Do you have a dream journal?

Nope.


And are there any lucid dreamers amongst you?

Probably? Some have claimed, but how would I know?

Madrigal
12-18-2014, 03:10 AM
Neat! We in my family have those foresight dreams too, it's weird. I guess our subconscious minds were just calculating the possibilities / brainstorming, and when the thing actually happens we remember having dreamt about it the other day. Truly a fascinating phenomena!

Lucid Dreaming started for me because I often quite randomly got sleep paralysis wake dreams, then I started to look up some techniques and explored all the possibilities. Back when I lived with my parents I could usually do the WBTB method without an alarm clock because I used to go to bed at 2 and my parents started making noise at 8, which woke me up exactly 6 hours after going to sleep.
I learned to warp around in dreams and my method to "reality check" was looking at my hand in the dream, which I learned about in a lucid dreaming online community.

But now I don't practice it anymore either. Barely got enough time to sleep more than 8 hours each day. *tired sigh*

What. the. fuck. You're like the male version of myself. Stay outta my way. :ph34r:

Sol4rplexus
12-18-2014, 06:38 AM
Do you like to think about the possible meaning of your dreams?

Yes, but not in the sense you mean with this question. What I like to do is figure out what event in my day turned into what. There are plenty of times where I can point to a particular motif and say "Aha. That's because I've been doing XYZ". I think that's a useful thing to observe. Ironically, such observations are also useful for the sort of interpretation the question intends--provided you recognize that the dream is simply telling you where you're subconscious is focused and don't take an oracular route.
Lulz. What you just explained is exactly how I meant it! :lol: (And I do the same thing.)


What. the. fuck. You're like the male version of myself. Stay outta my way. :ph34r:
I'll take that as a compliment. x)

jigglypuff
12-18-2014, 10:54 PM
sometimes it happens to me and if i'm lucky i wake up remembering it.

just now i remembered having a lucid dream about pulsating, abstract forms. i was moving the forms with my mind. i love that sort of freedom and power.

i've been thinking about doing the dream journal. i used to, but stopped. now i don't take my sleep seriously enough, but that should change.


My method is the "wake back to bed" method. I go to sleep with a task and I wake up in my bed, still dreaming.
this sounds so interesting but what does this even mean? lol. well, that's something for me to research...

Light Leak
12-19-2014, 06:08 AM
Do you value your nightly dreams?
Yes. I don't dream much anymore - at least I don't remember dreaming. So if I remember I a dream I value it.


Do they inspire you for creative projects (writings, drawings, movies)?
No. But when I was in art school I used to dream about projects I was doing and I would frequently wake up all excited thinking I came up with something awesome in my dream only to find out that it didn't work IRL. The stuff I would dream up would defy the laws of nature and stuff. Made perfect sense in my dream, but once I woke up it didn't make sense anymore.


Are your dreams clear or blurry?
Dreams are clear when I dream them, but my memories of them are often fuzzy.


Do you tell friends about them?
I tell my husband sometimes. Or post some here.


Do you like to think about the possible meaning of your dreams?
A little. I don't think about it too much. Most of the time it's pretty clear that my dreams are inspired by stuff in my life.


Do you have a dream journal?
I used to. Not anymore.


And are there any lucid dreamers amongst you?
Not me... I don't think. I've had an occasional dream where I've suddenly become aware that I'm dreaming, but I always wake up the instant I have that realization. Unless it's a sleep paralysis dream and then I struggle to wake up, but that only happen maybe once a year now. I used to get sleep paralysis every night for a period of time as a teenager.

Sol4rplexus
12-19-2014, 09:24 PM
this sounds so interesting but what does this even mean? lol. well, that's something for me to research...
It's hard to describe, you kinda need to have experienced it to fully understand it.
If you go to sleep after waking up 6 hours after going to sleep, your body's fall-asleep-mechanism will have a high chance to malfunction - you'll end up in sleep paralysis while being awake and start dreaming in this state. Now you have two possibilities: Stop the paralysis, or stop being awake. If you do the latter, your head might create an imaginary world around you that looks like a copy of your bedroom, with minor differences to the real room, such as higher contrasts, minor blurs, and darker colors. Also your hand will usually have more than 5 fingers, if you look at it. This imaginary place your brain sends you to can be mistaken for being awake, which can be a scary experience for people who stumble upon this phenomena by accident.
Hope that was helpful.

Madrigal
12-19-2014, 09:37 PM
this sounds so interesting but what does this even mean? lol. well, that's something for me to research...

You can do this even if you don't suffer from sleep paralysis.

A key element is to go to sleep with the determination that you will become conscious of your dream. The best way for me is to lie on my back (not on your side or any more comfortable position) during the day in a room I know I won't be woken up in (disconnect your phone). Go to sleep thinking of your task of becoming lucid in your dream. Set your alarm clock to ring two hours into it so that it interrupts your sleep. This is because you'll fail to gain lucidity, you'll just fall asleep. But shutting off the alarm clock and going back to sleep will serve as a reminder of your task. All this is assuming you're a heavy sleeper that can fall right back asleep from an interruption like that.

After you "remind" yourself you'll be entering a dream very soon, you're more likely to realize you're dreaming when you enter your dream state again. Dreams are sort of like real life in this sense; if you wake up one day and tell yourself you need to buy a lightbulb for the kitchen, you're not gonna be thinking about that all day but at some point you'll probably remember you had to buy that lightbulb. Dreams are a lot like that. If you're lucky, you'll "wake back to bed" - dream that you're opening your eyes in bed, seeing your room, looking at your palm, etc, maybe you can do what I do and just fly away right there. But you might also gain lucidity in the middle of a dream that's happening in a whole other dream setting. When you gain lucidity you need to do something that will stop the reflex of waking up. That is looking at your palm. I don't know why it works, but it just does. It pulls you into the dream and you can start having your adventures in it. In my dreams, I can use my palm for other things too, as if it had a special energy in it.

You might not succeed in your first attempts, and you might have to spend a few weeks doing "reality checks" (asking yourself if you're dreaming and performing an action that doesn't work in dreams) before you're finally doing a reality check in a dream. But like I said, it's just like anything else you remind yourself to do. At some point, you remember.

Sistamatic
12-19-2014, 09:39 PM
I dreamed I lifted weights and woke up with sore muscles. What kind of dreaming is that?

jigglypuff
12-19-2014, 09:44 PM
Sol4rplexus Madrigal
interesting, thanks. i've def experienced lucid dreaming before, as well as something that's like waking up in bed and starting my day where i can't tell whether i've stopped my alarm irl or in the dream... i've never deliberately tried to enter that state, tho.

how long does the "adventure" feel? for me when it's happened it doesn't last very long (in dream time). once i become aware i know i'm waking up soon. i'll try looking into my palm but i wonder if there is another way to draw me into the dream.

after a lucid dreaming session, do you feel well-rested after?

Madrigal
12-19-2014, 09:50 PM
how long does the "adventure" feel? for me when it's happened it doesn't last very long (in dream time). once i become aware i know i'm waking up soon. i'll try looking into my palm but i wonder if there is another way to draw me into the dream.

They don't last very long for me, as in, I can't actually go to all sorts of places without waking up. Sometimes something weird will start happening and I'll force myself to wake up. Or I'll get bored or frustrated and wake myself up. Sometimes I'll feel like the lucidity is fading and I can't stop it. But I don't wake up before I've tried going somewhere or doing something interesting.


after a lucid dreaming session, do you feel well-rested after?

Yes, you feel like your mind is crisp and clean like a spring morning. You know those mornings when you can hear and smell everything. For me it feels like it wakes up your senses and your mind can process things much faster. If you try to read something challenging after a lucid dream, you may find that you can speed right through it, even a couple of hours later. I don't remember waking up from them and feeling tired or sluggish or anything like that.

jigglypuff
12-19-2014, 10:01 PM
They don't last very long for me, as in, I can't actually go to all sorts of places without waking up. Sometimes something weird will start happening and I'll force myself to wake up. Or I'll get bored or frustrated and wake myself up. Sometimes I'll feel like the lucidity is fading and I can't stop it. But I don't wake up before I've tried going somewhere or doing something interesting.



Yes, you feel like your mind is crisp and clean like a spring morning. You know those mornings when you can hear and smell everything. For me it feels like it wakes up your senses and your mind can process things much faster. If you try to read something challenging after a lucid dream, you may find that you can speed right through it, even a couple of hours later. I don't remember waking up from them and feeling tired or sluggish or anything like that.
i'll have to try this. my lucid moments are like that, too. i'll try to do something cool cuz i know it's ending soon.

another question: how successful are you in entering that state, when you try?

EDIT: ok another: how successful are you in remembering your lucid dreams? how vivid is the memory? i'm curious.

i'm only concerned about the alarm 2 hrs into sleeping thing. my body already habitually wakes itself up at around 3 or 4 am if i go to sleep around midnight, and i'm used to actually getting out of bed then. :/ it's really bad. i can't say i'm a heavy sleeper for that reason, but idk. i guess i'll see once my body falls into a more regular sleep schedule, like how it is when my life is meticulously scheduled during the waking day.

btw i don't know if i've ever experienced sleep paralysis. when people have described it to me, i can't recall ever having that, so probably not.

Madrigal
12-19-2014, 10:05 PM
i'll have to try this.

another question: how successful are you in entering that state, when you try?

I think it took me a couple of months of reality-checking and recording my dreams before I started lucid dreaming, but I didn't use the wake-back-to-bed system in the beginning. Later on I was almost always successful when I tried the afternoon naps. If you're not a heavy sleeper then I don't think you should waste your time doing the naps thing. You can achieve the same result of becoming lucid by going to sleep with a dream task (my task was that I'd realize I was dreaming and I'd go to a certain landmark here and meet someone I knew and tell them a secret word and ask for their secret word), performing daily reality checks and trying to remember as much of your dream as possible when you wake up (getting into the habit of remembering your dreams seems to help).

Doing reality checks, etc., doesn't really seem like work, but you'd be surprised at how easy it is to forget the whole thing and lose any consistency in doing those simple tasks on a daily basis.



EDIT: ok another: how successful are you in remembering your lucid dreams? how vivid is the memory? i'm curious.

I can usually remember some of it when I wake up. But I remember more when I'm trying on a daily basis, as if it were a muscle you were exercising. One person I know swore she never remembered her dreams but she began having very vivid ones when she tried this experiment with me. She also finally had a lucid dream. But she saw herself sleeping and freaked out and stopped the experiment. I never once looked down to see myself sleeping because I know I'd freak out.

Sol4rplexus
12-20-2014, 07:44 PM
I looked down and didn't see myself sleeping, and I looked in mirrors and saw myself, nothing was weird or off.

Madrigal
12-22-2014, 12:45 AM
I looked down and didn't see myself sleeping, and I looked in mirrors and saw myself, nothing was weird or off.

Hmm. I probably won't try looking down, heh. I did look in a mirror once, and the face in the mirror was making a different expression from me. I looked into the mirror first with curiosity and then fear. She was looking at me in a smug, vindictive way. I freaked the hell out.

Sol4rplexus
12-22-2014, 09:39 PM
Hmm. I probably won't try looking down, heh. I did look in a mirror once, and the face in the mirror was making a different expression from me. I looked into the mirror first with curiosity and then fear. She was looking at me in a smug, vindictive way. I freaked the hell out.

Fear can distort your dreams, so be optimistic when you start to dream and remember: courage equals invincibility in a lucid dream.

Ptah
12-31-2014, 01:37 AM
Do you value your nightly dreams?
I hardly ever remember them. Even so, no.

Do they inspire you for creative projects (writings, drawings, movies)?
No. I have daydreams for that.

Are your dreams clear or blurry?
A mix of clear bits in a blurry slurry.

Do you tell friends about them?
No. None of their business. Moreover, hardly likely to be of any interest to them.

Do you like to think about the possible meaning of your dreams?
Apart from how it might reflect certain somatic states, subtle, sublime (qua neurological) or otherwise -- nope. Brain static.

Do you have a dream journal?
Not worth it. I hardly remember any dreams.

And are there any lucid dreamers amongst you?

Yup. Among the few dreams I do have/remember, they are always lucid or wind up lucid by the end. They also almost always involve the dream of waking up from the preceding dream, lucid but not actually aware I'm still in a dream (if that makes any sense). Complete with going through my morning routine, etc. Things go off the rails when the ontological shock hits that my lucid dreaming powers still work in what I think is reality-awakened-to. I usually thereafter awaken feeling as if I'd been dropped into the bed.

Fun.

Grape Jelly
01-19-2015, 06:02 AM
My dreams tell my future. Some are nonsense when i have sodium overload. I had a dream of garbage asteroids hitting me, and a mothership. There was planets in the sky. I did overeat last night. I would put that in the ladder. I had a dream i was getting abducted a couple months ago. Woke up with intense chills. I rarely have those dreams though. Speaking of art. Maybe im suppose make a video game about aliens. Sorry if off topic.

LordLatch
01-19-2015, 06:16 AM
Speaking of art. Maybe im suppose make a video game about aliens. Sorry if off topic.

For what platform in what language?

Grape Jelly
01-19-2015, 06:27 AM
Fps in english. Just a practice game, then im working on a rpg. What about you. Sorry i cant check my control panel on this phone.

LordLatch
01-19-2015, 06:43 AM
Fps in english. Just a practice game, then im working on a rpg. What about you. Sorry i cant check my control panel on this phone.

I was writing games for Android, but I'm past that for now.

Grape Jelly
01-19-2015, 07:09 AM
Yeah i write also. I wrote the dialogue, and the music. I might use unity.

jigglypuff
01-20-2015, 06:03 PM
since starting the dream journal, i feel like i've been remembering more and/or my dreams are getting more vivid & detailed especially in the realm of emotions. feeling powerful, witnessing others' anguish, etc.

v interesting so far. if i can connect anything to waking life, it's information suggesting to me to continue what i'm doing or change something.

jigglypuff
01-28-2015, 06:21 AM
i had a weird inception-type sorta-lucid dream the other day. i was dreaming in my dream and became lucid, but only at the first level of my dream. i remember thinking in that level 2 dream "ok, now that i know i'm dreaming, i can do whatever i want now" and i distinctly remember being in front of elevator doors either opening or closing right at that moment. it didn't last very long and i couldn't actually control my actions (although i remember thinking about this thread and about Madrigal lol) but i was sorta watching myself, if that makes any sense. i had to wake from that level 2 dream to wake from my actual level 1 dream.

tiny progress?

BarIII
02-14-2015, 07:50 PM
1.Do you value your nightly dreams?
No

2.Do they inspire you for creative projects (writings, drawings, movies)?
Dreamed of a tune a couple of times in my life and wished I wrote music. Otherwise, no.

3.Are your dreams clear or blurry?
I rarely notice. IDK

4.Do you tell friends about them?
No

5.Do you like to think about the possible meaning of your dreams?
"Like" is too strong a word. Sometimes I think about it for a minute. I don't consider it useful.

6.Do you have a dream journal?
No

7.And are there any lucid dreamers amongst you?
Me! Not often but I've been an occasional lucid dreamer since I was a kid. I've woken myself up too, on purpose.

Madrigal
05-31-2015, 11:11 PM
Yesterday night I was trying to wake up but I was too tired to achieve it, so I started practising dream control and reset my dream four times.

Each time I reset the dream I was plunged into darkness with just some distant stars around me, and I'd wait for a desired scenario to materialize. I visited a couple of dream characters and asked them questions. One character wasn't summoned voluntarily but I interrogated her as well. She was an old woman with one blind eye. I asked, "Does he remember my name?" And she replied, "Will you remember yours?" I didn't reply but instead looked into my palm to reset the dream again.

jigglypuff
10-09-2015, 04:58 PM
sleep paralysis finally happened to me and it wasn't that scary cuz i knew exactly what was going on, but it was extremely unpleasant. i approached it like how you see some people approach communicating with spirits or something, just being open to it. right before it happened i pulled my blanket over me and focused on how safe and comfortable it was. then in the pitch black all i wanted was to turn my head and turn on the light, but i couldn't. this felt like it lasted quite a while, and it felt bad not being able to "wake up" (it came with no visions, thank gawd). considering the pitch black, i was afraid of where my mind would take me if i couldn't wake up in time cuz basically i felt completely awake/lucid and i could still reason. i did eventually wake up, or it just shifted, and i'm not sure if i turned on the light in between. this only happened cuz i was specifically thinking of it and open to it, so that's probably why it didn't freak me out that much, cuz i'd put myself in an open psychological state right before. i had a fucked up dream after i went back to sleep, though.