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Horatio
10-12-2017, 06:52 PM
Share your recipes. Snacks, lunches, dinner, whatever. No expensive ingredients, if possible, and nothing that takes longer than 20 minutes to prepare (that's the challenge). Maximum efficiency on all three fronts – health, cost, speed – is the goal. Results should taste edible.


Tuna Cucumber Salad
(150 kcal, 30g of protein)

Chop 150g cucumber, 1/2 small red onion, mix with 100g canned tuna (brine, drained), season with pepper and a dash of soy sauce. Done. Need some carbs? The salad also tastes nice on crisp bread.


Soba noodles with chicken and broccoli
(388 kcal, 42g of protein)

Cook 140g of frozen broccoli in salted water. Pan-fry 140g of chicken (any cut), set aside. Remove broccoli from boiling water with slotted spoon, cook soba noodles in same water. Drain, mix with drained broccoli and diced roast chicken. Season with pan juices, salt and pepper. Done.


Red currant oatmeal chocolate chip muffins (to be used as dessert, a quick breakfast or mid-morning snack)
(160 kcal, 5g of protein each - recipe makes 12 muffins)

Preheat oven to 180°. Throw three ripe bananas, one egg, 60g honey, 180g non-fat Greek yoghurt, 25g coconut oil, a teaspoon of vanilla extract and a pinch of salt into a blender; blend. Mix 180g whole-wheat flour with half a table spoon of baking powder, sift into wet mixture, carefully mix. Gently fold in 80g red currents (or cranberries) and 50g chocolate chips. Fill into a 12-piece muffin pan, bake for 20-25 minutes. Done.


I've got more like these and might illustrate this thread with pictures if general interest exists. Let's see.

pensive_pilgrim
10-12-2017, 07:40 PM
Add 1/3 cup whole oat flour and 2 cups water to a blender bottle. Shake. Drink. Repeat as necessary. This is the most efficient method I've found.

Horatio
10-12-2017, 07:45 PM
Add 1/3 cup whole oat flour and 2 cups water to a blender bottle. Shake. Drink. Repeat as necessary. This is the most efficient method I've found.

If you make that water milk or almond milk, perhaps reduce the amount a bit, and let it sit over night, you'll wake up to a decent instant breakfast you'll only need to top with berries, chocolate chips, peanut butter or honey (or all).

Faust
10-12-2017, 09:50 PM
If you make that water milk or almond milk, perhaps reduce the amount a bit, and let it sit over night, you'll wake up to a decent instant breakfast you'll only need to top with berries, chocolate chips, peanut butter or honey (or all).

Basically what I do with rolled oats. Cheap and delicious.


Reminder that squash is now in season in NA and in addition to being pretty damn cheap they can yield portions for the whole week. I had baked butternut squash recently.

-stab with a fork all over
-microwave 2 minutes
-now that it's a bit tender, chop up into pieces and scoop out the seeds (also peel if you care to, but it isn't necessary)
-toss in olive oil, pepper and chili spice (or cinnamon)
-throw in oven at 425F for 40 minutes, maybe turn them over once to prevent burning

Not something that gets done in an instant I guess but convenient nonetheless.

Recent discovery that might also be helpful: red wine vinegar as a substitute for lime juice. It's cheap and works well in a pinch to add acidity. Also, olive oil + rwv is the ultimate regular-use salad dressing base.

lethe
10-12-2017, 09:54 PM
Yay! This is kind of the heart of my goal with my career. Combating the illusion that healthy eating is a hobby or luxury item.

Those who suffer the most are the lower SE classes. Lack of time, knowledge, and skill combined with the public perception that "better food" is "fancy, exotic, expensive" and often foreign pushes them to take quick, easy, and cheap which is often unhealthy convenience.


In reality, some of the best staples are the cheapest. Bags of brown rice, dry beans for example. Make them in bulk in a crock pot, learn freezing techniques and have them in serving sizes you can quickly grab, mix with a meat, a vegetable, anything.

Buy in season (it's cheapest, tastiest and most nutritious) and freeze what you can't use immediately. When cutting one onion/prepping a dish ingredient, cut all you will need for the week.

Every meal you make make some extra to have a single frozen dinner for later. Microwave reheating skills are worth learning. Learn to compare prices by weight at grocery store.

So many skills and strategies can be used to make familiar, cheap and healthy food that you can have on hand as fast as you can buy a cheeseburger, even in ways children can heat.

Faust
10-12-2017, 09:59 PM
Yay! This is kind of the heart of my goal with my career. Combating the illusion that healthy eating is a hobby or luxury item.


I've thought about this problem a lot. In what form would such an initiative be most effective? I think some face-time is a necessary part of it.

pensive_pilgrim
10-12-2017, 10:19 PM
If you make that water milk or almond milk, perhaps reduce the amount a bit, and let it sit over night, you'll wake up to a decent instant breakfast you'll only need to top with berries, chocolate chips, peanut butter or honey (or all).

Then I'd have to sit there and shovel it into my mouth with a spoon or something, instead of just drinking it down. No thanks. Peasants like me have been living on gruel for millennia, no need for all that fancy stuff.

lethe
10-12-2017, 10:26 PM
I've thought about this problem a lot. In what form would such an initiative be most effective? I think some face-time is a necessary part of it.

Yes. My big idea they already starting test running. What I'd like to do is have monthly classes/presentations for local families who receive SNAP benefits and give them an extra credit for attending. In which we feed the kids, discuss shopping strategies, basic freezing and bulk cooking skills, general nutrition knowledge of course, resources to fund the cheapest most nutritious crash food in that area and season, and simple recipes to throw together with minimal time and skill, ideally ones that are safe and easy enough for children to contribute.

Plus we could pass out sponsered kitchen supplies like microwave vegetable steamers and spatulas or freezer bags

flurps
10-12-2017, 10:35 PM
Wrap vitamin pills in little wads of flour and milk. I call them energy balls

Fitz
10-12-2017, 11:12 PM
These are always the most depressing threads on the forum.


I miss the glory days at the old place with rincon Delilah and the food threads there.

Faust
10-12-2017, 11:20 PM
Someone can always take the vacancy for Gratuitous, Delicious Eating and Fuck Your Budget

MuseedesBeauxArts
10-12-2017, 11:29 PM
I like simple vegetable soups:
https://smittenkitchen.com/2006/09/silky-cauliflower-soup/ I've probably posted this before, but it's beyond simple. You can do with broccoli or zucchini or cauliflower, add some bread and cheese, and you're done. It also freezes well as it's a purée.
There's also a red lentil soup with lemon from the NYTimes that I like a lot, same basic idea as above.

To lethe's point, garbanzo beans freeze really well and are useful in pasta, Buddha bowls, hummus, all sorts of goodness! Lately, my freezer has had garbanzos, edamame beans for snacking, broiled eggplant, fresh pasta like tortellini, a baguette. These are the start of some excellent quick dishes.

PureViolence
10-12-2017, 11:41 PM
Buy bottles of garbanzos already made.
Poor some cut bacon, onion and garlic. Fry for a couple of minutes and you'll be happy. Peas work just as fine.

Cook some rice. Fry some mix veggies with olive oil and then poor them to the rice.

Pork pate, mix it with cottage cheese, poor some pepper, mayo, cumin and some salt. Spread it on some crackers or bread, I personally don't enjoy sandwich, unless it is toasted on a pan.

Cook pasta. Cut some salmon. Fry green chilli (a little bit) and a bit of garlic, add pepper, olive oil and mix and with a bit of salt.

All of these can take you max 15 minutes. Easy, tasty and quick.

Oh forgot.

Grab some bread, put some garlic dust, salt and cheese, hoven for 10 minutes. Magic. You can try all kinds of quick pizzas this same way.

MuseedesBeauxArts
10-13-2017, 12:14 AM
Buy bottles of garbanzos already made.

I disagree. You lose both flavor and texture this way. I suppose the convenience vs expense may balance each other out.

Hephaestus
10-13-2017, 12:20 AM
I disagree because garbanzos taste like bad garbage.

MuseedesBeauxArts
10-13-2017, 12:29 AM
I disagree because garbanzos taste like bad garbage.

I'll eat yours, then! :wub:

Hephaestus
10-13-2017, 01:03 AM
I'll eat yours, then! :wub:

This reminds me of the day I traded disgusting beets for delicious figs at a farmer's co-op. Except I don't have garbonzos and you didn't proffer so much as a kohlrabi in trade. <_<

I'd trade straight across for scarlet runner beans--in equivalent or better condition, meaning canned << dried < frozen << fresh.

Unless you also have tahini, and I don't, in which case we should make and split a batch of hummus. If I have tahini and garbanzos I've no reason to share unless you're bringing flatbread--or olives. I'd trade some hummus for olives.

Sound like a deal? In the unlikely event I end up with a bunch of garbonzos and you catch me before I leave them for the local seed loving fauna?

rincon
10-13-2017, 05:25 AM
These are always the most depressing threads on the forum.


I miss the glory days at the old place with rincon Delilah and the food threads there.

:cheers:

We really tried.


I like simple vegetable soups:
https://smittenkitchen.com/2006/09/silky-cauliflower-soup/ I've probably posted this before, but it's beyond simple. You can do with broccoli or zucchini or cauliflower, add some bread and cheese, and you're done. It also freezes well as it's a purée
There's also a red lentil soup with lemon from the NYTimes that I like a lot, same basic idea as above.

To lethe's point, garbanzo beans freeze really well and are useful in pasta, Buddha bowls, hummus, all sorts of goodness! Lately, my freezer has had garbanzos, edamame beans for snacking, broiled eggplant, fresh pasta like tortellini, a baguette. These are the start of some excellent quick dishes.

:wub: smittenkitchen (hey... actually, I think you were the one to turn me on to that site back then) is pretty awesome. Also, you are right about garbanzo beans and KOI is wrong.


I disagree because garbanzos taste like bad garbage.

No.

But, you get a pass because tahini. Wait, wait, wait...

You have a problem with beets? You either haven't had them prepared properly, and you're wrong.

jigglypuff
10-13-2017, 05:38 AM
cheap & fast = using leftovers and eggs, & stir-fry, for me

eggs scrambled into stir-fried kimchi & mushroom

stir-fry any protein & veggie, over brown rice

fried rice using leftover rice & whatever ingredients on hand

chinese stir-fried tomato & egg (season with a dash of sweet, either oyster sauce or sugar, & no salt) over rice, noodles or any carb

noodles topped with stir-fried veggie & any protein

etc. quick, easy, extremely versatile, season to taste.

recommended: top with fresh green onions. don’t fry that shit.

Madrigal
10-13-2017, 05:58 AM
Minced meat is pretty cheap. Cooks fast in a pan and you can mix it with other ingredients to make different meals.

Blorg
10-13-2017, 06:35 AM
couscous with whatever's lying around (for me, it's usually beans, a bell pepper, herbs, salt+pepper, a sprinkle of feta on top)

Horatio
10-13-2017, 09:03 AM
I like simple vegetable soups:
https://smittenkitchen.com/2006/09/silky-cauliflower-soup/ I've probably posted this before, but it's beyond simple. You can do with broccoli or zucchini or cauliflower, add some bread and cheese, and you're done. It also freezes well as it's a purée.

Yup, that goes along with my basic recipe for soup, which is 1 chopped onion, 400g of any vegetable, both roasted in olive oil, then 750ml chicken stock, boil for a while, blend with a hand blender.

I think Gordon Ramsay makes broccoli soup from only fresh broccoli, water and a pinch of salt.

kari
10-13-2017, 10:20 AM
My riceprotip is to add steamed buckwheat to my steamed white rice - white rice is "unhealthy" because of its high glycemic index & buckwheat counteracts it.

I also freeze my rice, reheat it, then freeze it again, so it has more resistant starch.

Faust
10-13-2017, 02:50 PM
My riceprotip is to add steamed buckwheat to my steamed white rice - white rice is "unhealthy" because of its high glycemic index & buckwheat counteracts it.

I also freeze my rice, reheat it, then freeze it again, so it has more resistant starch.

Also choose long-grain basmati for an index of about 58 (as opposed to 90+). Tastes best anyway, whether you douse it in turmeric or not.

Horatio
10-14-2017, 08:56 AM
Here's more fuel for the "Is Horatio gay?" fire. Had a visitor for breakfast this morning and no food in the house, so I had to do some quick baking with stuff that was lying around. Perhaps I'll manage to snap a picture later. Edit: Did manage.

https://i.imgur.com/UasCcoj.jpg?1

Fairly healthy chocolate muffins with peanut butter filling
(Makes 12 – 193 kcal, 7g protein)

Ingredients:
2 large bananas
200g non-fat Greek yoghurt
70ml honey
2 tbsp coconut oil (melted)
50g cocoa powder
2 medium eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract

160g flour (wholewheat or spelt – spelt works great because of its nutty flavour)
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp baking powder
pinch of salt

90g peanut butter

Preheat oven to 180°C. Throw first paragraph of ingredients into blender, blend. In a bowl, mix dry ingredients, then add blended mixture to the flour mixture, mix swiftly with a fork but don't overmix. Spoon a tablespoon of muffin batter into each of the 12 muffin tins, add a teaspoon of peanut butter to each, top with more muffin batter. Bake for 20-25 minutes. While muffins bake, get your arse in gear and clean up your kitchen so that you won't be having breakfast in filth.

Total time including baking and clean up: 30 minutes.

Visitor was impressed. She asked whether she could take home a few, which of course she could. I'm just going to freeze the rest as an insurance for future unexpected visitors.

Mxx
10-14-2017, 10:00 AM
A man who cooks well is fucking sexy. Someone who takes the time to thoroughly prepare a meal you know is going to be amazing in bed. Just a pattern I've observed.

Horatio
10-14-2017, 11:41 AM
A man who cooks well is fucking sexy. Someone who takes the time to thoroughly prepare a meal you know is going to be amazing in bed. Just a pattern I've observed.

Thanks. One can but try.

This goes for both.

Mxx
10-14-2017, 12:14 PM
Thanks. One can but try.

This goes for both.

I'm sorry for implying that you were homo. You're absolutely not a homo. I'd probably want to be with you if I hadn't found someone who could potentially love both the dark side and the light side, the healthy and the unhealthy, the quest for purity and perfection, as well as the need to sometimes just be humanly flawed. Yet to be always guided by a set of principles or a personal code.

But this has nothing to do with cooking, ha.

Hephaestus
10-14-2017, 07:06 PM
The nearly perfect boiled egg--most of the time:

My methods for hard-boiled eggs are likely different from what you might expect. Unless I'm making a batch of pickled eggs, in which case, put 'em in a stockpot of water, boil 'em, peel 'em and put em in a jar of spiced vinegar and see how long I can resist.

But for more common uses, like a quick snack or meal, or an egg salad sandwich, I use either my electric pressure cooker, or a shallow pan, usually an old frying pan.

Fill the pan with enough water to immerse three eggs between half and three quarters of their height. Put on high until the water starts to boil, then turn off the heat. I like to roll the eggs at this point, but I don't think it matters.

Walk away and do some other short term task. Good opportunity to catch up on dishes and laundry. Lot's of cleaning you can do while waiting for things to finish cooking or cooling.

After the eggs are cool enough to handle, but while still too hot to eat, cool them off with water, either from the tap or an ice water bath to make them easier to peel. Even if you miss the moment, I find this method seems to produce eggs that are easier to peel than a stock pot boil does.

The real value of this method though, is in the eating. I find it consistently produces a hard boiled egg with a rich golden yolk untainted by patina of sulphur.

You can get similar results by steaming them. I use a mode on my electric pressure cooker, but the steamer basket of a triple boiler should work the same. The main difference is you steam them at least partially covered. But you turn still stop the heat about the same time the water hits a boil. You'll want to let them cool covered too or they won't cook all the way. It's a little harder to hit, but the end result peels well, if a little more delicately. The shell comes off fine but I've found the flesh tends to be a little softer and easier to chunk with steamed eggs.

For a tasty sandwich, mash the cooked eggs with a fork in a bowl, then mix in some butter and parmesan, spoon the mixture onto a good bread, and enjoy. Heavenly.

Eggs: about 75 calories each, 7 grams of protein. A three egg meal offers 21 grams of good protein at about 225 calories with almost no sugar, and so long as I continue to be able to find eggs for $1 a dozen, costs about twenty-five cents US in basic food materials, and I'd guess a nickel more in water and energy?

Horatio
10-29-2017, 09:30 AM
Fairly healthy chocolate muffins with peanut butter filling
(Makes 12 – 193 kcal, 7g protein)

Ingredients:
2 large bananas
200g non-fat Greek yoghurt
70ml honey
2 tbsp coconut oil
50g cocoa powder
2 medium eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract

160g flour (wholewheat or spelt – spelt works great because of its nutty flavour)
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp baking powder
pinch of salt

90g peanut butter

Preheat oven to 180°. Throw first paragraph of ingredients into blender, blend. In a bowl, mix dry ingredients, then add blended mixture to the flour mixture, mix swiftly. Spoon a tablespoon of muffin batter into each of the 12 muffin tins, add a teaspoon of peanut butter to each, top with more muffin batter. Bake for 25 minutes. While muffins bake, get your arse in gear and clean up your kitchen so that you won't be having breakfast in filth.

Total time including baking and clean up: 30 minutes.

Made those again this morning and tweaked the ingredients. Much, much better, the batter had the consistency of mousse au chocolat, and when baked they came out as fluffy clouds of chocolate. Had one with a glass of milk for breakfast, delicious.

This (http://gimmedelicious.com/2016/12/17/meal-prep-healthy-roasted-chicken-and-veggies/) is awesome and doable, too. Made it for lunch last week and it turned out nicely.

http://gimmedelicious.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Meal-Prep-Roasted-Veggies-and-Chicken-2.jpg

Sinny
10-29-2017, 09:44 AM
Share your recipes. Snacks, lunches, dinner, whatever. No expensive ingredients, if possible, and nothing that takes longer than 20 minutes to prepare (that's the challenge). Maximum efficiency on all three fronts – health, cost, speed – is the goal. Results should taste edible.


Tuna Cucumber Salad
(150 kcal, 30g of protein)

Chop 150g cucumber, 1/2 small red onion, mix with 100g canned tuna (brine, drained), season with pepper and a dash of soy sauce. Done. Need some carbs? The salad also tastes nice on crisp bread.


Soba noodles with chicken and broccoli
(388 kcal, 42g of protein)

Cook 140g of frozen broccoli in salted water. Pan-fry 140g of chicken (any cut), set aside. Remove broccoli from boiling water with slotted spoon, cook soba noodles in same water. Drain, mix with drained brokkoli and diced roast chicken. Season with pan juices, salt and pepper. Done.


Red currant oatmeal chocolate chip muffins (to be used as dessert, a quick breakfast or mid-morning snack)
(160 kcal, 5g of protein each - recipe makes 12 muffins)

Preheat oven to 180°. Throw three ripe bananas, one egg, 60g honey, 180g non-fat Greek yoghurt, 25g coconut oil, a teaspoon of vanilla extract and a pinch of salt into a blender; blend. Mix 180g whole-wheat flour with half a table spoon of baking powder, sift into wet mixture, carefully mix. Gently fold in 80g red currents (or cranberries) and 50g chocolate chips. Fill into a 12-piece muffin pan, bake for 20-25 minutes. Done.


I've got more like these and might illustrate this thread with pictures if general interest exists. Let's see.

I like Tuna (hate fish in general though)

My veggie cousin had a thing for noodles and broccoli :lol:
And a very strange penchant for pepper and vinegar (barf)

I'm a big proponent of eggs.
And tuna.

But my diet is semi awful, semi good.

I often choose not to put anything in it, over crap.

But it varies between extremes wildly. I really could do with a spruce up. And now's the perfect time really.

So.. I'm eagerly tuning into this thread.

Horatio
10-29-2017, 10:41 AM
I like Tuna (hate fish in general though)

My veggie cousin had a thing for noodles and broccoli :lol:
And a very strange penchant for pepper and vinegar (barf)

I'm a big proponent of eggs.
And tuna.

But my diet is semi awful, semi good.

I often choose not to put anything in it, over crap.

But it varies between extremes wildly. I really could do with a spruce up. And now's the perfect time really.

So.. I'm eagerly tuning into this thread.

I'm like that, too. For four weeks all goes well, I manage to go shopping and prepare stuff in advance, and then I fall off the wagon for a week or two. Eventually I feel like crap (no energy, constantly tired) and get back on it again.

It is a lot easier if one tries to make stuff taste good and try to add variety. I'd never have the discipline to only eat soup or the same thing for a week.

itch
10-29-2017, 12:52 PM
Trying to start eating "right" feels like trying to stop a lot of "bad habits". I'm fortunate that I can eat the same thing for a few weeks if I like it. Udon for a month? I'm in.

Horatio
10-29-2017, 01:02 PM
Trying to start eating "right" feels like trying to stop a lot of "bad habits". I'm fortunate that I can eat the same thing for a few weeks if I like it. Udon for a month? I'm in.

Yes, the Japanese are very inventive when it comes to soup/noodle toppings.

http://jpninfo.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/sanuki-udon-types.jpg

Mxx
10-29-2017, 01:05 PM
I'm fortunate that I can eat the same thing for a few weeks if I like it.
Ha, same here, when it comes to feeding myself, I'm definitely on the spectrum. Food has two roles for me: fuel to get me through the day, and every once in a while a pleasurable delight. I do like my fuel to taste good, but for the most part, it's an inconvenience and I try to get eating out of the way as expediently as possible.

itch
10-29-2017, 01:17 PM
Yes, the Japanese are very inventive when it comes to soup/noodle toppings.


Now I want to watch Tampopo and slurp noodles all day. Not gonna happen but I can dream...


Ha, same here, when it comes to feeding myself, I'm definitely on the spectrum. Food has two roles for me: fuel to get me through the day, and every once in a while a pleasurable delight. I do like my fuel to taste good, but for the most part, it's an inconvenience and I try to get eating out of the way as expediently as possible.

I have a third role for food: hangry prevention. It's the most socially conscious thing I do on any given day, in order to protect the rest of the world from my apocalyptic reaction to low blood glucose levels (I will perpetrate crimes against humanity they won't put in the history books out of fear someone might copycat).

I used to eat super fast but these days I'm like the last person still eating at the table.

jigglypuff
10-29-2017, 05:12 PM
Yes, the Japanese are very inventive when it comes to soup/noodle toppings.

ya but do you slurp (http://forums.intpcomplex.com/showthread.php?4804-Noodle-Eating-Etiquette)

Vison
10-29-2017, 09:39 PM
Thirding the wonder of eggs. Getting a tiny pot or one of those silicon egg poachers is worth it for convince. Poached eggs are utterly delicious and decadent with a pinch of salt and pepper by themselves once you the timing down. They can be thrown on top or rice, lentils and some beans for added flavor and protein.

Lentils are incredibly versatile and can be spiced and adjusted in a million ways, very similar to rice that way. Add various spices, meats, veggies, egg.

Pre-celiac days I was a huge pan of hand pies. The dough (https://www.thespruce.com/spiced-beef-hand-pies-2355782) is very simple and you can fill it all sorts of things, ground meat mixtures, casserole fillings, lentils or beans. You can make a whole mess of them at once and freeze, they're super convienent and delicious.

Starjots
10-30-2017, 05:01 PM
Make sure the budget is digestible. Shred and add your favorite salad dressing. Enjoy.

Lurker
10-31-2017, 04:11 PM
1/4 cup of rolled oats, dry measure
add 1/2 cup of water
nuke 30 seconds
soaks for a few hrs in fridge

add 2% Fage greek yogurt plain, 1/2 small container

add cup of frozen berries (halfway thawed, oops)



1 slice Ezekial Bread, 1 and 1/2 tablespoons of natural enough peanut butter
1 Kiwi or orange


Trader Joe's Cod Provençale with Ratatouille & Rice, half serving

................................

starla
11-01-2017, 02:56 AM
2 cups well-cooked pinto beans
1 or 2 tomatoes, chopped
1/4 to half an onion, coarsely chopped
cumin (don't skimp on the amount)
thyme
salt & pepper
add all ingredients to a pan and cook until the tomato breaks down and you have stewed beans.

Vison
11-02-2017, 12:34 AM
Get a squash that looks like it would hold an egg in each half if you cut it in half.

Cut that squash in half and gut.
Slather in cooking oil and spices and bake squash until soft.
Crack an egg into each half and bake to your level of egg doneness

Feel free to add toppings such as tomatoes with herbs, sausage, shredded hard cheese, ect

Alternatively, if you are cooking for a group cut the squash into rings and crack an egg per ring.

Madrigal
11-02-2017, 03:10 AM
2 cups well-cooked pinto beans
1 or 2 tomatoes, chopped
1/4 to half an onion, coarsely chopped
cumin (don't skimp on the amount)
thyme
salt & pepper
add all ingredients to a pan and cook until the tomato breaks down and you have stewed beans.

Speaking of beans, you can make bean paste with black beans and have a tub of it in the fridge, ready to spread on hot flour tortillas, with spicy tomato sauce or other vegetables added to it. It even makes a good breakfast when you just eat tortilla + bean paste + coffee.

Dated a Honduran that used to make it all the time, I don't eat it anymore but it's a super cheap meal.

starla
11-02-2017, 03:24 AM
I eat a lot of beans. Remember when politicians were doing that food stamp challenge, trying to eat for a week on $33 or whatever it was and whining about how hungry they were all the time? I would ace that, probably with money and food left over. And I eat super healthy these days.

Fitz
11-02-2017, 04:29 AM
Speaking of beans, you can make bean paste with black beans and have a tub of it in the fridge, ready to spread on hot flour tortillas, with spicy tomato sauce or other vegetables added to it. It even makes a good breakfast when you just eat tortilla + bean paste + coffee.

Dated a Honduran that used to make it all the time, I don't eat it anymore but it's a super cheap meal.

You guys didn't know about refried beans and bean burritos?

Lilith
11-02-2017, 06:02 AM
You guys didn't know about refried beans and bean burritos?
Dude, refried beans taste like shit. :|

itch
11-02-2017, 06:06 AM
Dude, refried beans taste like shit. :|

But that's why peppers!!

Fitz
11-02-2017, 06:25 AM
Dude, refried beans taste like shit. :|


Then don't eat them? You're not really giving me a lot to work with here. Is there a particular taste you don't like? What was the flavor profile? The recipe?

Madrigal
11-04-2017, 04:02 AM
Boiled carrots with olive oil and salt are becoming my favorite dinner (mostly cause I'm fucking starving by then since I've already gobbled down my calories for the day at that point).

You feel full as if you just ate potato! Luckily, I like carrots. :ph34r:

Vison
11-04-2017, 06:05 AM
Throw em in the oven all slathered in oil and some salt. They're divine roasted too.

Grape Jelly
11-04-2017, 07:46 AM
my poop has 8 grams of protein. I should go feed it to a homeless guy.

I like the protein snack packs they got at wal mart, with the diced deli meat, peanuts, and Chocolate covered berries.

Faust
11-04-2017, 06:24 PM
Throw em in the oven all slathered in oil and some salt. They're divine roasted too.

Better than boiled I'd say, though I do it out of convenience more often than not while meat's in the oven. I have a friend who just nukes some of their veg (like broccoli) and it seems to work for them.


I eat a lot of beans. Remember when politicians were doing that food stamp challenge, trying to eat for a week on $33 or whatever it was and whining about how hungry they were all the time? I would ace that, probably with money and food left over. And I eat super healthy these days.

I'd have my beans and still fail right now :S. But I'm splurging on a few items. I love a good baked bean recipe, something I generally avoid due to sugar content, cooking time and lack of an ovenproof crock pot. Here's one my mom tried, was sublime:

2 lbs dry navy beans, soaked overnight and drained
3 cloves garlic minced
1 large white onion diced
2 poblano chiles seeded and diced
1 cup double-smoked bacon diced
1 cup molasses
1 cup prepared chili sauce
1/2 brown sugar
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1 tbsp dijon mustard
2 tsp salt

place beans in large ovenproof crockpot, cover with water
bring to boil, reduce heat to low, simmer stirring occasionally until beans tender 1-1.5 hours
preheat oven to 325F
add remaining ingredients to pot, stir thoroughly
cover and place in oven 3h, stirring every 30 min
remove cover and cook one more hour
stores in fridge for a week or freezes for 3 months

Horatio, I think I'm going to put your muffin recipe to the test. I'll unload it on some friends and take all the credit.

Faust
11-04-2017, 08:11 PM
Speaking of beans, you can make bean paste with black beans and have a tub of it in the fridge, ready to spread on hot flour tortillas, with spicy tomato sauce or other vegetables added to it. It even makes a good breakfast when you just eat tortilla + bean paste + coffee.

Dated a Honduran that used to make it all the time, I don't eat it anymore but it's a super cheap meal.

Echoing this - https://www.budgetbytes.com/2017/07/enfrijoladas-tortillas-in-black-bean-sauce/

interprétation erronée
11-04-2017, 08:56 PM
Pssht, ectomorphs!

Here's a recipe for muscular active types that tastes good and sticks to the ribs.

Recipe: Slop

1 lb ground turkey/beef
1 cup soy sauce
1 cup worcestershire sauce
1 packet of brown gravy
1 cups rice
1 rice cooker
1 non-stick skillet
1 spatula
1 hefty appetite

Fry, mix, eat. Done.

Thank me later.

Horatio
11-04-2017, 10:30 PM
Pssht, ectomorphs!

Here's a recipe for muscular active types that tastes good and sticks to the ribs.

Recipe: Slop

1 lb ground turkey/beef
1 cup soy sauce
1 cup worcestershire sauce
1 packet of brown gravy
1 cups rice
1 rice cooker
1 non-stick skillet
1 spatula
1 hefty appetite

Fry, mix, eat. Done.

Thank me later.

Fuck me, is that supposed to be a single serving?

Horatio
11-07-2017, 10:22 PM
Made these today (https://www.ambitiouskitchen.com/2014/04/healthy-sweet-potato-black-bean-avocado-breakfast-burritos/), had one right away, froze the rest for future breakfasts. Accidentally bought tortillas that were too small because I am a gringo from a continent where tortilla means egg omelette and I had no clue that those other tortillas come in different sizes. @Neville, somebody mentioned that you're Mexican, I think you should grace us with a Mexican food 101.

Anyway... those burritos were delicious. I usually dislike both sweet potatoes and beans, but the cumin, enchilada sauce and cheese (I used English cheddar) just work together perfectly. Instead of 8 egg whites I used 4 eggs (because what the hell are you supposed to do with 8 lone egg yolks?). Not my picture:

https://www.ambitiouskitchen.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/5-IMG_3418.jpg

Fitz
11-07-2017, 10:49 PM
@Neville, somebody mentioned that you're Mexican, I think you should grace us with a Mexican food 101.

Yeah, I'm half. I can post some stuff soonish and give you my take at least. I don't know how well it's going to adhere to the fast, cheap, healthy guidelines though.

stuck
11-07-2017, 10:51 PM
Fry, mix, eat. Done.

cook the rice first, right? RIGHT?

jesus man, chop up a pepper.

interprétation erronée
11-08-2017, 12:29 AM
jesus man, chop up a pepper.

i have another recipe for you. it's called anus clay.

don't eat vegetables for a whole week. don't drink water for a whole week = anus clay :D

Hephaestus
12-06-2017, 03:55 AM
Lentils are incredibly versatile and can be spiced and adjusted in a million ways, very similar to rice that way. Add various spices, meats, veggies, egg.

Seconding this. My preference is orange/red lentils as they disintegrate during cooking so they're an automagic puree. Cooked using chicken stock/broth and they make a tasty burrito filling/dip/porridge.

Mung beans work similarly, but aren't quite as tasty to me. However, I have had good results blending cooked mung beans with eggs and cheese then pan-frying the result into tasty little nuggets.

pensive_pilgrim
12-06-2017, 07:50 AM
Pssht, ectomorphs!

Here's a recipe for muscular active types that tastes good and sticks to the ribs.

Recipe: Slop

1 lb ground turkey/beef
1 cup soy sauce
1 cup worcestershire sauce
1 packet of brown gravy
1 cups rice
1 rice cooker
1 non-stick skillet
1 spatula
1 hefty appetite

Fry, mix, eat. Done.

Thank me later.

With that much salt you probably don't even need to cook it

Horatio
12-13-2017, 12:00 PM
If you're not vegetarian, try frying and cooking with lard. It costs a fraction of both olive oil and butter and yields an incredibly rich taste.

Example:

Farmer's Breakfast
- potatoes (firm, waxy kind)
- lard
- bacon (the cheapest will do fine)
- half an onion
- 1-2 eggs
- salt, pepper, paprika
- gherkins

Boil firm, waxy potatoes slices in salted water until almost done. (This can be done in advance to save time.) Heat lard in a skillet until it is very hot. Place boiled potato slices in skillet in one layer. While they are roasting, chop half an onion and some bacon. Sprinkle roast potatoes with pepper, salt and a pinch of paprika, then flip. (They will already be gorgeously crispy on one side.) Add chopped onion and bacon to the pan, but don't mix until the other side of the potatoes is crispy as well. Mix eventually, roast for another few moments and arrange it all on a plate. In the hot pan, quickly scramble an egg or two (this will literally ten seconds or less). Add the scrambled egg(s) to your plated potatoes. Garnish with parsley and grated cheddar cheese (optional). Serve with gherkins.

Delicious, hearty, with lots of fibre and quite a bit of protein. Whipped this up for lunch today and was quite taken aback by the rich flavour. I also prepped more boiled potatoes, chopped onion and bacon than I needed, so I can simply throw this together tomorrow for breakfast in 5-8 minutes.

pensive_pilgrim
02-21-2018, 03:43 AM
Every morning I put 2/3 cup oat flour in a blender bottle with a spoonful of instant coffee and a spoonful of splenda. I really like this quick breakfast, but it's not quite filling enough. I've been eating boiled eggs in the morning too. I have the oat flour shake again for lunch but I add a scoop of unflavored whey. I get the oat flour and whey from the bulk bins at Winco, they're very well-priced. Unfortunately, the last couple times I've been to Winco they have had no bulk oat flour and a sign saying the warehouse is out. Since I've come to rely on this stuff, I decided to order a cheap food processor so I can make my own. I should have done that a long time ago.

Now I'm also considering what else I can do with the food processor and how to improve my meal shakes. I immediately thought of almond flour and coconut flour. Both of these might make my meal shake more filling, although almonds are a bit expensive and unsweetened coconut isn't tasty. I'm also considering getting some maltodextrin and trying to make peanut flour. I have my budget in mind here, I would rather my ingredients be closer to $1/lb than $5/lb, and I also don't want it to taste gross. I want to stick with the blender bottle too because it's quick and easy to clean and reuse. Also, I have the option of loading dry ingredients into the blender bottle and carrying it with me if I won't have time to come home for lunch. This could become important for sticking to a healthy diet when I get a job. Peanuts are pretty cheap and tasty, so if I can find maltodextrin for a decent price that will probably work well.

Maltodextrin is just what I've seen recommended for mixing with fatty things to turn them into powder. I'm not a fan of its high glycemic index though.

pensive_pilgrim
02-22-2018, 03:55 AM
Unfortunately I couldn't find any maltodextrin at Winco. I did discover almond meal for only about $3.50/lb, which is significantly cheaper than almonds. But dry roasted peanuts are only about $1.50/lb and I can find maltodextrin online for just a little more than $2/lb, so I'm still gonna try to make my own powdered peanut butter. There was actually peanut butter powder in the bulk section at Winco, the kind that's defatted... and with added sugar :/

I'm getting way more protein than I need right now, like 250 grams/day, so I'm not gonna buy more whey when it runs out and I'm not gonna fret too much about the macros of almonds vs peanuts vs defatted peanut flour.

Interesting thing about the Winco bulk section: almond meal is cheaper than almonds, coconut flour is cheaper than coconuts, but oat flour is about $.70 more expensive per pound than oats if I buy a 25 lb bag. At the rate I've been going through oat flour I'll be saving myself like $.28 per day, which isn't bad.

I'm gonna experiment with using this food processor with vegetables too. I really wish I had a dehydrator so I could make powdered greens, but that's not in the budget right now. Store-bought powdered greens are ridiculously expensive.

edit: All the sources I'm seeing recommend tapioca maltodextrin for making fats into powder, but that stuff is way more expensive than plain old "maltodextrin" (which I'm assuming is from corn). I do see a blog post saying that tapioca flour will work somewhat, making a not-quite-perfect facsimile. I'm not sure whether I should order a five lb bag of corn maltodextrin or just use tapioca flour instead. Neither of these will be useful for any other purpose if they don't work, but the tapioca flour I could get in a small amount at least. I guess that's my answer. And I just got back from the store :/

stuck
02-22-2018, 05:34 AM
Green Smoothies

Aim for 6 oz of greens and 100-200 calories of fruit. Alternate greens, don't eat spinach or kale every day- the reason is because different vegetable groups contain different "anti-nutrients" that can be harmful in excess. It supposedly takes a LOT of overeating specific vegetables to create a problem, but it's good to rotate anyway for nutritional purposes.

Here's a rotation of 100-250 calorie recipes that I've found to be very effective and extremely easy. takes about a minute from opening the fridge to cleaning the unit:

spinach/apple
kale/banana
celery/pear
lettuce/lemon/orange (with peel)

yeah the lettuce and lemon/orange is intense. use organic lemons or oranges if you're going to use the peel. the peel is very good for you and has stuff the meat doesn't, but they also absorb a lot of pesticide. you can also zest the whole damn thing if you can't do organic, but that's against my laziness.

banana will cover just about anything you try to juice. it's the choice, for instance, if you're trying to juice frozen broccoli.

All Other Smoothies

carrots, oats, peanut butter, coconut oil, chia seed, all kinds of nuts and seeds (sunflower, pumpkin, cashew, almond, peanuts) frozen berries, black beans, red beans (beans are great to replace protein powder), frozen pineapple, frozen mango, almond milk.

I'm trying cooked sweet potato tomorrow morning. You can juice raw sweet potato, it's very sweet but has a fairly indigestible anti-nutrient, that you might or might not be able to tolerate.

I proselytize because, after all my quests for halting my obesity, this has been the easiest way. I feel so full from eating two glasses of this stuff a day that it becomes very easy to stay within a caloric restriction. I haven't felt deprived after two months of sticking with it, and I've lost about 15 pounds. I just drink a smoothie in between my cups of coffee and then eat a normal meal. bam.

Oh, and it's also cheaper than eating a high protein diet to the same effect or processed food.

It'll make you shit your brains out at first, but your gut flora adapts.

pensive_pilgrim
02-23-2018, 11:45 PM
stuck, what kind of blender do you have and how well does it work?

With my cheap food processor, my homemade oat flour is significantly grittier than store-bought. Actually the first time I made it, it was way too coarse and there would still be a blob of oats left in the bottle after drinking everything down. I ran this batch through for about another 60 seconds and it's much better now, still a little gritty but it all goes down smoothly enough. I think the GI is better though, it keeps me feeling full longer.

stuck
02-24-2018, 02:02 AM
stuck, what kind of blender do you have and how well does it work?

factory refurb'd vitamix 5200, it cost about $250 and has a 5 year warranty. I've never known a blender before, but I can easily imagine I'll never want to use any other. I haven't tried to make flour in it, but I have made sunflower butter out of seeds. You can get a "dry container" with a different shaped blade that's suitable for flour and nut butter.

for the green smoothies, it turns the plant fiber into foam. It pulverizes the living fuck out of even small seeds like chia seeds. i never notice when i throw oats in it, and I've even been using steel cut oats because that's all we have right now. Apparently you can use it to make and heat up soup, because the blade speed makes enough friction to get it steaming.

if you wanted to make flour often, i'd search around to see if it's sufficient... i think that's probably one of the hardest jobs a blender can do. I'm fairly certain it would be able to. I guess the difference between it and the 100 dollar superblenders are that the blades pulverize instead of slicing- they're not sharp. it's all a very strong motor and a nice efficient mechanism.

pensive_pilgrim
02-24-2018, 07:06 AM
factory refurb'd vitamix 5200, it cost about $250 and has a 5 year warranty. I've never known a blender before, but I can easily imagine I'll never want to use any other. I haven't tried to make flour in it, but I have made sunflower butter out of seeds. You can get a "dry container" with a different shaped blade that's suitable for flour and nut butter.

for the green smoothies, it turns the plant fiber into foam. It pulverizes the living fuck out of even small seeds like chia seeds. i never notice when i throw oats in it, and I've even been using steel cut oats because that's all we have right now. Apparently you can use it to make and heat up soup, because the blade speed makes enough friction to get it steaming.

if you wanted to make flour often, i'd search around to see if it's sufficient... i think that's probably one of the hardest jobs a blender can do. I'm fairly certain it would be able to. I guess the difference between it and the 100 dollar superblenders are that the blades pulverize instead of slicing- they're not sharp. it's all a very strong motor and a nice efficient mechanism.

Yeah, that has a motor that's nearly three times as powerful as the one in my $30 food processor. I will just have to be fine with my gritty oat drinks until the day when I have enough income to justify spending more. My dream is to have my own Robot Coupe. Maybe I'll just build my own out of a lawnmower.

stuck
02-24-2018, 07:46 PM
I will just have to be fine with my gritty oat drinks until the day when I have enough income to justify spending more.

you might also try the overnight oats thing as a way to prep them for your shakes- just leave them soaking in a jar with almond milk or whatever, it should soften them up to where they liquify pretty easily.

flurps
02-24-2018, 08:55 PM
Is it that hard to cook a pot of quick oats for 5 minutes and throw some fruit in?

pensive_pilgrim
02-24-2018, 09:10 PM
you might also try the overnight oats thing as a way to prep them for your shakes- just leave them soaking in a jar with almond milk or whatever, it should soften them up to where they liquify pretty easily.
I might give it a try but for me it's probably not worth the effort of planning ahead. The grittiness is noticeable but not that bad.


Is it that hard to cook a pot of quick oats for 5 minutes and throw some fruit in?
And then shovel it into my mouth one spoonful at a time? No thanks, I like my meals that I can just chug in a few seconds. Especially in the daytime when I'm still trying to get things done, I don't want eating to be this whole thing that I have to sit down for. The more effort it is, the more likely I'll put it off or take shortcuts, and end up either too hungry while trying to do things or eating some packaged sugary crap.

Starjots
03-06-2018, 08:21 PM
And then shovel it into my mouth one spoonful at a time? No thanks, I like my meals that I can just chug in a few seconds. Especially in the daytime when I'm still trying to get things done, I don't want eating to be this whole thing that I have to sit down for. The more effort it is, the more likely I'll put it off or take shortcuts, and end up either too hungry while trying to do things or eating some packaged sugary crap.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Pir2fDv-Us

rhinosaur
03-06-2018, 10:36 PM
You can sautee pretty much any vegetable with a little garlic and salt in a couple minutes. Broccoli, asparagus, kale, snap peas, greens, cauliflower, etc. That's our easy weeknight vegetable.

Tougher veggies like beets, hard squashes, sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, etc. can be steamed very quickly too.

If you can remember to soak beans, they pressure cook in about 10 minutes.

Rice, quinoa, lentils boil up in about 10-20 minutes. Super easy if you have a rice cooker, otherwise the microwave works great.

pensive_pilgrim
03-12-2018, 08:06 PM
I just had my first serving of what I'm calling "peanoats". I blended 200 g peanuts with 400 g oats. The resulting mixture isn't gritty at all and is on the edge of being powdery, although it will compress easily into a kind of dry dough. For this reason I'm going to need to measure it into the blender bottle by weight and not volume. After drinking there were still a few clumps on the bottom of the bottle. I'll use warm water and shake more vigorously than I have been with just oats. The drink itself was very smooth though, a big improvement over my homemade oat flour with added almond flour. And it seems quite filling. The taste is fine but I'm sure a little salt would make it much better, so I might add some with the next batch.

pensive_pilgrim
03-15-2018, 08:00 PM
Peanoats V2 is a 3:1 blend of oats to peanuts, and it seems perfect. Grittiness and clumpiness are both minimal. It takes probably five minutes to make 640 grams, which is enough for about three days at my rate of consumption. I just need to go buy more peanuts and I'll whip up about a month's worth. Average price of this stuff is under $1/lb and the macros would work for consuming this all day long if I wasn't trying to build muscle. That means I could feed myself for less than $2/day if I wanted, including the cost of a multivitamin, and this stuff tastes good. I've never tried Soylent but I would bet my product is way better for the money.

Sappho
05-12-2018, 06:38 PM
Yesterday I managed to cook up five meals for less than 10€, yay!

Roast a chicken (generously prepped with spices of your choice and occasionally basted with butter), meanwhile chop 3-4 large sweet potatoes and a head of broccoli. Divide the roast chicken into four neat portions, eat the inevitably occurring scraggly bits, wings + the oysters NOW. Roast the sweet potato cubes and broccoli florets in the chicken juices. Divide roast vegetables evenly into meal prep containers, eat overhead NOW.

I just heated up one of those prepped meals and it was delicious. I'd planned to eat it with some avocado slices but I forgot; this stuff doesn't even need any kind of sauce, it's so good. A dollop of herb creme fraiche goes magnificently with those sweet potatoes, too.

ACow
05-12-2018, 11:46 PM
I actually had something very similar for dinner last night.

Chicken breast with roast vegetables on polenta bed.

Ingredients: chicken breast, an apple, red onion, spinach leafs, , beans and polenta. Side ingredients: salt, pepper, butter, chicken stock, balsamic vinegar, sugar.

Chicken breasts are cut in half lengthwise, seasoned with salt and pepper and pan fried in a little olive oil.

apple and onion are quartered, splash with olive oil, salt, pepper, a minuscule dusting of sugar, and balsamic.roast in oven on 200 C for 10 minutes. Then add beans. Roast another 10.

Meanwhile, polenta is cooked with a splash of milk, chicken stock, little bit of butter (sorry for not writing out entire measurements).

Finally, the spinach leaves need nothing more than having boiled water poured over them at serving time to make them wilt.

All done, you can have 4 adult sized servings quite easily. If polenta isn't ones thing, just choose another grain and cook it in some stock instead.

jigglypuff
05-14-2018, 08:51 PM
https://i.imgur.com/o0lNAaY.jpg

i cooked for myself and grandma today and decided to meal prep for the week cuz i know i won't have any time to cook...

+ baked teriyaki salmon with garlic and lemon pepper
+ teriyaki mushroom & tofu stir-fry
+ broccoli roasted in the leftover stir-fry juice
+ carrots & potatoes roasted in the leftover salmon juice
+ brown rice

i ended up with 4 of these meals (total 6, but grandma and i both ate one), each with some of everything over brown rice.

i'm so happy i did this!!! saves so much time and money.

i need to invest in a good set of stackable containers though.

Faust
05-14-2018, 10:39 PM
Made pineapple pizza on Friday. Had a bunch of leftover pineapple, so.. decided on pineapple chicken. The lazy way. Made a sauce with soy, sriracha, honey, vinegar, red wine vinegar, some flour, and squeezed the juice out of a few pieces of pineapple. Slathered on chicken thighs with paprika already sprinkled on them, added chopped turnip and carrot, threw it all in the oven.

---

I love good quality bread, but I am a cheap bastard. Now's probably a good time to experiment with baking bread at home. I'm considering finding a small kitchen scale for the task. I'm going to make this my mission next Sunday.

I've found that a reliable, cheap way to get your omega-3s is canned sardines. They're like $2-3 CAD a pop and good for either one hefty portion or several small ones, which I tend to opt for, adding them to my lunches. By contrast even the cheaper cuts of fresh fish are still maybe $5-6 a fillet. The tiny bones are also edible and make for a calcium boost. I had concerns about the likely overcooking of canned products, but if the can says it has such and such amount of omega-3, it's there, so whatever. Cons: not at all delicious. Sriracha that shit.

Limes
05-14-2018, 11:23 PM
I highly recommend getting an instant pot in addition to a slow cooker. Some of the youtube videos are really good. For example, the methods of cooking whole chickens are realy good, they can be a lot like real rotisserie chicken and it just falls off the bone (dryness is the enemy of meal prep chicken)

I've noticed, somewhat by accident, that my local supermarket tends to cut price all of its meats in the late afternoon/evening of Fridays, so when I get home from whatever flight I've been on and get to the surpermarket in the early hours, I'm finding all these great meat and fish deals that would work perfectly for budget eaters, equipped with slow and pressure cookers (I highly recommend the instant pot programmable pressure cooker)

Slow cook that chuck beef until it falls apart!

There are some great tips online for using salt as a tenderizer too, where, when applied properly, you can't tell the difference between expensive steak and cheap "chuck".
e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RWJEOScToE

Fitz
05-15-2018, 12:18 AM
I highly recommend getting an instant pot in addition to a slow cooker. Some of the youtube videos are really good. For example, the methods of cooking whole chickens are realy good, they can be a lot like real rotisserie chicken and it just falls off the bone (dryness is the enemy of meal prep chicken)

I've noticed, somewhat by accident, that my local supermarket tends to cut price all of its meats in the late afternoon/evening of Fridays, so when I get home from whatever flight I've been on and get to the surpermarket in the early hours, I'm finding all these great meat and fish deals that would work perfectly for budget eaters, equipped with slow and pressure cookers (I highly recommend the instant pot programmable pressure cooker)

Slow cook that chuck beef until it falls apart!

I use mine to make lazy ass french dips and italian pork sandwiches. Way easier than using a stove top pressure cooker.



There are some great tips online for using salt as a tenderizer too, where, when applied properly, you can't tell the difference between expensive steak and cheap "chuck".
e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RWJEOScToE

https://i.imgur.com/pbOjSoO.gif

Have you actually had an expensive steak? Drybrining is a great technique but it's not magic.

Limes
05-15-2018, 01:31 AM
I use mine to make lazy ass french dips and italian pork sandwiches. Way easier than using a stove top pressure cooker.


French dips and pulled pork...at the glory hole.



Have you actually had an expensive steak? Drybrining is a great technique but it's not magic.

I've been to Morton's a few times, but the best steak I ever had was Argentinian steak at a Barbecue in Florida, that simply had some light salt (not dry rub) sprinkled on it during cooking.

Fitz
05-15-2018, 03:42 AM
French dips and pulled pork...at the glory hole.

See you there.




I've been to Morton's a few times, but the best steak I ever had was Argentinian steak at a Barbecue in Florida, that simply had some light salt (not dry rub) sprinkled on it during cooking.

Argentinian steak is dope. Almost makes up for Argentinians.

pensive_pilgrim
05-15-2018, 04:34 AM
I buy about ten pounds of chicken breast at a time at Winco, and I dice it all up and portion it into 8 oz baggies, date them and put them in the freezer. It takes about 30 minutes. I eat one bag each day, so when I pull one from the fridge I replace it with one from the freezer. I cook it with a can of beans and 8 oz of frozen veggies, all in the same pan. Sometimes I do potatoes instead of beans, then I have to dice and boil the potatoes. I season it with tony chachere creole seasoning. The total cost is around $2, it's healthy and filling and tastes better than most food I get from restaurants, if only because I cook things the right amount of time and get to eat it right when it's ready and steaming.

Before bed I slice up four apples and have those with a pint of fat-free cottage cheese. Fuji apples are delicious and they satisfy the munchies I get from my night-time sleepy pill, and I can eat more than a pound of them for under 300 calories.

Between the above and my morning peanoats (less than 20 cents per 100 gram serving) I estimate that I'm feeding myself on less than $5 per day. I am dieting right now and averaging around 2300 calories per day, so when I start trying to gain weight again I can expect that to go up by a few dollars. That said, I think I've got the "quick, healthy eating on a budget" down pretty well.

Limes
05-15-2018, 02:25 PM
Argentinian steak is dope. Almost makes up for Argentinians.

It's so good, that if you asked: Black, Crippled, Mexican, or Argentinian?
-I'd probably go with Argentinean.

BarIII
05-15-2018, 03:16 PM
The Russian place where I got my broccoli yesterday sells huge bunches that make about 6 servings. I freeze three of them in the same dish. They're dry enough that I can pop out one at a time when they're frozen.

https://i.imgur.com/zxNvlgm.jpg

Madrigal
05-22-2018, 04:20 AM
Argentinian steak is dope. Almost makes up for Argentinians.


It's so good, that if you asked: Black, Crippled, Mexican, or Argentinian?
-I'd probably go with Argentinean.

You guys should watch "Asado" on Netflix.

Edit: Todo sobre el asado

Makers!*
05-22-2018, 04:25 AM
Ingredients:

Chicken breast or petite sirloin
rice or potato
spinach

Cook chicken or sirloin on skillet. Microwave potato/ boil minute rice. Take spinach out fridge.

Assemble on plate and eat hot with desired condiments.

under 5 dollars. 15 minutes. I eat this every night.

Madrigal
05-22-2018, 08:35 AM
Ingredients:

Chicken breast or petite sirloin
rice or potato
spinach

Cook chicken or sirloin on skillet. Microwave potato/ boil minute rice. Take spinach out fridge.

Assemble on plate and eat hot with desired condiments.

under 5 dollars. 15 minutes. I eat this every night.

I love spinach but I never know what the hell to do with it besides eat it boiled. There has to be a mid-point between eating it boiled and making spinach pie (or something else that's complicated like that).

Fitz
05-22-2018, 09:02 AM
I love spinach but I never know what the hell to do with it besides eat it boiled. There has to be a mid-point between eating it boiled and making spinach pie (or something else that's complicated like that).

creamed spinach is easy and fast and I guess healthy if you hate yourself.

Makers!*
05-22-2018, 12:00 PM
I love spinach but I never know what the hell to do with it besides eat it boiled. There has to be a mid-point between eating it boiled and making spinach pie (or something else that's complicated like that).

I just eat it raw, like a salad,

Faust
05-22-2018, 03:04 PM
I love spinach but I never know what the hell to do with it besides eat it boiled. There has to be a mid-point between eating it boiled and making spinach pie (or something else that's complicated like that).

Braise it with chickpeas, scramble it in your eggs, pitch it in your pasta sauce. Like other greens it shrinks and is fairly unobtrusive when you add it to dishes. I just eat it raw for the most part.

Spinach is a go-to for me due to the magnesium content. It has modest calcium as well, I'm lacking in that.

jigglypuff
06-07-2018, 06:04 PM
i'm not sure if this warrants a separate thread, but i'm wondering if anybody here does meal prep and what your strategies are.

this has been saving me a lot of time and money lately but i've got issues/questions

1) the foods i tend to make are "stinky" at least to the american palate. i'm not even doing fish anymore, i went vegetarian for my meal preps, but using generous amount of onions, garlic, etc. will stink up a room. this isn't a problem i have when just cooking for the moment, and i didn't really think about it. luckily this is easily fixed.

2) it's getting to be summer here and i'm looking for delicious vegetarian (-versatile) recipes to make that you can eat cold. recommendations?

yes, i'm using google, but you guys are good at convenient lazy shit, haha.

3) i'm also wondering generally about your meal prep schedules, and any tips on keeping specific types of dishes or ingredients fresh.