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Thread: Historical Fragments

  1. #11
    The Pompatus of Love C.J.Woolf's Avatar
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    I knew about John Walker's spying and I knew about the seizure of USS Pueblo, but it never occurred to me that the two were connected. Thanks.

    Historical trivia: The US Navy keeps the Pueblo in commission despite the fact that she is now a tourist attraction in Pyongyang. That makes her the second-oldest commissioned ship in the Navy, after USS Constitution.
    Your gardening sucks and your avocados ain't fruitin'. -- Sappho the Maestro

  2. #12
    Mens bona regnum possidet ferrus's Avatar
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    Die Logik ist keine Lehre, sondern ein Spiegelbild der Welt. Die Logik ist transcendental. - Wittgenstein

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    libertine librarian sandwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferrus View Post
    Not as cute, but in many Islamic manuscripts there are inscriptions for "kabikaj," the king of the cockroaches.

    In Arabic and other eastern societies, sometimes a traditional method to protect books and scrolls was a metaphysical appeal to "Kabi:Kaj," the "King of the Cockroaches." By appealing to the king to protect a manuscript, cockroaches of less nobility (or lesser insects) would refrain from intruding on documents which could be eaten by the king only. Since many manuscripts were made with fish-glue, starch-paste, leather and other tasty substances, insect appetites were a constant and never ending problem to Arabic books and scrolls. A similar technique from Syria was to name the first and last page of a document or manuscript "The Page of the King of the Cockroaches", in the hope that the Cockroach King will control all other insects. Translated appeals include "O Kabi:kaj, save the paper!", "O Kabi:kaj, save this book from the worms!" and "O Kabi:kaj, do not eat this paper!" "In Maghribi manuscripts, the word appears in its evidently corrupt form, "Kaykataj" and is clearly used as a talisman... and mentions, after a certain Muhammad al-Samiri, that when one writes "Kaytataj" on the first and last folio of the book, one can be sure that worms will not attack it."
    Source: Wikipedia

  4. #14
    Mens bona regnum possidet ferrus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by C.J.Woolf View Post
    I knew about John Walker's spying and I knew about the seizure of USS Pueblo, but it never occurred to me that the two were connected. Thanks.
    Talking about spying, there is a evidence recently released that Japan's successes in the early part of WW2 in Asia against British and American forces - particularly the use of air craft carries (at Pearl Harbour, Singapore, Phillipines) were aided by possible espionage and technological transfers given by a Scottish laird.
    Die Logik ist keine Lehre, sondern ein Spiegelbild der Welt. Die Logik ist transcendental. - Wittgenstein

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    Ran Out of Crackerz Catoptric's Avatar
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    America was a Penal Colony before the revolution from which point they decided to send the majority over to Australia. I get the impression it was mostly people that were sent to the southern United States. . . Also this was a time when many slaves had been white or Native American.

    The survivors of the Battle of Culloden, as well as the result of Highland Clearances. Mostly Scottish. Then the Irish and Europeans came a century later.

    Elizabeth Canning English maidservant who claimed to have been kidnapped and held against her will in a hayloft for almost a month.

  6. #16
    Member MacGuffin's Avatar
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    On today's date in 1881, Andrew Watson became the first black footballer to play the game at the international level.

    He was captain of Scotland, they defeated England 6-1.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Starjots's Avatar
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    In 1901 the first big gusher at the Spindletop salt dome formation started the Texas oil boom. It was the most productive oil field in the world up to that point and made the US the world's leading oil producer. Most of the production was in the early years, but by 1985 the Spindletop oilfield had produced 153,000,000 barrels of oil.

    That's a little less than two days of world oil production and consumption today.


  8. #18
    Ran Out of Crackerz Catoptric's Avatar
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  9. #19
    Mens bona regnum possidet ferrus's Avatar
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    Die Logik ist keine Lehre, sondern ein Spiegelbild der Welt. Die Logik ist transcendental. - Wittgenstein

  10. #20
    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    This is a historic trio I've spent a little time learning about and whereas I'm mostly in concord with the authors historical account of events, I'm not willing to climb in bed with regard to his estimation of the psychological impact the crossing of paths would have carved so deeply into the soul of Leonardo da Vinci. Such as to paint its shadow on the canvas of history.


    Notes in contention:
    The present somewhat podgy-faced beauty which hangs in the Louvre is now known to be a travesty of the original. Over centuries the surface of the lighter pigments of her face have developed many tiny fissures, thus broadening and rounding her cheeks, while the darker pigments which depict her more definite features have lesser fissures and have thus retained a much closer approximation to their original form. This continuous retouching of the Mona Lisa was a symptom of a psychological trait in Leonardo, which became much more accentuated after his service with Borgia.
    ...
    Leonardo’s tendency to leave works unfinished and to flit from one subject to another in his notebooks, his inability to order this work into separate topics, or execute any overall extensive plan, all these minor traits became exaggerated to almost pathological proportions after his work with Borgia.
    ...
    But this horrific event would have its effect nonetheless – almost at once it would accentuate what might be termed his ‘intellectual stutter’. The meticulous details of his observations would lose any semblance of overall fluency as the intensity of his mind darted from one idea to another. It was at this time that he attempted to explain this curious mental tic (to himself?) by writing beside a diagram in his notebook that he would not complete this project because of ‘the evil nature of man’.
    I think the best way to illustrate the over-reach is to first assert my opinion that Leonardo was a very INTPisih sort.

    Where it is certainly true that Borgia was the worst despot one could imagine, it was a time & place where despots were a dime a dozen.
    True also, when shit got all Godfather like and Borgia settled old scores, it was shit in your paints time. But as the blood was being mopped away, Leonardo was speeding away for new adventures.

    LdV had spent 2 decades at the court of Sforza in Milan (A man that came to power by killing his young nephew, the rightful Duke by birth) prior to his encounter with Borgia... And Sforza was no pussy-cat.

    Leonardo always dabbled in his mind's fancy at the whim and nothing about being party to Borgia Butchery changed that one iota. IMO.

    Leonardo was also a complicated creature with tsunamis of cognitive dissonance flowing from his animated quill. He was passionately a humanist celebrating the body electric and deeming humanity God's ultimate wonder, and too, an often disgusted misanthropist.

    ‘the evil nature of man’ quote is taken from a typically rambling account of Leonardo when contemplating putting his notebooks in order for publication.

    He may have been speaking about a concept for a submarine, but most likely a Diving suite and hand-operated 'cork-screw remover' type devices to pry planks from the bottoms of ships in a harbor.

    How by the aid of a machine many may remain for some time under water.
    And how and why I do not describe my method of remaining under water
    and of living long without food; and I do not publish nor divulge these
    things by reason of the evil nature of man, who would use them for
    assassinations at the bottom of the sea and to destroy and sink ships,
    together with the men on board of them; and notwithstanding I will
    teach other things which are not dangerous.
    ~ LdV

    This was technology he tried to peddle to Venice during their epic struggle for control of Oriental Trade with the Ottoman Turks.

    BUT, he also what in his notebooks a dictated fantasy where he is an acclaimed and well-rewarded hero for bringing the Turks to their knees.

    Most importantly I think, LdV was about as much a painter as any INTP would wanna be pigeon-holed and limited in learning/exploring paths.

    This gripes me greatly when I always read/hear that he was to pathetically ADHD to focus his gift for slapping pigments on walls and shit for some rich clients.

    Leonardo was ALWAYS about learning how to paint super-ultra-realistic, and he never gave a rats-ass about doing, but knowing how to do it.

    Sound familiar?

    This is why he never kept his commitment to provide The Mona Lisa to the client.
    This is why he applied manifold thin washes of pigment to her face to perfectly emulate skin.

    /2 cents

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