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wyzandrea
10-20-2015, 09:31 AM
I am a woman, I don't eat so much. In order to look thinner, I hope to eat less and less. But how much should we eat correctly that I can keep thin and healthy both.

Catoptric
10-20-2015, 10:16 AM
Though I'm hardly health conscious apart from having vitamin supplements presorted in baggies that I take most days, the most I advise:

Drink plenty of water (use a reverse osmosis filter as all public water is contaminated with disgusting crap and parasites and should be remineralized with something like ConcenTrace supplement,) perhaps add some Green Superfood powder (http://www.amazon.com/Amazing-Grass-SuperFood-Original-Servings/dp/B00112ILZM). Most of the time when people are hungry they are actually dehydrated, and most always hunger is a state of mind caused by behavior dependency. Eating sufficiently healthy is sufficient, while avoiding unhealthy foods that acidify the body (I would actually like to point out that tomatoes are a good alkalizing food.) Some would swear by the health benefits of juicing their own vegetables, and you should avoid most common store-bought juices. If practical grow your own garden (but most people will fail at that for various reasons and the time it takes to establish a garden.)

Also if getting into the habit of buying vegetables and fruit, it's a good idea to have a method of cleaning them. Use vinegar dissolved in water and simply leave them in a large container. Rinse and scrub the remaining surfaces, and see the nasty crap left in the water bath. Dry them of course and try to keep some of the stuff separate as it will cause ripening when not needed. Tomatoes are better not refrigerated, and spinach and lettuce in organic tubs often requires no cleaning (so I prefer those.)

Complex carbs, or proteins (try to avoid meat when you can, but eat Atlantic caught fish if you do), and vitamin supplements. Try not to eat anything prepackaged in a grocery store (though perhaps some things like frozen convenience food is good) which oftentimes becomes the main food supply if you're not careful. Most of the stuff is never healthy.

Also don't get into the habit of buying bottled water. It is far better to produce "waste water" from reverse osmosis filtration (which can be re-purposed for other things, than to buy disgusting plastic bottled water which creates far more waste and pollution,) not to mention it has synthetic chemicals that leach into the water itself (mostly when stored for periods of time at higher temps). Try to also use hydrogen peroxide in the water if you plan to have it left around a bit (preferably in glass bottles), and don't mix powder drink mix in the storing bottles as it will almost always produce bacterial and fungal growth, and is a mess to mix with.

Increase a resting metabolic rate through exercise is a good idea (the vast majority don't have a sufficient resting metabolism and are into pork orgies.)

Limes
10-20-2015, 10:46 AM
I eat the correct amount of food every day, I never make mistake, unlike mainland Chinese trying to form an orderly queue and wait their turn.

Perdix
10-20-2015, 01:05 PM
I'm going for body fat loss at the moment and I skip breakfast, always, I have a prescription for adderall and it works way better than coffee -- and fuck you (pop myth) dinner is the most important meal of the day.

That being said, I eat somewhere below 2k calories per day in: chicken, rice, veggies, teriyaki sauce, beer, protein shakes, vodka, jager and pizza (this is just what I eat throughout the week). Alcohol included in that 2k, I count cals. That's my main diet, plus a multivitamin to cover any deficiencies.

First, calculate your bmr: http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bmr_calculator.htm

Mine is around 3k calories, so right now I run a 800 cal deficit (I might forget a beer, so I go on the low side). I do 20-30 min HIIT cardio as much as times allows, on average three times a week, but you can go up to five safely I've been told. I lift "light" meaning reduction in volume and weight by around 30% for me.

If you need to lose weight subtract 500 cals from your diet (bmr) (if you're smaller, try 300 cals first) daily and you'll lose around a pound of weight per week. Some fat some muscle, mostly fat though unless you have really shitty genetics or an actual medical condition. If you exercise eat more to compensate, but try to maintain a deficit. Repeat until you get what your going for. Take walks if you can't run, wheel yourself around the block if you can't walk. Do some military crawls if you just can't use a wheelchair. The main point here is that you should add some light cardio if you want to lose weight. Lifting is less important IMO, but free weights never hurt anyone, aside from use as a weapon, or lifting way too much weight. Free weights activate more stabilizer muscles than machines, you must fight the urge to use machines only.

There is no fast magic burning fat pill that, my newbie friend, is a closely guarded secret.

Do a simple diagnostic test and tell me how many proper form wide arm military pushups you can do in ten minutes, PROPER FORM. (btw, one up one down is one pushup in my book outside ROTC)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nZBx00BMWo

You do not get a pass to use your knees because you are a woman

It's a fantastic exercise and one I promote heavily.

Also, stretching. Stretch! Do not forgo this, and eat some bananas for the potassium to prevent cramping if you do low-intensity long length cardio (the worst for fat lost IME).

I know this is more than you asked for, but I tried to answer any possible underlying questions. Feel free to correct me health brahs @joft (http://forums.intpcomplex.com/member.php?u=96) @stuck (http://forums.intpcomplex.com/member.php?u=52) @Neville (http://forums.intpcomplex.com/member.php?u=25)

Sistamatic
10-20-2015, 05:43 PM
The number I eat has nothing to do with you. Caloric needs are based on a number of metrics including lean muscle mass, age, weight, and gender...and most importantly, activity level. There are a number of online calculators that can help you. MyFitnessPal is a good way to monitor this if you don't want to wear an activity tracker.

I bought the the Fitbit Charge HR a week ago. It monitors my heartrate constantly and uses that data, plus my age, height, weight and gender to inform me how many calories I can eat in a day. If I set it at medium intensity weight loss, it keeps me at a 500 calorie per day deficit. A week into strict calorie counting along with 30 minutes daily of intense cardio and some upper body calisthenics and weight work has netted me a four pound weight loss out of the 20 total that I need to lose.

I always eat breakfast because I feel like crap if I don't. YMMV.

Sistamatic
10-20-2015, 05:50 PM
You do not get a pass to use your knees because you are a woman



Please. As if I would. :rofl:

I can only do about 11 in a row right now, but given that I couldn't do one a week ago, I think I'm doing good. (If you can't do one, do slow negatives, not knee pushups to get yourself back in shape. And do a few slow negatives when you reach failure on your real pushups to improve faster.)

Go back in time to when I was in my late 20s...I could do one armed pushups pretty much indefinitely. I was a regular GI Jane. Oh how the mighty have fallen. :sadbanana:

I don't know how many I can do 10 minutes. brb.

Edit: 44
I could not get number 45 even with 20 seconds of rest. I rested a full minute after the timer was up and tried again for a 45th. No dice, so I did a few negatives. Coincidentally, 44 is my age.
btw, thanks for the inspiration. I may do as many as I can in ten minutes every other day...great way to work on pushups. Ask again in a month.

stuck
10-20-2015, 08:20 PM
First, calculate your bmr: http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bmr_calculator.htm

Your BMR is the amount of calories you would burn if you were bedridden. Your TDEE, or Total Daily Energy Expenditure, is what you want to calculate.

Here's a calculator that will tell you what "macros" (protein, carbs, fat) you might want to eat, in grams/day, to achieve a particular goal.

http://iifym.com/iifym-calculator/

joft
10-20-2015, 11:08 PM
I eat close to 3k calories. Apparently anywhere from 2700-3100 will keep my weight stable. My bodyweight refuses to budge from ~172ish. I tried to bulk for a while and it just stayed constant. I tried to cut for a while and it only went to about ~168.

I'll start another bulk in a few weeks and try like 3200 calories and see how that goes

scarydoor
10-20-2015, 11:43 PM
I can't comprehend how people are able to count the calories they eat each day. I really don't understand that. I could never be organised enough for it, and it seems like quite an estimate, with a *lot* of variables going on. Just seems like a complete fantasy, to be honest. It could work a little bit, to lose weight, but perhaps that's just because you've been motivated to eat a little less for a while.

A few years ago I found myself at 93.8kg (184cm). I'd learnt to cook lasagna very well and had been eating double servings each night for a while. I decided to stop that. Generally I just tried to eat a little less. More "normal". I pretty much cut out meat. Reduced milk and cheese. I weighed myself each morning, at pretty much the exact same time, before my shower, without clothes. I wrote down the number. I observed general trends. I think that having a weight for every day is best, because more data is better. I started to get an intuitive feel for what foods gave me a good amount of energy but would not add a lot of weight. So I just went for them. After about a year I was down to 71-72kg. A gradual loss. It was perfect. I think it was an average of perhaps 500g - 1kg / week. I can't really remember. I wasn't in a race to lose it (another ridiculous trend at the moment).

These days I'm quite won over by carbohydrates. I eat enough of those so that I'm not tired during the day. So I eat fairly large portions of pasta. I'd guess about 180-200g of dried pasta per meal, plus the sauce and all of that. In addition I eat whatever other natural foods I feel like: fruit and whatever. I've started cutting out milk and cheese completely. That's gotten rid of a lot of fat too. Hips and lower chest area are getting quite fat free.

Limes
10-20-2015, 11:52 PM
I typically only eat 2-3 times per day. If I'm working onsite, then it's often less, especially if I don't have much space (cube farm) and my only option is a busy downtown area.
I've been working from home a lot more lately, which makes eating a hell of a lot easier. This will generally just increase the amount of snacking that I do.

FWIW, a lot of fairly healthy food coincides to being my favorite foods, I've always preferred margarine/spread over butter and my favorite food since a teen had been whole grain cereals.

The worst thing that I do is probably consuming a lot of sugar. I mean a lot. I will put 5 spoons into a cup of tea, a table spoon onto already sweetened cereal.
I've really been taking advantage of my metabolism.

Hephaestus
10-21-2015, 12:40 AM
Depends. What's available?

I don't store up food because I tend to graze.

Pan_Sonic_000
10-21-2015, 12:51 AM
I recently bumped my baseline to 3,000 calories a day. But I'm probably getting around 3,300 a lot of the time 'cause I'll put onions and tomatoes on my rice, have a cup of coffee with 2 french vanilla packets, eat a donut at work, etc. It really all seems to come out in the wash over time regardless of the daily +/- variance.

I'm lean as fuck right now; about 162 lbs or something. I don't like it, despite having a fair amount of muscle. I only did it because I was just fucking tired of eating big to bulk up, but then becoming a fucking fatass in the process. So I decided once and for all, to shed almost all my excess fat and then just lift without having to worry about it. It's working great so far.

Sistamatic
10-21-2015, 02:23 AM
I can't comprehend how people are able to count the calories they eat each day. I really don't understand that. I could never be organised enough for it, and it seems like quite an estimate, with a *lot* of variables going on. Just seems like a complete fantasy, to be honest. It could work a little bit, to lose weight, but perhaps that's just because you've been motivated to eat a little less for a while.

If I didn't have the tech for it, it would be pretty daunting. I just scan the barcode of what I'm eating, or do a search in the database. I keep a little scale in the kitchen to help figure out serving sizes. I create custom entries that encompass whole meals that I eat fairly regularly. I err on the side of counting too many calories if I'm unsure...that way I can't fuck up my goal of weight loss. The app that does the scanning is the same app that goes with my wrist worn heart rate/movement/step tracker. It automagically determines how many calories I've burned, and when I enter my food, it automagically tells me how many calories I can still eat if I want to stay within budget. All I have to do is take the time when I fix my food or sit down to eat to enter it all in. Once you have the hang of it, it isn't bad. It just requires commitment, and as long as it is working, I really don't mind.

Madrigal
10-21-2015, 04:12 AM
About 1200 calories (three meals and two snacks). I switched to healthy food on September 1 (along with other changes) but that's just so I can wear a bikini climb a mountain soon.

Ideally 2000 and eating tons of pasta, fried foods and frappucinos. :unsure:

Linnea
10-21-2015, 01:21 PM
I don't eat so much. In order to look thinner, I hope to eat less and less.

Am I the only one who finds this bit a little alarming?


But how much should we eat correctly that I can keep thin and healthy both.

There's no one correct way to eat. What works for someone else might not work for you. What kind of foods do you eat at the moment? Are they healthy and nutritious? Do you eat a lot of convenience food?

My recommendation is to start changing your diet one thing at a time. You will slowly get used to it and gradual changes are more likely to stick than one huge drastic diet overhaul.

I would recommend IF or NoS (http://www.nosdiet.com/) over calorie counting just because I find it easier to remember to follow a simple rule than consistently write down what I eat.

Perdix
10-21-2015, 04:31 PM
Please. As if I would. :rofl:

I can only do about 11 in a row right now, but given that I couldn't do one a week ago, I think I'm doing good. (If you can't do one, do slow negatives, not knee pushups to get yourself back in shape. And do a few slow negatives when you reach failure on your real pushups to improve faster.)

Go back in time to when I was in my late 20s...I could do one armed pushups pretty much indefinitely. I was a regular GI Jane. Oh how the mighty have fallen. :sadbanana:

I don't know how many I can do 10 minutes. brb.

Edit: 44
I could not get number 45 even with 20 seconds of rest. I rested a full minute after the timer was up and tried again for a 45th. No dice, so I did a few negatives. Coincidentally, 44 is my age.
btw, thanks for the inspiration. I may do as many as I can in ten minutes every other day...great way to work on pushups. Ask again in a month.

Shit, meant to get to this post sooner. Better late than never right?

Didn't mean to direct that towards women in general, men using their knees is also a problem IMO. It's just generally referred to as a "girl pushup", probably should rename it to "modified pushup", two women just graduated ranger school, so yeah, I'm reconsidering a lot of things. I didn't think it was biologically possible, but I did support it about a year ago on the "Women in the military thread".

44 pushups puts you in the "Excellent health" category, every other day is a good way to go about it, but I wrecked my shoulder eight months ago when I was cranking out as many pushups as I could do every other day -- don't go too fast, even if you can jump from 44 to 120+ within a week. I'm sure you're clued in on workout recovery so I'll shut up now.

Perdix
10-21-2015, 04:41 PM
Your BMR is the amount of calories you would burn if you were bedridden. Your TDEE, or Total Daily Energy Expenditure, is what you want to calculate.

Here's a calculator that will tell you what "macros" (protein, carbs, fat) you might want to eat, in grams/day, to achieve a particular goal.

http://iifym.com/iifym-calculator/

Yep, I messed up there. That website told me 3200 cals for maintenance, and 2350 for "reckless" weight loss... I think I need to up my calories in order to lose less muscle and more fat. Now to the real question, do I use those extra calories for lean protein or alcohol?

@scarydoor (http://forums.intpcomplex.com/member.php?u=62)

It's really easy if you have a routine diet and prep food in advance. My freezer is full of pre-cooked teriyaki chicken and veggies.

scarydoor
10-21-2015, 06:00 PM
@scarydoor (http://forums.intpcomplex.com/member.php?u=62)

It's really easy if you have a routine diet and prep food in advance. My freezer is full of pre-cooked teriyaki chicken and veggies.

What kind of INTP are you, sticking to a routine like that? I eat similar things, but it can wildly fluctuate. Any data I could possibly collect would be worthless. And even if you could have an accurate count of number of calories you've consumed, I don't think it would mean all that much. Food companies do all sorts of things to get calorie numbers low to get people to buy them. In the end they're filled with weird chemicals that will give you cancer. But even if you do stick to natural food, calories act differently inside the body depending on what the food is. E.g. pasta, or meat or fruit, is going to be used differently by the body. In what way? I don't know. I don't know if it's particularly practical to analyse that. I actually think that this attempt to micromanage our food, by applying simplified numbers and formulae to things, is a major thing that keeps people fat and makes people fat. The only benefit I can see is that it gives people some kind of metric to figure out how much they've eaten. But the metric is also so flawed. I think people would be so much better off to just eat natural food, in balanced proportions (get a good variety), and adjust the amounts you eat so that you're not getting tired throughout the day by literally starving yourself, but you're also gradually losing some small amount of weight, or staying the same.

Sistamatic
10-21-2015, 06:05 PM
Shit, meant to get to this post sooner. Better late than never right?

Didn't mean to direct that towards women in general, men using their knees is also a problem IMO. It's just generally referred to as a "girl pushup", probably should rename it to "modified pushup", two women just graduated ranger school, so yeah, I'm reconsidering a lot of things. I didn't think it was biologically possible, but I did support it about a year ago on the "Women in the military thread".

44 pushups puts you in the "Excellent health" category, every other day is a good way to go about it, but I wrecked my shoulder eight months ago when I was cranking out as many pushups as I could do every other day -- don't go too fast, even if you can jump from 44 to 120+ within a week. I'm sure you're clued in on workout recovery so I'll shut up now.

Men are, on average, have greater strength potential than women, but The bell curves have extreme overlap. I think the reason so many people (men and women) underestimate the women's strength potential is because most humans don't reach their potential anything without a good reason, and women have less incentive to reach for their potential strength and endurance. No matter your genetics, you don't get strong unless you use your muscles. The limits of female endurance and strength are largely unexplored...and now that we are starting to, we are realizing that our assumptions about women have been flawed all along. Imagine if you went through life expected to ask someone else to do all the heavy lifting...how would you ever become strong.

Sistamatic
10-21-2015, 06:16 PM
Am I the only one who finds this bit a little alarming?



There's no one correct way to eat. What works for someone else might not work for you. What kind of foods do you eat at the moment? Are they healthy and nutritious? Do you eat a lot of convenience food?

My recommendation is to start changing your diet one thing at a time. You will slowly get used to it and gradual changes are more likely to stick than one huge drastic diet overhaul.

I would recommend IF or NoS (http://www.nosdiet.com/) over calorie counting just because I find it easier to remember to follow a simple rule than consistently write down what I eat.

Good point.

I'd just add this: wyzandrea, these weight loss plans being discussed here all assume that you need to lose weight to be at a healthy body weight. Below a certain threshold, there is no healthy way to lose body weight.

If you are in the underfat zone on the chart below and you still feel as though you need to lose weight to look good, you should see a therapist and ask them how you can begin to feel good about your weight without harmful dieting.

http://media.tanita.com/data/Image/content/BodyFatRangeChartLarge.jpg?rev=3C8B

stuck
10-21-2015, 06:18 PM
Thank god they're doing bodyfat as opposed to BMI now, that made the issue extremely muddy for everyone.

I'm gonna start using the word "overfat" now.

Blorg
10-21-2015, 06:30 PM
I don't count calories anymore so I don't know. I don't follow a regular meal schedule because my lesson times are erratic. I'd estimate that I take in about 1800 calories a day, give or take. I've undoubtedly gained a lot of weight but I stay away from scales.

When depressed I used to take advantage of my low appetite and, at my worst, I ate less than 400 calories a day, sometimes nothing at all. On that "diet," I couldn't stand without feeling dizzy, but paradoxically, I had endless physical energy and could walk all night. My life was in shambles, so when I went a few days at a time with nothing but water in my stomach and my body didn't send hunger signals, that felt like a form of control and I clung to it. I also got into a habit of half-seriously trying to teach myself not to breathe anymore, holding my breath for as long as possible. Basically I was set on learning how to die.

About two years ago I started bumping up my caloric intake, originally without intent - my body demanded it - and eventually on purpose. I was devastated by guilt on my new 700 calorie diet, which usually consisted of some rice and eggs with butter, and maybe some fruit. I laid awake at night counting and recounting the calories in the meals of the day, chastising myself for eating anything more than two eggs. Sometimes I would "binge" - ie, eat a normal amount for my bmi - and panic. While at 700 calories, I tried to start school again, but my emotions were haywire. Starvation fucks with your adrenaline. I knew this and I bumped my intake up to 1200 calories, which wasn't enough to sustain my mind and emotional health. I dropped out and slowly returned to a normal diet. I stopped counting calories and weighing myself. I still get the urge to starve and I feel guilty when I eat, but those things don't interfere with my life anymore.

Short answer, probably 1800 calories a day.

Perdix
10-21-2015, 06:32 PM
What kind of INTP are you, sticking to a routine like that? I eat similar things, but it can wildly fluctuate. Any data I could possibly collect would be worthless. And even if you could have an accurate count of number of calories you've consumed, I don't think it would mean all that much. Food companies do all sorts of things to get calorie numbers low to get people to buy them. In the end they're filled with weird chemicals that will give you cancer. But even if you do stick to natural food, calories act differently inside the body depending on what the food is. E.g. pasta, or meat or fruit, is going to be used differently by the body. In what way? I don't know.

I don't know if it's particularly practical to analyse that. I actually think that this attempt to micromanage our food, by applying simplified numbers and formulae to things, is a major thing that keeps people fat and makes people fat. The only benefit I can see is that it gives people some kind of metric to figure out how much they've eaten. But the metric is also so flawed.

I think people would be so much better off to just eat natural food, in balanced proportions (get a good variety), and adjust the amounts you eat so that you're not getting tired throughout the day by literally starving yourself, but you're also gradually losing some small amount of weight, or staying the same.

Pretty please use paragraphs? Blocks of text are really hard to read.

Well... it's worked for me and many others... it's simple math. BTW, I'm a rouge INTP... I don't have to follow their rules, see "type" below my avatar. As far as keeping people "fat" because they can't count calories, those are people that aren't actually counting calories, or are omitting snacks and other caloric sources.

You're not one of those people obsessed with "natural food" and "organic" bullshit are you?


Men are, on average, have greater strength potential than women, but The bell curves have extreme overlap. I think the reason so many people (men and women) underestimate the women's strength potential is because most humans don't reach their potential anything without a good reason, and women have less incentive to reach for their potential strength and endurance. No matter your genetics, you don't get strong unless you use your muscles. The limits of female endurance and strength are largely unexplored...and now that we are starting to, we are realizing that our assumptions about women have been flawed all along. Imagine if you went through life expected to ask someone else to do all the heavy lifting...how would you ever become strong.

I agree, the bell curves definitely overlap. I know some extraordinary female athletes, but becoming a ranger is on a whole other level. I think it takes a certain genetic makeup to make it through any high endurance/strength training for the military (special forces), and that genetic makeup might be less prevalent in women -- IDK, that's what my intuition is telling me, but I'm genuinely curious. Your last point is salient and rings true.

*Edit you're>your.. this should be subconscious by now. I plead guilty but am using drinking last night as a defense.

Sistamatic
10-21-2015, 06:33 PM
What kind of INTP are you, sticking to a routine like that? I eat similar things, but it can wildly fluctuate. Any data I could possibly collect would be worthless. And even if you could have an accurate count of number of calories you've consumed, I don't think it would mean all that much. Food companies do all sorts of things to get calorie numbers low to get people to buy them. In the end they're filled with weird chemicals that will give you cancer. But even if you do stick to natural food, calories act differently inside the body depending on what the food is. E.g. pasta, or meat or fruit, is going to be used differently by the body. In what way? I don't know. I don't know if it's particularly practical to analyse that. I actually think that this attempt to micromanage our food, by applying simplified numbers and formulae to things, is a major thing that keeps people fat and makes people fat. The only benefit I can see is that it gives people some kind of metric to figure out how much they've eaten. But the metric is also so flawed. I think people would be so much better off to just eat natural food, in balanced proportions (get a good variety), and adjust the amounts you eat so that you're not getting tired throughout the day by literally starving yourself, but you're also gradually losing some small amount of weight, or staying the same.

If I start getting too technical about what I need to eat, I'll get frustrated and stop trying. I don't have a plan, just a limit. Feed myself whatever food and log it (the bar code scanner in the app is awesome) as best I can until the meter is full, then stop eating until the next day. I rely on intuition for nutritional content. Having a limit causes me to make better decisions automatically...no need to chart the course ahead of time. Like when I was in college living on 900 bucks a month stipend, there were certain things I just didn't spend money on. No one had to tell me I couldn't crank the heat and still pay my gas bill, I just knew.

Calorie counting is hard if you are doing it by hand. I could not count calories without my tech. I just couldn't bring myself to.

Dieting is just about living within calorie budget while making a daily small payment back on the debt incurred earlier. My tech keeps track of the numbers for me....how much I'm earning and how much I'm spending is available to me on my wrist in real time all day.

It gamifies dieting...if someone is willing to click buttons to gather herbs all day in the game for the sake of making some potion, why not be willing to jog for half an hour for the sake of making the burn bar higher than the consume bar?

stuck
10-21-2015, 07:10 PM
Any data I could possibly collect would be worthless. And even if you could have an accurate count of number of calories you've consumed, I don't think it would mean all that much.

The science and data just isn't on your side here.

Personally, I did a hard three month diet once, and lost a significant amount of weight. I then calculated the actual pounds lost vs. the daily caloric restriction, and it was absolutely accurate. I'm not talking small amounts either. I was on about a 2,000 calorie deficit for much of the time.

scarydoor
10-21-2015, 07:29 PM
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/science-reveals-why-calorie-counts-are-all-wrong/

stuck
10-21-2015, 07:43 PM
Well fine, there's individual variation, gut flora, and bioavailability, etc. However, if you take the individual variation out of it, calories in/out will still be accurate. The reason being is that, even if that sweet potato that's 100 calories for me is 200 calories for you, you will still modulate weight by adjusting your calories, with that information taken into account.

I've never seen any reputable source deny that calories in/out is the #1 factor in changing weight. Yes, there are other factors that are important, but none as important as that.

Perdix
10-21-2015, 07:50 PM
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/science-reveals-why-calorie-counts-are-all-wrong/


Twinkie diet helps nutrition professor lose 27 pounds (http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/11/08/twinkie.diet.professor/)

Sistamatic
10-22-2015, 01:48 AM
The science and data just isn't on your side here.

Personally, I did a hard three month diet once, and lost a significant amount of weight. I then calculated the actual pounds lost vs. the daily caloric restriction, and it was absolutely accurate. I'm not talking small amounts either. I was on about a 2,000 calorie deficit for much of the time.

Agreed. I've just lost another pound for a total of 5 in 8 days. I've done it by making sure my fitbit charge HR estimation of calories burned has exceeded the fitbit app's estimation of the number of calories in the food I'm eating by between 500 and 800 calories per day. In that time I've eaten chocolate cake, ice cream, McDonalds, a big sushi feast, all sorts of things. I'm making an effort most of the time to eat "good" foods, but I'm not being terribly strict about it either. It's the number that's my bottom line. I'm looking right now at the chart of the weight I've lost in the last 8 days and it makes me so freakin' happy. I've tried all sorts of things...eating healthy but not counting calories, cutting out sugar but not counting calories, working out really hard but not counting calories, cutting out beer but not counting calories, etc., but every single time I've ever managed to lose a bunch of weight fast, it's been by counting calories in vs. out.
scarydoor -- a Calorie you see on a food label...it is a very specifically defined thing. It is one kilocalorie, and is defined as the amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of water 1 C. Period. It is very possible to estimate your intake as the number of Calories is on all food packaging with a 20% allowable fudge factor, and an estimation of the amount in all kinds of fresh produce by weight is readily available online. The calories on the label are only digestible calories. A calorie that cannot be burned by your body...a non-digestible calorie such as those in fiber...they are not included in the calorie count on the label.

Estimating calories burned is trickier as individual metabolisms do vary in efficiency, but if you have a faster or slower than average metabolism, or if your metabolism should change as a result of diet and exercise, all you have to do make your calorie counting diet work is simply adjust your deficit up or down until you see the desired result...as stuck said. HR monitoring counters are more accurate than mere step counters for obvious reasons.

stuck
10-22-2015, 06:23 AM
Do a simple diagnostic test and tell me how many proper form wide arm military pushups you can do in ten minutes, PROPER FORM.

121, barf

it was smooth sailing, 20 each minute, until #81.

pensive_pilgrim
10-22-2015, 06:45 AM
I've been trying to eat a lot but it's hard. Even when I'm hungry I never want to eat anything. I don't bother counting calories, I just try to force myself to stay full. I wish I could just wear an automated pump to inject the right things into my blood. and then have my whole digestive tract surgically removed so I never have to shit either

Perdix
10-22-2015, 06:55 AM
121, barf

it was smooth sailing, 20 each minute, until #81.

I'm impressed. Especially since you got through 100. At this point, if you want to throw pushups into your routine I would recommend going decline by however much you can handle.


I've been trying to eat a lot but it's hard. Even when I'm hungry I never want to eat anything.

I've heard they've medications for that ;).

stuck
10-22-2015, 07:00 PM
I'm impressed. Especially since you got through 100. At this point, if you want to throw pushups into your routine I would recommend going decline by however much you can handle.

I like em, it seems like they're almost HIIT and the recovery time isn't insane on them- I feel fine this morning.

Sistamatic
10-22-2015, 07:16 PM
I've been trying to eat a lot but it's hard. Even when I'm hungry I never want to eat anything. I don't bother counting calories, I just try to force myself to stay full. I wish I could just wear an automated pump to inject the right things into my blood. and then have my whole digestive tract surgically removed so I never have to shit either

I've known people like this...just not that into eating. My m-i-l counts calories so that she doesn't starve to death...she just hates eating.

I'm on the opposite end of the spectrum. I've got a great metabolism ... but it is outstripped utterly by my desire for food. I love to eat. I don't just want a slice of pizza...I want a pizza. I don't want a slice of pie. I want some pies.

Madrigal
10-23-2015, 12:11 AM
I used to be the same way about food, when I was a vegetarian. I started appreciating food after 25. It started as a past-time - eating out - and then I became interested. I'm starting to care about cooking too. High time.

Limes
10-23-2015, 04:16 AM
I ate very little today. Had to see the dentist. I think it's a courtesy to not go after eating, plus it's the dentist, so who has an appetite for that.
$4000 in quotes, it's worse than taking a Mercedes to the dealer.

jyng1
10-23-2015, 06:48 AM
$4000 in quotes, it's worse than taking a Mercedes to the dealer.

Hmmm... sounds like a holiday to Phuket (http://www.phuketdentalclinic.com/#&panel1-1&panel2-1) is in order.

stuck
10-23-2015, 06:52 AM
$4000 in quotes,

oof, was it the sugar?

Limes
10-23-2015, 08:24 AM
oof, was it the sugar?

Almost certainly that and not flossing enough.

"you aren't flossing enough"
-said no dentist, ever.