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View Full Version : Bodies of weight-lifters vs marathon runners vs sprinters



JohnClay
02-05-2016, 12:14 PM
Elite weight-lifters: (though not all are fat, it is common)
http://www.sportslook.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/SD-HosseinRezazadeh-1.jpg http://www.sportslook.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/SD-VasilyAlekseyev-1.jpg

The strongest man in history:
http://www.thehumanmarvels.com/uploaded_images/cyr6ic-756968.jpg
http://www.thehumanmarvels.com/louis-cyr-the-strongest-man-in-history/

Elite marathon runners: (skinny)
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/04/29/article-0-1D71F3C800000578-546_634x499.jpg http://cdn.running.competitor.com/files/2015/05/Hall-slices-boston-800x553.jpg

Elite sprinters: (muscular with low body fat percentage)
http://test.trackmom.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/lauryn-williams-2008-track-us-olympic-team-trials-day-7-0ybapk.jpg http://dynamicduotraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/sprinteer.png http://celebrityinside.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Usain-Bolt-Body-Measurements1.png

Though sprinters often do weight-training there are also the ancient Greek athletes - they were also muscular with low body fat and perhaps didn't do much weight training.

BTW I started to walk recently and now I'm doing short sprints a few times each walk. I enjoy it much more than weight training or intense cardio.

Also:
http://blog.thegymlifestyle.com/sprinting-to-reduce-body-fat/
"It’s [sprinting] one of the few fat burning activities that can actually build muscle tissue instead of catabolizing it"

ferrus
02-05-2016, 12:17 PM
I'm guessing you look like a sprinter.

JohnClay
02-05-2016, 12:23 PM
I'm guessing you look like a sprinter.
No I think only people that do something like weights or sprinting would look like a muscular sprinter. I am pretty skinny with a fairly large belly and man boobs.

Sappho
02-05-2016, 12:35 PM
Elite sprinters: (muscular with low body fat percentage)
http://test.trackmom.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/lauryn-williams-2008-track-us-olympic-team-trials-day-7-0ybapk.jpg http://dynamicduotraining.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/sprinteer.png

Wouldn't want to cross any of the two in a dark alley. :ph34r:

NedLudd
02-05-2016, 12:59 PM
Did you have a point to make or did you just think this is interesting?

SheepDog
02-05-2016, 02:11 PM
I know the point.

People are drawn to activities that match their body type. Skinny people do well in sprinting (and related sports), so therefore they choose those sports. People who tend to acquire muscle mass choose sports where that is an advantage. And since we have a selection bias of seeing the success of people where the match is the best (i.e. ones with a poor match get weeded out), we can confirm our underlying belief that body type determines choice of athletic activities.

FTW! HOOORAAAH!

JohnClay
02-05-2016, 11:55 PM
Did you have a point to make or did you just think this is interesting?
It is about 3 types of exercise - weight-lifting, jogging and sprinting and the type of body you can get just relying on that type of exercise. It seems like weightlifting can put on muscle and not lose fat, jogging makes you lose fat and muscle, while sprinting makes you lose fat and gain some muscle. ("Itís [sprinting] one of the few fat burning activities that can actually build muscle tissue instead of catabolizing it")
I also mentioned that lately I've started sprinting and not bothered with jogging or weight-lifting.

JohnClay
02-05-2016, 11:58 PM
I know the point.

People are drawn to activities that match their body type. Skinny people do well in sprinting (and related sports), so therefore they choose those sports.
No joggers (marathon runners) are the skinny ones!

Here are some more sprinters:
https://4pack.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/sprinterslegs.jpg
(note: like I said elite weight-lifters often have a lot of fat - body-builders are different)
http://beastmotivation.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/bodybuilder-vs-sprinter.jpg
http://blog.thegymlifestyle.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/crank-it-5.jpg
Sprinter vs marathon runner:
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/45/6f/f8/456ff8ee5f7fe8370f2f91822dbe0553.jpg

I wouldn't call those sprinter pics "skinny".

Sistamatic
02-06-2016, 12:11 AM
No joggers (marathon runners) are the skinny ones!

Here are some more sprinters:


I wouldn't call those sprinter pics "skinny".

This guy argues that at the intensity most non-elites are working out at, it doesn't really matter.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrDqWbBMA9o

JohnClay
02-06-2016, 12:13 AM
This guy argues that at the intensity most non-elites are working out at, it doesn't really matter.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrDqWbBMA9o
Yes I said "Though sprinters often do weight-training there are also the ancient Greek athletes - they were also muscular with low body fat and perhaps didn't do much weight training."

It seems his point was mainly about normal people vs elite sprinters and marathon runners... that doesn't change what I quoted: "It’s [sprinting] one of the few fat burning activities that can actually build muscle tissue instead of catabolizing it".

In this part he says marathon runners are "torching through glycogen, fat, muscle..."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrDqWbBMA9o&feature=youtu.be&t=5m27s

So that's one reason why I don't want to do much jogging (any muscle loss at all would be bad)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrDqWbBMA9o&feature=youtu.be&t=5m45s
"The more reasonable comparison is the person doing an hour's worth of exercise and an averagely slow person doing sprints".

Well that's good enough for me. BTW walking and sprinting can also be called "interval training".

stigmatica
02-06-2016, 12:58 AM
A lot of the "elite" body build arguments are a logical fallacy that assume that because most top performers in an activity have a particular body type, the activity creates that body type. While I believe that there's is a relationship in that direction, I believe there's a much larger relationship the other direction. A particular body type is a top performer in an activity because they're born with that particular body type. Pretty much what SheepDog was trying to say, minus the Skinny mistype. Take a champion sprinter, somehow reverse time and switch them to a career in marathoning at a young age instead, they'll still have the same base body type and fail miserably as a marathoner... and of course, visa versa. Sistamatic can probably go into more details on the genetics, but people are born with different genetic propensities for developing fast twitch and slow twitch muscles. You can change the balance through training, as you suggest, but not so dramatically as you would see comparing the top end performers of two apposing activities.

For most of us normal non competing athletes, I'd think the goal is to maintain a healthy balance. Also, jogging and marathoning are far different activities. A 5 mile run, assuming you're eating right, is NOT going to eat your muscles away. That said, if you want to become a top performing 5 mile runner, you better be willing to lose some muscle weight through dieting, which WILL catabolize some muscle away. You're going to need to slim down to the exact right muscle ratio to maximize the energy expenditure savings without giving up needed muscle to perform that 5 mile. You need to make yourself into a 5 mile tuned machine. If, on the other hand, you just want to be in good shape, you can keep whatever muscle you want and run 5 miles all the time. It's not going to eat your muscles up as long as you eat for it.

That said, if you're running marathon distances constantly, yeah. Going to be near impossible to maintain a significant amount of muscle mass. It's pretty difficult if not impossible to have that kind of food energy on hand at those distances.

I workout a lot. When I want to gain strength and muscle, I eat more. When I want to lose fat, I eat less. My workouts do not change. If I'm losing fat, I'm either maintaining muscle/strength or slightly losing. If I'm wanting to gain strength and muscle, I'm eating more.. and gaining it.. along with a bit of fat. My 3 to 6 mile runs several times a week play no part in it. As for sprinting, if you want good strong bones it's good to do some once every week or two.

In a nutshell, it's all about finding the balance you need for you. Figuring out how your body responds, what it can and can't take.. and really, your diet. Sprints, jogging? They're just a drop in the pond for how your body develops compared to what it is you're shoving in your pie hole. And unless you're trying to be a pro at a particular thing, the choice between the two (sprint vs jog) really isn't that important.

Edit: As for strength training (weight lifting, etc...) - Definitely a good companion with either jogging or sprinting. Keeps your bones strong, keeps your muscles in good condition, etc... but again. Why do power lifters tend to look a bit chunky? Because they're working on making a lifting machine. They're going to make more strength gains not worrying about fat gains, so they tend to be chunky. Bodybuilders ride the line between the two, and of course in most cases supplement with interesting cocktails to achieve it.

I could easily go up 50 pounds on bench press in the next month or two. All I need do is eat enough to gain 30 pounds while maintaining my workout discipline. About 10 pounds of muscle, and 20 pounds of fat. Bam! I prefer to just stay skinny though.

Sistamatic
02-06-2016, 02:27 AM
A lot of the "elite" body build arguments are a logical fallacy that assume that because most top performers in an activity have a particular body type, the activity creates that body type. While I believe that there's is a relationship in that direction, I believe there's a much larger relationship the other direction. A particular body type is a top performer in an activity because they're born with that particular body type. Pretty much what SheepDog was trying to say, minus the Skinny mistype. Take a champion sprinter, somehow reverse time and switch them to a career in marathoning at a young age instead, they'll still have the same base body type and fail miserably as a marathoner... and of course, visa versa. Sistamatic can probably go into more details on the genetics, but people are born with different genetic propensities for developing fast twitch and slow twitch muscles. You can change the balance through training, as you suggest, but not so dramatically as you would see comparing the top end performers of two apposing activities.

For most of us normal non competing athletes, I'd think the goal is to maintain a healthy balance. Also, jogging and marathoning are far different activities. A 5 mile run, assuming you're eating right, is NOT going to eat your muscles away. That said, if you want to become a top performing 5 mile runner, you better be willing to lose some muscle weight through dieting, which WILL catabolize some muscle away. You're going to need to slim down to the exact right muscle ratio to maximize the energy expenditure savings without giving up needed muscle to perform that 5 mile. You need to make yourself into a 5 mile tuned machine. If, on the other hand, you just want to be in good shape, you can keep whatever muscle you want and run 5 miles all the time. It's not going to eat your muscles up as long as you eat for it.

That said, if you're running marathon distances constantly, yeah. Going to be near impossible to maintain a significant amount of muscle mass. It's pretty difficult if not impossible to have that kind of food energy on hand at those distances.

I workout a lot. When I want to gain strength and muscle, I eat more. When I want to lose fat, I eat less. My workouts do not change. If I'm losing fat, I'm either maintaining muscle/strength or slightly losing. If I'm wanting to gain strength and muscle, I'm eating more.. and gaining it.. along with a bit of fat. My 3 to 6 mile runs several times a week play no part in it. As for sprinting, if you want good strong bones it's good to do some once every week or two.

In a nutshell, it's all about finding the balance you need for you. Figuring out how your body responds, what it can and can't take.. and really, your diet. Sprints, jogging? They're just a drop in the pond for how your body develops compared to what it is you're shoving in your pie hole. And unless you're trying to be a pro at a particular thing, the choice between the two (sprint vs jog) really isn't that important.

Edit: As for strength training (weight lifting, etc...) - Definitely a good companion with either jogging or sprinting. Keeps your bones strong, keeps your muscles in good condition, etc... but again. Why do power lifters tend to look a bit chunky? Because they're working on making a lifting machine. They're going to make more strength gains not worrying about fat gains, so they tend to be chunky. Bodybuilders ride the line between the two, and of course in most cases supplement with interesting cocktails to achieve it.

I could easily go up 50 pounds on bench press in the next month or two. All I need do is eat enough to gain 30 pounds while maintaining my workout discipline. About 10 pounds of muscle, and 20 pounds of fat. Bam! I prefer to just stay skinny though.

Clearly what we need to do is raise thousands of identical twins and force one of each pair into sprinting and the other into marathoning. I was at my best at 5k in high school, but 23 and me says I'm a sprinter.

pensive_pilgrim
02-06-2016, 02:35 AM
People are pretty adaptable, I think elite sprinters could be great marathoners (but probably not elite) with enough training.

JohnClay
02-06-2016, 03:52 AM
People are pretty adaptable, I think elite sprinters could be great marathoners (but probably not elite) with enough training.
Video goes under 2 mins:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jws3Q4np34Q
It says it is partly about how the athletes train their muscles.... i.e. the sprinters could become pretty good marathoners. I mean it is about 20%:80% muscle ratio... the sprinters could just allow their fast twitch muscles to waste away and train for hours at a time for endurance (slow twitch).
On the other hand I think I won't do much jogging so that I have a lesser slow twitch muscle ratio.

JohnClay
02-06-2016, 04:10 AM
A lot of the "elite" body build arguments are a logical fallacy that assume that because most top performers in an activity have a particular body type, the activity creates that body type.
Good point it was just a theory I came up with.


While I believe that there's is a relationship in that direction, I believe there's a much larger relationship the other direction. A particular body type is a top performer in an activity because they're born with that particular body type.
I've always been bad at sprinting against my peers but I just want to try it. I'm not expecting to ever become elite and perhaps never become above average.


I workout a lot. When I want to gain strength and muscle, I eat more. When I want to lose fat, I eat less. My workouts do not change. If I'm losing fat, I'm either maintaining muscle/strength or slightly losing. If I'm wanting to gain strength and muscle, I'm eating more.. and gaining it.. along with a bit of fat.
You said you might be slightly losing muscle when losing fat or gaining fat when you're trying to gain muscle. But I want to lose fat and not lose muscle. I don't want to work out (besides walking and sprinting for the time being)


....As for sprinting, if you want good strong bones it's good to do some once every week or two.
Another benefit - strong bones? Good.


....I could easily go up 50 pounds on bench press in the next month or two. All I need do is eat enough to gain 30 pounds while maintaining my workout discipline. About 10 pounds of muscle, and 20 pounds of fat. Bam!
I wonder how the strongest man in history did it though? Well his whole family was strong so I guess it was in his genes.
http://www.thehumanmarvels.com/louis-cyr-the-strongest-man-in-history/
I mean body builders would have more total muscle on them though so I thought having more muscle means being stronger.


I prefer to just stay skinny though.
Yep that is my goal. To be skinny where my belly is. I want to maintain or slightly increase my muscle but a flat stomatch (unlike Louis Cyr) is my primary goal.

pensive_pilgrim
02-06-2016, 04:25 AM
Here you go JC. I think you should take up water polo or the high jump.
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-1.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-2.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-3.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-4.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-5.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-6.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-7.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-8.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-9.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-10.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-11.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-12.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-13.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-14.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-15.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-16.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-17.jpg
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-18.jpg

JohnClay
02-06-2016, 04:28 AM
BTW
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrPvZWVtuuc&feature=youtu.be&t=27s
"If you're a sprinter you run 100's, you run 200's - stuff like that. You don't run 400's or 800's because I think you're wearing out those fast twitch fibers and you're working on a whole different system.... the neuromuscular system is now firing at a slower rate as you're teaching it endurance. You're not teaching it explosive dynamics mechanics." "...If you want to be a sprinter don't spend too much time in the distance field"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrPvZWVtuuc&feature=youtu.be&t=2m50s
"Whenever I train somebody.... I get them to do sprint intervals because I think that would be the fastest way to lose weight..."

I like short distance sprinting... it is enjoyable but on the other hand going much longer makes me feel very exhausted.

JohnClay
02-06-2016, 04:58 AM
Here you go JC. I think you should take up water polo or the high jump.
http://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uuuploads/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz/different-body-types-olympic-athletes-howard-schatz-12.jpg
Thanks for the pics. High jump is basically half sprinting but more repetitive and I don't like the pool - it is usually too cold. But sprinting is something I can do along the road or at the beach I live right next to.

Tigerlily
02-06-2016, 05:15 AM
John, are you working towards being a competitive body builder?

Sistamatic
02-06-2016, 06:27 AM
Based on the pictures it looks like sport aerobics gives the same sort of body type as a sprinter, though probably with more flexibility and agility. I had to google it. It appears to be a cross between gymnastics and a dance off, or like cheerleading with one armed pushups thrown in. Competitive calisthenics.

JohnClay
02-06-2016, 08:23 AM
John, are you working towards being a competitive body builder?
Well I don't want a strict diet or do weight-lifting so no.

Sappho
02-06-2016, 11:38 AM
Re Marathon: I wonder when people will realise that the human body is not actually meant to run one.

RIP Pheidippides. Barely two-and-a-half millennia later and you've died for nothing, you poor bugger.

stigmatica
02-06-2016, 03:27 PM
You said you might be slightly losing muscle when losing fat or gaining fat when you're trying to gain muscle. But I want to lose fat and not lose muscle. I don't want to work out (besides walking and sprinting for the time being)

If you haven't been working out much in a while, this is possible (gain muscle and lose fat) for a short while, if you do it just right. But long term, once you've been at it for a while, that will no longer be likely to occur. You'll reach a plateau at some point. Once you hit it, you'll find that food intake suddenly becomes a magical variable. Good sleep too, the variable that gets me more often than any other. But yeah, a sprinting routine combined with a good diet could get you where you want to be if you stick with it long enough. You'll likely gain a bit of muscle due to your beginner status, and lose a bit of fat. If your happy with where you end up plateauing, just stick with it and you're good to go. If not, you have to get a bit more complicated with all your variables.

Senseye
02-06-2016, 10:14 PM
The whole "cardio burns muscle" is such a misleading a statement I would almost call it a myth. An elite athlete with super low body fat (and even then, said athlete would probably having to be trying to cut weight - i.e. not eating much) could probably burn some muscle doing cardio. The average joe almost cetainly won't (unless the average joe is also putting himself on some sort of crazy extreme diet to go along with an "i'm gonna get lean in two weeks" mania).

See here, for example, (and you can google up lots more scientific stuff about the human metabolic process if it suits you).

http://healthyliving.azcentral.com/cardio-burn-muscle-fat-6580.html


If you want to burn fat, engaging in cardio is certainly one way to do so. Cardio almost always burns both carbohydrates -- in the form of glycogen -- and stored fat together, and training in the low to moderately high range results in fat burning. You are only at risk of turning protein, and thus your own muscle tissue, into fuel under extreme circumstances.

Fat cannot be burned without the presence of carbohydrates. Once carbohydrate stores are depleted, the body's only other source of fuel is protein; your body breaks down protein into amino acids to make sugar. Often, your very own muscle tissue is this source of protein. Muscle tissue takes hard work to acquire and helps keep your metabolism high. The more muscle mass you have, the higher your metabolism. Burning muscle tissue for fuel works against your efforts to lower body fat.

Anyway, all this stuff is moot for the average joe. The best exercise for the average joe is one he will actually do. So if sprinting floats your boat John Clay, have at it. There's no need to concoct some kooky rationalization to go along with it.

JohnClay
02-07-2016, 04:25 AM
The whole "cardio burns muscle" is such a misleading a statement I would almost call it a myth...
From a poster called "running coach":
http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showpost.php?p=19077199&postcount=14
"5% of energy burned during aerobic exercise comes from muscle tissue. Depletion of glycogen can raise that as high as 15%."

Hephaestus
02-12-2016, 12:00 AM
Elite adventure cyclists show that elite marathoners are doing it wrong. They probably aren't eating enough as they run.

Sistamatic
02-12-2016, 03:23 AM
Anyway, all this stuff is moot for the average joe. The best exercise for the average joe is one he will actually do.

Yes. When I see the picture comparing the elite sprinter to the elite marathoner, I know that I'm never going to dedicate myself to a routine that will bring me anywhere near either body type ever again. I was a semi-elite 5k runner at one point in my life, and my ass was still huge and my shoulders and arms quite muscular...but not in a bodybuilder way. I'm a bit too broken down to be an elite anything now. I've been a firefighter, I've been hit by a car, I've got disc issues in my lower back, I have no feeling in the right L4 dermatome, on and off bursitis that flares to the point of nearly crippling me sometimes, bad feet, the "shitty ankle" of Louis C.K. fame, and my knees sound like a box of rocks when I kneel. I'm just happy when I can work out period.
The only thing I'll ever be elite at is the game show "Who's More Grizzled."

I_AM
02-12-2016, 03:54 AM
Elite adventure cyclists show that elite marathoners are doing it wrong. They probably aren't eating enough as they run.
Elite level wrestlers demonstrate that cyclists and marathoners fitness levels work best for fleeing. Adventure cyclists is a thing now? You learn something new every day I guess.

Hephaestus
02-12-2016, 05:30 AM
Elite level wrestlers demonstrate that cyclists and marathoners fitness levels work best for fleeing.
Kiting ftw.

I_AM
02-12-2016, 05:54 AM
Kiting ftw.
https://talesfromtheundergardnerslodge.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/keyboard-jockey-south-park.jpg
Kiting ftr

Hephaestus
02-12-2016, 06:29 AM
https://talesfromtheundergardnerslodge.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/keyboard-jockey-south-park.jpg
Kiting ftr

Kiting is an ancient tactic. Granted the ancients called it something else.

JohnClay
02-12-2016, 06:35 AM
Elite adventure cyclists show that elite marathoners are doing it wrong. They probably aren't eating enough as they run.
Proper marathons are 26 miles. Every pound would make it harder. So that's why the winners would tend to have less excess weight. But bikes support the weight of the rider so weight isn't as much of an issue.

mthomps
03-24-2016, 02:05 PM
I never consented to that alternate pic during the photo shoot of my avatar, btw. I_AM

Make yourself better at doing something physical, John.

Hephaestus
03-24-2016, 05:28 PM
Proper marathons are 26 miles. Every pound would make it harder. So that's why the winners would tend to have less excess weight. But bikes support the weight of the rider so weight isn't as much of an issue.

Mass is mass. Tell the weight weenies that weight isn't an issue. It is. The heavier the load on the bike, the harder it is to move. No matter what, you have that mass to move, and cyclists move more mass than runners--they move the mass of the bike as well as their own. In the case of adventure cyclists, they move even more mass than typical cyclists because they pack on a bunch of camping gear, then, to make sure the frame can take the stress, they favor steel frame bikes over aluminium. Every pound makes it harder for cyclists too--and they travel much much further.

stuck
03-24-2016, 05:40 PM
We need a new modern pentathlon:

shitposting
weed buying
netflixing
chilling
weed smoking

Sistamatic
03-24-2016, 08:44 PM
^lol
What do you think the age range and body type of the elites would be? Would we need to have different competition categories for men and women?

In regards to the thread title...right now I'd settle for the body of someone who had kept up with her exercise regimen for more than a week at a time in the last year. Sigh.

stuck
03-24-2016, 09:01 PM
^lol
What do you think the age range and body type of the elites would be? Would we need to have different competition categories for men and women?


shitposting and chilling are potentially two quite different skillsets, so it's hard to say. i think there would be a lot of experimentation with the percentage of sativa in the hybrid of weed preferred. i also think californians would have a natural advantage in weed buying.

The age range would be 18 (for legal reasons) to probably about 19, because after that people would forget to enter the competition, or move on to professional internet personality careers.

Sistamatic
03-24-2016, 09:09 PM
shitposting and chilling are potentially two quite different skillsets, so it's hard to say. i think there would be a lot of experimentation with the percentage of sativa in the hybrid of weed preferred. i also think californians would have a natural advantage in weed buying.

Jamaica and Amsterdam spring to mind as advantaged in the weed buying event.

But not necessarily. If the event was held in an area where buying was illegal, the spoiled Californians and Amsterdammers might not even know where to start. If several competitors had the same connections, it could get interesting.

The order of events would come into play as well. Some people would want to do the shitpost event prior to smoking weed, but some personalities have weed-enhanced shitposting skills. The elites would be those who could do all five events simultaneously without even getting out of bed.

Hephaestus
03-24-2016, 10:03 PM
Jamaica and Amsterdam spring to mind as advantaged in the weed buying event.

But not necessarily. If the event was held in an area where buying was illegal, the spoiled Californians and Amsterdammers might not even know where to start. If several competitors had the same connections, it could get interesting.

The order of events would come into play as well. Some people would want to do the shitpost event prior to smoking weed, but some personalities have weed-enhanced shitposting skills. The elites would be those who could do all five events simultaneously without even getting out of bed.

Add an ambien or two to the mix and permit use of edibles and I could probably do it without waking up.

scarydoor
03-25-2016, 01:29 PM
Mass is mass. Tell the weight weenies that weight isn't an issue. It is. The heavier the load on the bike, the harder it is to move. No matter what, you have that mass to move, and cyclists move more mass than runners--they move the mass of the bike as well as their own. In the case of adventure cyclists, they move even more mass than typical cyclists because they pack on a bunch of camping gear, then, to make sure the frame can take the stress, they favor steel frame bikes over aluminium. Every pound makes it harder for cyclists too--and they travel much much further.
I think johnclay is referring to the impact upon the body with each step or rotation of pedal.

With each step, runners absorb more than their full body weight through their legs/ankles/etc. Cyclists have the majority of their body weight supported by the bike seat and so the impact with each pedal stroke is mainly just the power needed to go forward. So in that sense body weight is less an issue for cyclists as it is for runners.

Still, weight is an issue at a competitive level. But it seems cyclists have some more variability. For example you can be a pro road cyclist and be a bit heavier (relatively) if you're the type who sits in the group for the whole race and then ends with a sprint finish. It seems that marathon runners couldn't be built like that because the tactics don't work the same way. I would imagine that professional mountain bike riders might have slightly more muscle mass since I imagine they have times when they have to put out a lot of power to get over a random very step lump of ground. It seems more physical in general. Upper body strength too. In contrast road cycling is quite gentle.

stuck
03-25-2016, 05:49 PM
bikes are much more efficient than legs

I'm saying it, aprez moi le shitstorm

Hephaestus
03-26-2016, 02:42 AM
I think johnclay is referring to the impact upon the body with each step or rotation of pedal.

With each step, runners absorb more than their full body weight through their legs/ankles/etc. Cyclists have the majority of their body weight supported by the bike seat and so the impact with each pedal stroke is mainly just the power needed to go forward. So in that sense body weight is less an issue for cyclists as it is for runners.

Still, weight is an issue at a competitive level. But it seems cyclists have some more variability. For example you can be a pro road cyclist and be a bit heavier (relatively) if you're the type who sits in the group for the whole race and then ends with a sprint finish. It seems that marathon runners couldn't be built like that because the tactics don't work the same way. I would imagine that professional mountain bike riders might have slightly more muscle mass since I imagine they have times when they have to put out a lot of power to get over a random very step lump of ground. It seems more physical in general. Upper body strength too. In contrast road cycling is quite gentle.

Whether or not the bike seat is supporting their weight depends a lot on what they are doing. Obviously it isn't when they're sprinting--though this also depends on frame geometry. I ride a long wheelbase recumbent so I actually am sitting on my ass the entire ride--there's no way to stand up. But a cyclist on a standard upright diamond frame frequently rises onto their feet and their weight is taken on their posterior chain and their wrists--even when riding seated an upright cyclists puts undue pressure on their wrists.

Furthermore, just because they're in the saddle doesn't mean every pound doesn't count. The heavier you are, the faster you get numbness in your genitals, toes and fingers. This is from nerve damage from the weight of the cyclist compressing nerves at every point of contact with the bike. Over time, the damage can be permanent, but can be mitigated with proper rest and decent kit--and shedding weight.

However, it is true that proper cycling technique is easier on the joints than running--by far. Which is part of why cyclists can put so many more miles in than runners. Some would argue mechanical advantage was the reason, but the average distance cyclist burns far more calories than the average marathoner. Comparing say, the Tour de France to... pretty much any marathon, a 125lb marathoner (average weight of the modern top 100 male marathoner in 2011) will burn about 2236 calories. A Tour de France rider will burn more like 8000 per day. So uh... I'm not buying mere mechanical advantage--but not beating yourself to shit (as much), I can go along with.

Shit, my typical ride burns as many calories as an elite marathoner does in their entire marathon... And I'm only going a third further (typically)--though in about the same time frame... but probably more often.

You're comment is actually tangential to the probable reason marathoners don't ingest food as they go the way racing cyclists do--the impact with the ground can jostle their innards to the point they shit their pants. Cyclists just puke or lose interest in cycling until they get accustomed to riding with food in their belly.

You are also correct that cyclists body type varies with their role. Sprinters can be heavier, as can all rounders, but the best climbers are marathoner weight--with tree trunks for legs.

Lurker
03-26-2016, 03:16 AM
I think those bodies are disgusting; the extreme musculature bothers me as much as looking at an anorexic, or even someone sliding that way, with a BMI of 18...these people are disturbingly obsessed with their bodies. I cringe a little when I try to imagine their daily rituals and obsessions. What do they think about day-to-day in order to achieve these extremes? I imagine a broken record. Their inner worlds must shrink and shrink. Suffocating.

Mainly, I think "mentally unwell."

I_AM
04-15-2016, 06:47 PM
I never consented to that alternate pic during the photo shoot of my avatar, btw. I_AM

Make yourself better at doing something physical, John.

Oh, sorry. I'm not sorry. I will be sure to tag you if I ever use that pic again so you won't feel so cheated next time.

Antifragilista
04-15-2016, 06:59 PM
elite sprinters can't be elite lifters and elite lifters can't be elite marathon runners etc. My point is that at the elite level you are looking at athletes that have the correct body type and genetics to excel in their chosen event/sport. Athletes that mismatch their body type and event type don't become elite.

I_AM
04-15-2016, 07:23 PM
elite sprinters can't be elite lifters and elite lifters can't be elite marathon runners etc. My point is that at the elite level you are looking at athletes that have the correct body type and genetics to excel in their chosen event/sport. Athletes that mismatch their body type and event type don't become elite.

Yes, and no. Usain Bolt is the most elite sprinter to ever run the 100m or 200m. His body type is completely unique in sprinting in that he is 6'5"(most other sprinters avg between 5'10"-6'2"). The reason sprinters generally do not get that tall is because height and coordination above 6'2" tend to become inversely proportional with ability to keep the quick burst sprinting form. He certainly has the correct genetics in that he is the best ever. He has proven specifically his body type is superior to anyone of the the old standards because it produces. Keep in mind he is an absolutely unique example. Correct body type is the body that houses the elite athlete that performs at an elite level of whatever sport.

Antifragilista
04-16-2016, 02:48 PM
Yes, and no. Usain Bolt is the most elite sprinter to ever run the 100m or 200m. His body type is completely unique in sprinting in that he is 6'5"(most other sprinters avg between 5'10"-6'2"). The reason sprinters generally do not get that tall is because height and coordination above 6'2" tend to become inversely proportional with ability to keep the quick burst sprinting form. He certainly has the correct genetics in that he is the best ever. He has proven specifically his body type is superior to anyone of the the old standards because it produces. Keep in mind he is an absolutely unique example. Correct body type is the body that houses the elite athlete that performs at an elite level of whatever sport.

usain proves there's some unknown margin of error when it comes to measurements of elite athletes. that said, he never could become an elite lifter or marathon runner imho. there are some sports that have transferable skills and abilities but Bolt will have to stick to sprinting to perform at an elite level. maybe bolt could be a decent marathon runner but never elite.

mthomps
06-03-2016, 03:14 PM
everyone here sucks at working out. lol