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Thread: Unconditional Quantum Teleportation “Spooky action at a distance.” ~A. Einstein

  1. #1
    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Unconditional Quantum Teleportation “Spooky action at a distance.” ~A. Einstein

    Researchers have taken a huge step towards slamming the door shut on one of Einstein's remaining issues with quantum theory.

    http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...port.html?_r=1

    ENTANGLEMENT

    Researchers use laser light to “entangle” two electrons trapped inside small synthetic diamonds. A change made to one electron will instantaneously affect the other electron, even if it is far away.

    Reading the quantum state change would allow you to exchange digital information.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/30/sc...port-data.html

    But reliability of quantum teleportation has been elusive. For example, in 2009, University of Maryland physicists demonstrated the transfer of quantum information, but only one of every 100 million attempts succeeded, meaning that transferring a single bit of quantum information required roughly 10 minutes.


    In contrast, the scientists at Delft have achieved the ability “deterministically,” meaning they can now teleport the quantum state of two entangled electrons accurately 100 percent of the time.
    The Research paper:

    Unconditional quantum teleportation between distant solid-state qubits

    Realizing robust quantum information transfer between long-lived qubit registers is a key challenge

    for quantum information science and technology. Here we demonstrate unconditional teleportation
    of arbitrary quantum states between diamond spin qubits separated by 3 meters. We prepare the

    teleporter through photon-mediated heralded entanglement between two distant electron spins and
    subsequently encode the source qubit in a single nuclear spin. By realizing a fully deterministic
    Bell-state measurement combined with real-time feed-forward we achieve teleportation in each at-
    tempt while obtaining an average state delity exceeding the classical limit. These results establish
    diamond spin qubits as a prime candidate for the realization of quantum networks for quantum
    communication and network-based quantum computing.
    Additional Info:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_teleportation
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retrocausality


    I'm greatly baffled by quantum physics and would be interested in hearing opinions from those with a better understanding.

    Also, what sorts of application can you imagine for this possible new technology?

    IF you truly can communicate over vast distances, without regard for the speed of light, then paired transmitters and receivers could allow us to more boldly and deftly use our robotic probes to explore the outer solar system and beyond.

    A entangled T/R equipped probe in tight Solar orbit would give us an 8 minute heads-up about eruptions on the sun.

  2. #2
    Pull the strings! Architect's Avatar
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    They're mixing up some things, reporters never get it right. One is that there's no teleportation, whatever that means. Most people think Star Trek.

    Second, who cares what Einstein thought? He clearly was wrong with QM even though he practically birthed the field with his Photoelectric Effect. But he was firmly classical (which is reflected in the General and Special theories) so no news there.

    Three, entanglement has been long established, nothing new there, the EPR thought experiment (Einstein Poldasky Rosen) which attempted to disprove entanglement has been discredited for many years. Quantum computers fight entanglement on a daily basis, it's just engineering now. Again no news.

    So what is new here? Well maybe that they can reliably determine (pick) the spin of the captured electron (the transmitter if you like). The problem is that you can't communicate between the entangled electrons because you can't deterministically set the spin of the one you've got. It's just in some superposition state, and you have to test where it is, which "instantly" (English doesn't help here) determines what the spin of the other is. But you can't give it a spin, which is necessary for communication between the two. It does say

    The researchers were able to establish a spin, or value, for electrons, and then read the value reliably.
    but that could mean anything.

    So there's not enough to even know if this experiment means anything, the article is so poorly written I don't know what they actually discovered, if anything.

    I could dig up the paper but I don't care that much to find out.

    Edit: Oh you had it linked up there. OK ... don't know, the paper looks slightly suspicious (one of my friends in Physics grad school went to Delft, so I know it's a good school at least). There's little math and a lot of pictures, maybe I'll check it out some other time.

    Edit^2: Argggggg ... OK I scanned it. I see, they're using "teleportation" in a specific sense, which is that they think they can teleport the quantum state via photons (e.g. laser) between separated electrons. Normally you have to create teleported pairs and then physically separate them. Further they think that using these lasers is better than classical usage (e.g. ordinary optical communication). That's fine, but physically you still need the optical link to transport that state, so it doesn't seem fantastically different than what we have now.
    Last edited by Architect; 05-31-2014 at 08:28 PM.

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    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    Here is a Graphic from the paper.

    They call the two entangled Quabits Alice & Bob (A,B)



    It appears to me that they are manipulating the state of one and reading the change with the other.

    The question I have is:

    Would this T-R entanglement endure as the pair are separated across vast distance?

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    Pull the strings! Architect's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrionzRevenge View Post
    It appears to me that they are manipulating the state of one and reading the change with the other.
    Sure but what is the mechanism? I think it's that the state is still being transmitted (transported in their language) via a photon stream. That's not classical entanglement, and again classical state transmission via optical isn't new. The interesting thing would be that they can induce entanglement via photos but they gloss over that it seems.

    Would this T-R entanglement endure as the pair are separated across vast distance?

    Entanglement doesn't depend on space-time so yes. Take two entangled electrons, put one in Andromeda, test the state of this one, you know for certain what the state of the other is.

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    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    The take that PysOrg is espousing is that the claim worth noting is 100% reliability of the conventionally understood meaning of 'Entanglement'.

    I recall from previous threads, at the old world, that you are well-versed in these matters. So I appreciate your apprehension at the potential ambiguity.

    http://phys.org/news/2014-05-team-ac...antum-ten.html

    (Phys.org) —A team of researchers at Delft University in the Netherlands is reporting in a paper they have had published in the journal Science, that they have successfully used entanglement as a means of communication, over a distance of ten feet (three meters). Furthermore, they note, they did so with 100 percent reliability and without altering the spin state of the quantum bits (qubits) involved.

    Teleportation, is of course, a means of moving an object from one place to another without it having to travel between them. Thus far examples of it have only been seen in science fiction movies. The idea of moving information in similar fashion, however, has met with some, albeit limited success. The idea is to use the concept of entanglement of particles as a means of conveyance. It's supposed to work because of the strange interconnectedness of the two particles—whatever happens to one, automatically happens to the other, regardless of the distance between them. Such a property should allow then, for the exchange of information. If the spin state of one qubit is altered, then it should be automatically altered in the other qubit—a form of information exchange which can be counted as a message of sorts if a string of such transactions can be carried out.

    To date, scientists have struggled to use entanglement as a means of communication—it's been achieved but the error rate has been so great that it would be unfeasible as a real-world application. In this new effort, the researchers claim to have solved the error rate problem—they've brought it down to zero percent. They did it, they report, by trapping electrons in diamonds at very low temperatures and shooting them with lasers, resulting in the creation of qubits. The diamonds, the team reports, serve as really tiny prisons, holding the electrons in place. Held as they were, the researchers were able to cause a spin state to exist and then to read it at both locations, which meant that information had been conveyed.

    The research team next plans to extend the distance between the qubits to 1,300 meters, while others presumably will attempt to replicate the first result—if the claims prove true, the breakthrough could mark the first stage of a the development of a true quantum computer, or network.


    In this video, Hanson explains in layman's terms the process starting at the 2:05 mark.

    Apparently, the term 'teleportation' is being used in reference to the Bell State of a third particle being first imposed upon one of the entangled pair of diamond entrapped electrons before being instantly transferred to the second.

    My understanding is that the entangled particles only allows you to communicate information once.

    So, it appears that, if you wanted to communicate worthwhile information, you'll need billions of entangled pairs as an expendable medium.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by OrionzRevenge View Post
    My understanding is that the entangled particles only allows you to communicate information once.

    So, it appears that, if you wanted to communicate worthwhile information, you'll need billions of entangled pairs as an expendable medium.
    Let me give you a concept. Though apart from each other, every electron in the universe is the same, a proof that the universe is a living paradox. I think this is what you meant by entanglement or whatever that is. Everything is already connected and the same one point but because a paradox is like an expanded form of a single point, there is "difference". While there is difference, all the values of these differences when added together is exactly the value of that single point, this is why you can have multiplicity as large as you want as they will all indicate the same exact value all the time. If you're trying to access these connections between differences, you have to consider that these are, by all means, already stable and no other thing could ever infiltrate. If we're just going to treat the distinct one identity-ness of all electrons in the use for such things... like 'teleportation', then we are already forgetting about stability and how the universe already is a stable paradox. Well I think if you want such things to happen, we just have to play with stability because that's what the universe is about, reaching a certain value of a single point (idk zero or something?). Well if you want a solid communication or connection (not just something that happens once) you can try subtracting something from... an electron maybe? and then adding something to another while preventing them to be stable... it just seems impossible. you can't even destroy electrons. 〜( ̄ω ̄〜)

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