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Madrigal
11-16-2017, 05:15 AM
Anybody have them?

I get muscle pain in my back when I'm sitting down working for long hours. Drives me crazy.

stuck
11-16-2017, 07:00 AM
yep

probably also from sitting in a chair wrong.

scarydoor
11-16-2017, 07:16 AM
My work has desks that wind up or down. I spent a few days last week standing and spine felt fairly great. But also I feel less productive while standing. Like I'm intermittently thinking "this fucking sucks having to stand all the time". I like that feeling of slopping back into the chair having imagination time. If I could just consistently sit with a proper posture, it would all be okay. But I don't.

Faust
11-16-2017, 09:23 PM
yep

probably also from sitting in a chair wrong.

If you're sitting all day, posture won't keep you from getting pain eventually even if it makes a good deal of difference. I like to get up often and will probably invest in a standing desk in the future.

My late night stretching helps.

Hephaestus
11-16-2017, 09:28 PM
Have you considered the marvel of good massage?

Or sleeping on the floor?

Light Leak
11-16-2017, 09:36 PM
Yeah, I have a herniated disc. I asked my spine doctor if a standing desk would help. He advised against getting one, and said it's better to just stand up every hour and walk around even for just a minute. He said that standing for long periods of time causes it's own back issues (compresses the spine and stuff) that he predicts people with standing desks will have to deal with in several years.

Starjots
11-16-2017, 09:49 PM
DUP

Starjots
11-16-2017, 09:51 PM
My lower back has been 'crinkly' since about age 50. It doesn't hurt yet, but I think a lot of the good stuff has worn away due to bad posture and rather long and heavy torso.

My upper back used to get quite tight due to stress and aforementioned reasons. An occasional massage and a few visits to a chiropracter did wonders for that.

It's not the back, but for stress release I massage my own head (joking aside) to move the scalp around.

stigmatica
11-16-2017, 09:57 PM
Anybody have them?

I get muscle pain in my back when I'm sitting down working for long hours. Drives me crazy.
This thread was click bait for me. Probably because I'm "that age".

Back pain is just a part of life at this point. Something I learn to turn off as background noise.

Mind you, I don't have (as far as I know) any back issues that prevent me from lifting heavy things and such. I just wake up every morning in need of a God Damned warmup. Or, worse, wake up at 3AM... 5AM.. 6AM.. in need of a position change because my back is waking me up. My back hurts at some level 24/7. It doesn't matter what I've given my back to do, mind you. Whether he's bailing hay or watching TV he hurts the same amount. It's the time of day that matters. He's a night person. In the morning, Mr. Back takes longer to wake up than I do and coffee doesn't effect him either way.

Fuck old age.

Starjots
11-16-2017, 10:03 PM
This thread was click bait for me. Probably because I'm "that age".

Back pain is just a part of life at this point. Something I learn to turn off as background noise.

Mind you, I don't have (as far as I know) any back issues that prevent me from lifting heavy things and such. I just wake up every morning in need of a God Damned warmup. Or, worse, wake up at 3AM... 5AM.. 6AM.. in need of a position change because my back is waking me up. My back hurts at some level 24/7. It doesn't matter what I've given my back to do, mind you. Whether he's bailing hay or watching TV he hurts the same amount. It's the time of day that matters. He's a night person. In the morning, Mr. Back takes longer to wake up than I do and coffee doesn't effect him either way.

Fuck old age.

Have you tried switching what you sleep on? This helped my mate a lot about 10 years ago and I've reaped some benefits as well. I could sleep on concrete floors at 18, no way I'm doing that again.

stigmatica
11-16-2017, 10:11 PM
Have you tried switching what you sleep on? This helped my mate a lot about 10 years ago and I've reaped some benefits as well. I could sleep on concrete floors at 18, no way I'm doing that again.
I have to wonder if I'd slept on less concrete if my back would be more tolerant today.

It's a spouse thing... I need concrete minus 100... my wife needs concrete minus 10000. So, we do concrete minus 5000. I refuse to be such a wimp as to spend 1000's of dollars on a mattress. I suppose it's just a thing with me. I refuse to get old or give in to oldness. If everyone else is sleeping on concrete, I can too damnit! I still like to think I'm tougher than that or something.

MoneyJungle
11-16-2017, 10:51 PM
Oh yeah. I'm giving my back five years before I can't work at my job anymore. I even took the drop handlebars off of my bike like an old geezer. It's my neck more than my back. I've tried nothing and am all out of options!

rokki balbotox
11-16-2017, 11:50 PM
i used to get bad sciatic nerve pain until i started sleeping on an air mattress

jigglypuff
11-17-2017, 12:04 AM
i get back pain cuz of my long work hours. i’m “too young” for it so it worries me but i also try to stretch and relax (baths and, rarely, massages) whenever i can. i also get other problems like my wrist is stiff but it’s not exactly carpal tunnel. i don’t know what the problem is cuz i only go to the doctor when i’m dying.

during my breaks i have been recovering quickly so i’m not too worried beyond the day to day dealing with discomfort.

it’s only bad bad when i get only like an hour of sleep or something... but i know what the problem is in that case.

Hephaestus
11-17-2017, 12:27 AM
I have to wonder if I'd slept on less concrete if my back would be more tolerant today.

It's a spouse thing... I need concrete minus 100... my wife needs concrete minus 10000. So, we do concrete minus 5000. I refuse to be such a wimp as to spend 1000's of dollars on a mattress. I suppose it's just a thing with me. I refuse to get old or give in to oldness. If everyone else is sleeping on concrete, I can too damnit! I still like to think I'm tougher than that or something.

Strong support seems to be much better than softness. If I sleep in soft fluffy bed, I'll wake up in terrible pain. I sleep on concrete and I may have a hard time getting to sleep, but I'll wake up with spots of discomfort on the contact patch, but my back will be fine. It's why I went to a shikibuton on the floor. By itself, it's just a little too little for comfort--left me feeling my ribs if you know what I mean. But on top of a thin area rug is pretty much perfect. Now if I could just find a good pillow that will stay put...

I'm thinking my ideal bed and pillow probably involves something like those stress balls filled with sand.

But with the option for heat in winter or if I'm feeling ill.

interprétation erronée
11-17-2017, 12:33 AM
that back though

Light Leak
11-17-2017, 01:09 AM
i get back pain cuz of my long work hours. i’m “too young” for it so it worries me but i also try to stretch and relax (baths and, rarely, massages) whenever i can. i also get other problems like my wrist is stiff but it’s not exactly carpal tunnel. i don’t know what the problem is cuz i only go to the doctor when i’m dying.

Do you work on a tablet? I also get pain in my hand and wrist I think from using a tablet frequently at work. It actually started up my whole arm for awhile. My physical therapist says it's the median nerve because it goes into my pointer and middle finger. There's exercises that I do for it that help. They are hard to describe, but I'm sure there's info online about them or similar exercises.

jigglypuff
11-17-2017, 01:42 AM
Do you work on a tablet? I also get pain in my hand and wrist I think from using a tablet frequently at work. It actually started up my whole arm for awhile. My physical therapist says it's the median nerve because it goes into my pointer and middle finger. There's exercises that I do for it that help. They are hard to describe, but I'm sure there's info online about them or similar exercises.

i prefer working on a tablet and that's what i've normally done, but for the past few months it's been almost entirely my laptop which is really terrible cuz it's a trackpad... so from holding my hand in a really stupid position (?) the thumb side of my hand and my wrist gets stiff. i don't know how to describe it either. i'd be interested in knowing the hand exercises though.

for the past two months, whenever i rotate my wrist, it cracks. i've been told to not crack it. tbh i don't really know if that presents any kind of long-term problem, but the way it sounds doesn't sound "normal." edit: i've been wearing a wrist guard though, and that stopped the cracking. idk why.

when working on a tablet i haven't experienced problems yet maybe cuz i'm working more efficiently on it, idk.

i have lots of issues with how i have to work right now, like i find myself unable to focus lately unless i'm outside on a laptop. it's stuff i gotta work out. :/

stuck
11-17-2017, 01:46 AM
My lower back saga:

My back issues have probably been creeping up on me for years. I thought I just had a "lateral asymmetry." Then one night after some long sessions I woke up with a terrible searing pain down my leg. It was severe enough that I had to go lay on the floor and take ibuprofen to fall asleep. Assuming I had just pulled something, I tried to ibuprofen it away for a couple weeks. Eventually I went to a PT, who told me that my whole sacral region was twisted. She suggested lots of core work and stretching, in addition to relearning how to walk. We still didn't know what was causing it, but the exercises made my pain a little better. Also, I switched desk chairs to a harder chair. Slowly my pain went from a constant 7-8 down to about a 4-5, with some flare ups. Success was initially measured by times I woke up in the middle of night, which eventually dropped to zero. Then, success became how many times I had to use ibuprofen and nerve drugs. "Lateral asymmetry" be the root cause of my issues, but it turns out that what I thought was a pulled glute, piriformis syndrome, or a bulging disk was actually levoscoliosis, meaning my spine bows slightly to the left. .

Simply getting a diagnosis made the pain drop significantly, because my brain finally understood why it was happening. I still do the same PT stuff, but put extra effort in making sure the weak/stretched side of my back and spine is getting more use than the other. The pain has dropped to a 1-3 with some flareups into a 5-6. I'm back in the gym and back to using ibuprofen only every few weeks. In the gym I make sure to do a proper warmup, program intuitively rather than trying to do sheiko or texas method like a psychopath, and make sure that I stretch and do core work every day.

Diagnosing the actual root issue of back pain is notoriously difficult.

Light Leak
11-17-2017, 05:06 AM
i prefer working on a tablet and that's what i've normally done, but for the past few months it's been almost entirely my laptop which is really terrible cuz it's a trackpad... so from holding my hand in a really stupid position (?) the thumb side of my hand and my wrist gets stiff. i don't know how to describe it either. i'd be interested in knowing the hand exercises though.

for the past two months, whenever i rotate my wrist, it cracks. i've been told to not crack it. tbh i don't really know if that presents any kind of long-term problem, but the way it sounds doesn't sound "normal." edit: i've been wearing a wrist guard though, and that stopped the cracking. idk why.

when working on a tablet i haven't experienced problems yet maybe cuz i'm working more efficiently on it, idk.

i have lots of issues with how i have to work right now, like i find myself unable to focus lately unless i'm outside on a laptop. it's stuff i gotta work out. :/

I don't know if the cracking is bad or not. The ball of my pointer finger cracks frequently when I open my hand all the way and that's also one of my fingers that hurts sometimes. I think my issue with the tablet is I got in the habit of using the stylus for everything and stopped using a mouse for awhile. I sit at a desk at work all day so my hand was basically in a writing position all day. I have since switched back to using a mouse when I'm doing things that I don't really need the stylus for to give my hand a break from being in the same position all day.

Anyway, here's an exercise similar to the one I was taught for my median nerve pain. I couldn't find the exact exercises I was taught. I just tried doing this one in the video and it seems to work the same way as the ones I was taught.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPG9ZCCxJ9U

The way I was taught my arm starts more down by my side and slightly behind me and I don't do the head turn thing. The hand / wrist position is the same. Then keeping my arm straight I raise it until it starts to hurt. Then wiggle my fingers to release some of the tension. Then start over and try to raise my arm higher the next time. I do it like 10-20 times depending on how bad it is.

Then I do other one where I stick my arm straight out in front of me with my wrist bent up and sort of push my shoulder forward a little. Then keeping the wrist bend up and arm straight I move my arm to the side (away from me not, across my chest). I do the same thing where I stop when it starts to hurt and wiggle the fingers and start over again trying to go further the next time.

I don't know know well it works on thumbs since my thumb doesn't hurt. I feel it mostly in my shoulder and the inside of my elbow while I'm doing the exercises and a little bit in my pointer and middle fingers (those are the ones that hurt on me). My hand does feel better after I do them though since the median nerve runs all the way down the arm.

oxyjen
11-17-2017, 05:11 AM
Been lucky enough so far not to have any recurring back pain.

However in the last few years, I'll have pain in the area in the base of my neck where it branches off into back/shoulders. Many times it correlates with days that are very busy with a lot of forced prolonged socializing. I obviously carry my tension there but I'm not sure what I'm doing or how to lessen it.

BillyBibbit
11-17-2017, 03:50 PM
do some stretching and/or yoga. fixed. you're welcome

jigglypuff
11-17-2017, 04:07 PM
I don't know if the cracking is bad or not. The ball of my pointer finger cracks frequently when I open my hand all the way and that's also one of my fingers that hurts sometimes. I think my issue with the tablet is I got in the habit of using the stylus for everything and stopped using a mouse for awhile. I sit at a desk at work all day so my hand was basically in a writing position all day. I have since switched back to using a mouse when I'm doing things that I don't really need the stylus for to give my hand a break from being in the same position all day.

Anyway, here's an exercise similar to the one I was taught for my median nerve pain. I couldn't find the exact exercises I was taught. I just tried doing this one in the video and it seems to work the same way as the ones I was taught.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPG9ZCCxJ9U

The way I was taught my arm starts more down by my side and slightly behind me and I don't do the head turn thing. The hand / wrist position is the same. Then keeping my arm straight I raise it until it starts to hurt. Then wiggle my fingers to release some of the tension. Then start over and try to raise my arm higher the next time. I do it like 10-20 times depending on how bad it is.

Then I do other one where I stick my arm straight out in front of me with my wrist bent up and sort of push my shoulder forward a little. Then keeping the wrist bend up and arm straight I move my arm to the side (away from me not, across my chest). I do the same thing where I stop when it starts to hurt and wiggle the fingers and start over again trying to go further the next time.

I don't know know well it works on thumbs since my thumb doesn't hurt. I feel it mostly in my shoulder and the inside of my elbow while I'm doing the exercises and a little bit in my pointer and middle fingers (those are the ones that hurt on me). My hand does feel better after I do them though since the median nerve runs all the way down the arm.
thanks :) i just tried this and it seems good to do regularly since it puts some tension on my upper arm where i do experience regular aching, and i didn't really know where that was coming from. i'll try to remember to stretch this way when it gets bad.

baccheion
11-17-2017, 04:34 PM
Anybody have them?

I get muscle pain in my back when I'm sitting down working for long hours. Drives me crazy.Describe the pain.


I don't know if the cracking is bad or not. The ball of my pointer finger cracks frequently when I open my hand all the way and that's also one of my fingers that hurts sometimes. I think my issue with the tablet is I got in the habit of using the stylus for everything and stopped using a mouse for awhile. I sit at a desk at work all day so my hand was basically in a writing position all day. I have since switched back to using a mouse when I'm doing things that I don't really need the stylus for to give my hand a break from being in the same position all day.

Anyway, here's an exercise similar to the one I was taught for my median nerve pain. I couldn't find the exact exercises I was taught. I just tried doing this one in the video and it seems to work the same way as the ones I was taught.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPG9ZCCxJ9U

The way I was taught my arm starts more down by my side and slightly behind me and I don't do the head turn thing. The hand / wrist position is the same. Then keeping my arm straight I raise it until it starts to hurt. Then wiggle my fingers to release some of the tension. Then start over and try to raise my arm higher the next time. I do it like 10-20 times depending on how bad it is.

Then I do other one where I stick my arm straight out in front of me with my wrist bent up and sort of push my shoulder forward a little. Then keeping the wrist bend up and arm straight I move my arm to the side (away from me not, across my chest). I do the same thing where I stop when it starts to hurt and wiggle the fingers and start over again trying to go further the next time.

I don't know know well it works on thumbs since my thumb doesn't hurt. I feel it mostly in my shoulder and the inside of my elbow while I'm doing the exercises and a little bit in my pointer and middle fingers (those are the ones that hurt on me). My hand does feel better after I do them though since the median nerve runs all the way down the arm.Cracking sometimes suggest insufficient vitamin D and/or calcium.

Vitamin K2 MK-4 is recommended when taking vitamin D (at least 100 micrograms : 1000 IU, with 200-400 micrograms or more being even better), as it directs calcium away from soft tissue and to where it's needed. Also, magnesium (or anything else that increases hyaluronic acid) tends to improve joint lubrication.


My lower back has been 'crinkly' since about age 50. It doesn't hurt yet, but I think a lot of the good stuff has worn away due to bad posture and rather long and heavy torso.

My upper back used to get quite tight due to stress and aforementioned reasons. An occasional massage and a few visits to a chiropracter did wonders for that.

It's not the back, but for stress release I massage my own head (joking aside) to move the scalp around.
You can look into silica (as monomethylsilanetriol or maybe bamboo extract powder), vitamin K2 MK-4 (at least 1.5 milligrams), magnesium, and MSM. And a good multivitamin (even Life Extension Two-Per-Day) to buffer against any introduced imbalances.

Vitamin D increases calcium absorption. Vitamin K2 MK-4 gives calcium "hooks" and proper direction. Silica, by triggering collagen synthesis, results in integration of calcium; and stronger bones, teeth, skin, hair, nails, joints, tendons, etc. Magnesium helps maintain bone/joint strength, hyaluronic acid production, and calcium absorption. MSM provides sulfur and is biased toward joints.

Silica! Silica! Silica! It may be the most profound supplement to increase bone/collagen health and reduce outward signs of aging.

Monomethylsilanetriol's high bioavailability (64%) results in silica buffers being replenished in ~3 months at 12mg/day, ~1.5 months at 24mg/day, or ~3 weeks at 24mg 2x/day. Increasing stores from 7 grams (typical) to 20 grams (preferred) can take 5-10 years at 12mg/day, as it relies on bone turnover.

Senseye
11-17-2017, 10:21 PM
I worked a desk job for 30 years (i.e. sitting) and don't have any chronic back pain issues. Heavy lifting or one of the banes of my existence (snow shoveling) can make my back stiff for a bit, but not painful.

Just to be a contrarian, I wonder if my terrible posture actually helps. I rarely sit straight. I often slouch forward, lean to the side (chin on hand, like the thinker), lean back with feet on desk and keyboard in lap, and other various sitting poses 100% not recommended by the posture nannies.

No standing desks or those weird ergonomic knee chairs or anything like that either. Just a basic low back desk chair with some tilt and swivel.