Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: How do you travel?

  1. #1
    <3 gator's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,462

    How do you travel?

    Short trips? Long trips?

    All inclusive? Off the beaten track?

    For fun, or only when you have to?

    R&R or lots of stimulation? What are your preferred activities?

    How do you think your introversion affects how you travel?

  2. #2
    libertine librarian sandwitch's Avatar
    Type
    intp
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    flyover territory
    Posts
    1,356
    I prefer long trips, with a mix of meeting new people/spending time with friends and independent movement. I've found that I really enjoy the hostel atmosphere, as it allows me to associate with people without much commitment. Hostels that go off the beaten track generally have the most interesting people. I like to try new food, libraries and museums, cafes, and long walks on the beach.

    I don't do much solo travel into the wilderness, which is probably for the best, but it does have appeal. I think it'd be nice to wilderness backpack with another introvert, who is also more rugged with strong survival skills. Maybe a meditation/spiritual advisor, or something like that.

    Introversion often gets me lost, because I shun tour guides (both formal and informal) and will often separate from groups. I will also tire faster than other travelers, and need to schedule private reflection time or I am quickly disenchanted by my new environment. I've found journaling extremely helpful.

  3. #3
    Senior Member skip's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Tatooine
    Posts
    1,309
    I love, love, love travel for any reason: business, pleasure, exploration, religious. I love how every day is different, there's little routine and so much new to learn. It's such a big planet and we're on it for such a short time. I could live out of a suitcase for the rest of my life and enjoy it.

    If it's a place new to me I typically prefer to experience it alone. There are fewer distractions and I can absorb and process more than if I'm with others. If it's a place I'm very familiar with I like to bring other people and sometimes even act as a tour guide. Otherwise I don't like to travel in groups and any kind of planned or all-inclusive thing is repulsive to me.

    Hiking I usually do for months at a time and alone, mainly because I hike slowly and like to stop when I want or need to. I use that time to pray and meditate and I prefer to be by myself because I can concentrate better.

    I don't like the kind of travel where you hit twelve cities in twelve days or something similar. I'd rather live in one place, even if it's just for a month, as a local, than just zip through it. I get intrigued by things and then frustrated if I can't explore them more deeply.
    Yes, I smell like a horse. No, I don't consider that a problem.

  4. #4
    I don't usually have that much vacation time, but I live abroad when I can. I've never done all-inclusive. I have mixed feelings about it, really. It sounds luxurious, but I also get really restless.

    Especially now, partly because of my current living situation and partly because I have zero desire to fly across the world for a beach that's about the same as another one much closer, I mostly travel to be with friends. To see them, and also to wander around and see their lives and cities. I am a horrible planner for vacations (why would I schedule my vacation time?!) and will just wander the streets if allowed (I have ended up some random and interesting places this way). I also have zero tourist instinct--tourist groups and sites usually bore or anger me, and I have no desire to do the marathon "highlights" tours that many people do (GAH!). I am so much more interested to poke around and watch people, and I think you naturally meet interesting or interested people if you're curious. I often feel refreshed just wandering, though having a friend who will take me somewhere or play tour guide can be lovely--I have done some of my best tourist-ness this way.

    I'm usually trying to experience delicious foods (special fondness for street food here), hit up museums, soak up any art/music, and do my best to absorb the place. I love open-air markets, random shops and boutiques. I can "rough it," but I don't travel to be in wilderness--I would much rather travel through wilderness to get to interesting people. I also appreciate being able to speak the language (or travel with someone who does, though this can be a burden), or communicate on a non-sign-language level.
    Last edited by MuseedesBeauxArts; 05-11-2014 at 06:29 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member skip's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Tatooine
    Posts
    1,309
    I forgot about the food! That's a major motivator for travel for me: food, along with interesting clothing and landscapes.
    Yes, I smell like a horse. No, I don't consider that a problem.

  6. #6
    Sysop Ptah's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    5,169
    Honestly, if it weren't for Sekhmet wanting to travel, I'd probably never do it.

    By and large, I'm just along for the ride as she wants to travel.

    Every now and again I'm interested in touring the scenery of a particular place (art, architecture, whatever), but it is usually fairly abstract and rarely has any actual influence on our travel plans, nor becomes a particular impetus for me to travel otherwise.

    Otherwise, we travel wherever she wants to go, on the understanding that I'll be able to just find a place to be absorbed in myself and be left more or less alone (exception: being with her). The place we go is really just ... there, as a backdrop, in my mind. Not to say I haven't enjoyed travelling to different places with Sekhmet, but the truth is I can (and in, fact prefer to) relax, self-absorbed in the comfort of my own home (that is the definition of a vacation to me). What time we spend together on dinners and outings can be done faster, easier and more comfortably around home, in my view. Vacations/travel is just a bunch of logistical headache... unnecessarily so. That is, the enjoyment of "getting out" to see the world does not overcome the hassle of travel itself, in my motivation system. I don't know if it is my influence or just her preference, or both, but we tend to do planned tours and all-inclusives, etc. I'm fine with that, sense it mitigates the unknown factor.

    Food can be a serious problem for me. I never thought of myself as being a picky eater, but travelling has shown me that I basically am. There have been trips where I pack bags of trail mix to sustain me for the week. I refuse to eat seafood, so that's a common problem. I distrust and dislike trying new foods. I'll simply not eat, if that's what it means. (I tend not to eat much when stressed anyhow)

    Culture shock is another serious problem for me. I'm constantly shutting down and turning inward, just "fast forwarding" (that is, interactively disengage and retreat inward) through events until I can get back to quiet, to-myself space. I'm crushed under a sense that I don't belong, I have no purpose here.

  7. #7
    Member Mxx's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    3,590
    I would love to be able to travel for extended periods of time, but the realities and expectations at work are serious constraints. (It's one of the reasons I look forward to moving back to Europe - being able to take time off work guilt-free). As a teenager, my dream was to move country every few years - exploring the country by living there.

    I'm fond of vacation rentals - unique places to stay without the soulless, matchbox feel of a hotel, and a lot more privacy. I usually do a lot of research of the areas where I'll be visiting - that way I have a menu of options to pick from when I'm there depending on my mood. Most of the time, long walks in nature are the highlight for me. Or a fantastic encounter with a stranger.

    I have mostly traveled alone - and that is my preference.

  8. #8
    Member
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    gone
    Posts
    920
    We travel a lot. I'll go anywhere anytime. I love everything about it, even the petty annoyances, which are interesting and can be different in different places. Once the packing is done (I hate packing!), traveling is the freest I ever feel in life. We were supposed to go to Russia next week under Government auspices but, not surprisingly, this trip was canceled (or, hopefully, only postponed).

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    3,252
    What is going to make me happy in terms of travel depends on why I'm there. I always enjoyed traveling for work because they would put me up in a fairly nice hotel and I could go try the best restaurants in town and expense my meal. I could spend my free time in the gym or the pool, or just wandering around town if it was worth exploring. I think getting some peace and quiet is the most important thing when I'm traveling. Either I need to have a nice clean, quiet hotel room to retreat to, or a campsite in a quiet campground or a wilderness campsite (which is going to obviously be quiet so long as no extroverts show up and decide to set up camp right next to us) are both also acceptable. The first time rhinosaur took me camping it was at a campground in a state park and it was fucking miserable. Those are the kinds of places where people with too many kids go because they can't afford to take them anywhere nice but want them to stop destroying the house for a week, and there were kids yelling and screaming and running around from 6am until after dark. And then they'd have to get up in the middle of the night and go to the bathroom, and be yelling the whole way there too. The grown ups were no treat either -- a lot of people just sitting around drinking beer and blasting shitty music all day. But I enjoyed camping in Alaska and in the Grand Canyon, even though both of those were campgrounds. You just didn't see as many kids, or people with giant coolers of beer and a boom box making a lot of noise.

    All other things being equal, I prefer a nice hotel with lots of amenities over a budget hotel, but it's only worth the money if I'm going to be spending a lot of time in the hotel. If I'm traveling for fun on my own money, I'm usually going somewhere to do something, so I'll skimp on the hotel to have more money for activities. As long as a place is clean and I can shut the door and be alone (rhinosaur doesn't count), I'm good. No dorm rooms or hostels for me. I don't travel to socialize. I mean, I don't avoid socializing, but I need my alone time. I've also stayed in places that were not as clean as I would have liked, but I was there for other activities so it wasn't that big of a deal. Basically, if something else is going to be the highlight of my trip then lodging isn't that important. If it's an R+R, lay by the pool type of trip then a shitty hotel is going to ruin my vacation. I don't really do lay by the pool vacations by choice though. Those are usually family trips that I just go along with.

    As far as where I go, I'm not really into city vacations. I have no interest in going to Paris or London because those just seem like another city, and I'd just end up going to museums and cafes and restaurants and shit, and that's all stuff I can do here, and it's kind of getting old. I like going to the Caribbean and Central America because I can do and see things that you just don't get in Massachusetts. I also like the warm weather. I prefer active vacations over sightseeing or laying on the beach. I am not into food, and usually get tired of eating in restaurants. I avoid all inclusives because I don't drink that much and I'm not going to eat most of what's on offer, so it's a rip off. I cook pretty healthy, and I don't eat meat, so food is often a problem when I travel. In most of the developed world I can manage eating out every day, but when I go to poor places, my choices are usually so limited that lodging with a kitchen is almost a necessity if I'm staying for more than a couple days. I cannot live on nachos and cheese quesadillas and veggie burgers. You'd be amazed at how unhealthy the vegetarian choices can be, both in tourist and non-tourist areas, in much of the world. Even crappier parts of the US are a problem in this respect.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •