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Thread: The Pearson Archetypal System

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    The Pearson Archetypal System

    Note: moved from MBTI & Typology; my error...

    Now this isn't MBTI(*), and I'm not normally(**) one to entertain such seemingly "out there" archetypal pseudoscience things, but I have to admit that I was entertained and to a degree fascinated by what would be my first encounter with this "system", the book:



    ... and lately I found the author has a whole website thing going here:

    http://www.herowithin.com/system/

    Anyone else familiar with this book or this "system"? Thoughts?


    To greatly summarize my thoughts on it, I'd say once you strip off all the gushy fluff (and increasingly feminist slant) of the author's writing style, it has some merit underneath it all? Of the sort that I take MBTI/etc to have: descriptive, not prescriptive within a certain established context/angle of viewing a person or society?

    (*although it may be considered a sort of "typology" if you stretch the term...)
    (** Tarot is an very specific, conditioned, strange exception)

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    Making a note to return to this thread, as I did find some value in this book, once I got past the violent gag-reflexes caused by her writing style and the stink of new-age spiritualism.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mxx View Post
    ...once I got past the violent gag-reflexes caused by her writing style and the stink of new-age spiritualism.
    Yeah, exactly. Once I managed to push past that (and it took me a few tries over a few months), I could tune into the signal over the noise, which seemed to have at least some plausible insight if not merit.

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    Member Mxx's Avatar
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    The Archetype that resonated most with me was that of the Sage: "Both Rulers and Magicians want to control reality and to change negative circumstances into positive ones. Sages have little or no need to control or change the world; they just want to understand it."

    Even more familiar to me were descriptions of the Negative Sage: "When we are caught in the shadow side of the Sage, we are not so much unattached as cut off from reality. Things happening around us or even within us feel like they are miles away. We can register what is happening, but we have no feelings about it. We feel pretty numb. We are obsessed by nonattachment, so cannot commit to people, projects, or ideas. Sometimes we delude ourselves that this provides us with freedom, but we are not really free at all. We are simply too terrified of commitment to really attach to anyone or anything."

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    I'll post something more detailed when I get a chance to refer back to the material and kick up some memories, but for now...

    The book was very ho-hum for me to begin reading. That, and throughout, I rather detested many of the upshots she was making for otherwise pretty decent, archetypal observations about people/society. For instance, the premise that everyone is "wounded" from the get-go (Innocent, Orphan):

    ... but (after the third or fourth time over a year trying to push this book through my rejection filters), things really caught my attention when I got to the Seeker, kept pushing, then to the Creator and Magician. There, once I kicked all her b.s. upshots and whys aside, I could start to find things I strongly identify with -- where her archetypes began to make some sort of coherent whole of sense.

    Generally, the system could be fixed -- its merit uncovered -- if it shed all her seemingly-projection-based nonsense of how (pseudopsychologically-speaking) archetypes come to be and where they tend to go (and what ultimate purpose they serve) in people. Again, for instance, most of her "higher" archetypes necessitate some sort of eusocial, sacrificial, altruistic-communistic nonsense to be "highly developed". Over and over stating when not implying that to be "whole" you must "be a part of/give to the community". Again:

    As with many systems of this sort, she'd do well to drop the prescriptive and stick to the descriptive. Basically, ditch all the would-be self-help and world-bettering fluff in the book, and you're left with something pretty decent.

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    I agree - the book almost begs a rewrite, stripping all the new-age spiritual and prescriptive crap, focusing in on the archetypes, and connecting them with others system (like the Tarot, MBTI, etc.).

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    Yeah, I'd started a correspondence model between some of her archetypes and the MBTI, the Tarot. Maybe I'll dig it up and post it for kicks.

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    This is fun, if only because I love the magician archetype being actually called 'magician'.

    yer a wizard arry
    Empty your mind. Be formless. Shapeless. Like water. Water can flow, or it can crash. Be water, my friend.

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