Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28

Thread: The Massive Post-Apocalypse Tome for Technologies Reboot

  1. #1
    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
    Type
    INtP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Shambala Road
    Posts
    3,074

    Lightbulb The Massive Post-Apocalypse Tome for Technologies Reboot

    Stiggy's Thread about Low-T evolution got me thinking about just how fragile our Hi-tech civilization is.

    In Euro-centric thinking, the fall of Rome and the loss of the associated technologies lead to what is known as the Dark-Ages. It was the restoration of this lost information, with the flight from Muslim conquered Constantinople, that spurred the Renascence and what has been called the beginning of the modern era.

    Our situation is much more precarious because our technologies have advanced to a high degree of specialization and vastly dispersed centers of fabrication.

    In short, if our society were to suffer a collapse, we'd be fucked.

    So the question is: What sorts of survival material would need to be collected into a physical book form in order to reboot civilization?

    The links I've provided in my cursory listing are, for the most part, useless for the DIY situation we'd find ourselves in, but it might help spur some insight of point to a glaring area of oversight in my listing.

    What else needs be added to the list?
    Are there any fragments of our current technologies we can perpetuate unimpeded?
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Reading & Math Primers for kids

    Herbal Medicine

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbalism

    Fire
    http://www.instructables.com/id/7-Me...Fire-Starting/

    Knapping
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knapping

    Hand spinning
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hand_spinning

    Weaving
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weaving

    Domestication
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domestication

    Agriculture
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_agriculture

    Edible plants
    http://www.amazon.com/Field-Guide-Ed.../dp/039592622X

    Beer-wine Fermentation
    http://morebeer.com/brewingtechnique...hitchcock.html

    Cheese
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_cheese

    Food Preservation Methods
    http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-...z70ndzgoe.aspx

    Beekeeping
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beekeeping

    Trapping
    http://www.outdoorlife.com/photos/ga...survival-traps

    Fishing Technology
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fishing_techniques

    ANCIENT TANNING METHODS
    http://www.onagocag.com/tann.html

    PREHISTORIC POTTERY
    http://www.pottedhistory.co.uk/Prehistoric_Pottery.html

    Smelting -Tin and lead-Copper and bronze-Iron
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smelting

    Smithing

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blacksmith

    Lye Soap
    http://www.motherearthnews.com/homes...-lye-soap.aspx

    Quick Lime ~Calcium Oxide
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calcium_oxide

    Roman Concrete
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_concrete

    Stonemasonry
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonemasonry

    Gunpowder and Explosives
    http://cavemanchemistry.com/oldcave/projects/gunpowder/

    Woodwright
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Woodwright%27s_Shop

    Simple Machine Principles
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simple_machine

    Wind Power
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windmill

    Water Power
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watermill

    Archimedes' Screw _Water Pumps
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archimedes%27_screw

    Glass making
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_glass

    Paper
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papermaking

    Physics & Chemistry Primers

    Nature Lore (Avoiding hazards and finding resources)
    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

  2. #2
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
    Type
    eNTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Ceti Alpha V
    Posts
    15,250
    I also anticipate a coming infopocalypse. The irony is, we have people trying to preserve knowledge by digitizing it. I see that as more of a dissemination technique than a preservation technique. When the bottom falls out of our ability to keep such tech running, that shit is going to be just as lost as the scrolls turned to ashes in Alexandria.

    We could run across a data cache a million years old but there's no way of knowing we'd be able to recognize it as such.

    Which leads me to the glaring oversight in your data: reading primers. Having a book filled with wondrous knowledge is only slightly less useless than 128gb cache of knowledge you don't have the tech to extract or identify.

    I'd also add coopersmithing (some might say it falls under woodwright, but I don't think it's a little too specialized). I'd also include orienteering and sailing skills to the mix--so netmaking and knots and other nautical bits.

    The last thing I observe that I think is lacking is cooking and nutrition. You might think it implied in some of the others, but a person who doesn't know about vitamin C or goiters isn't going to realize they need citrus and iodine in their diet. Likewise without knowledge of the need for B vitamins, beri-beri could make a comeback. Our industrial food system does a pretty good job of making those passive concerns, leaving us with diabetes and heart disease instead of scurvy and goiters, but post collapse, that infra-structure would fall--as you seem to anticipate with the foraging and agriculture related topics.
    I'm suspicious of people who say they'll die for a flag but won't wear a mask for their neighbor.

  3. #3
    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
    Type
    INtP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Shambala Road
    Posts
    3,074
    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    I also anticipate a coming infopocalypse. The irony is, we have people trying to preserve knowledge by digitizing it. I see that as more of a dissemination technique than a preservation technique. When the bottom falls out of our ability to keep such tech running, that shit is going to be just as lost as the scrolls turned to ashes in Alexandria.

    We could run across a data cache a million years old but there's no way of knowing we'd be able to recognize it as such.

    Which leads me to the glaring oversight in your data: reading primers. Having a book filled with wondrous knowledge is only slightly less useless than 128gb cache of knowledge you don't have the tech to extract or identify.

    I'd also add coopersmithing (some might say it falls under woodwright, but I don't think it's a little too specialized). I'd also include orienteering and sailing skills to the mix--so netmaking and knots and other nautical bits.

    The last thing I observe that I think is lacking is cooking and nutrition. You might think it implied in some of the others, but a person who doesn't know about vitamin C or goiters isn't going to realize they need citrus and iodine in their diet. Likewise without knowledge of the need for B vitamins, beri-beri could make a comeback. Our industrial food system does a pretty good job of making those passive concerns, leaving us with diabetes and heart disease instead of scurvy and goiters, but post collapse, that infra-structure would fall--as you seem to anticipate with the foraging and agriculture related topics.
    Good points, we don't know where in time or situation we'll find the discoverers of the Tome. It would have to start with the education primers and the DIY sections would have to rely heavily on illustrations and simple language.

    This has an overall Humanitarian appeal to it and I'm not a survivalist zealot. When I see shows about bunker hoarders I think it useless unless you have massive amounts of money to invest.

    But in near-future terms, you could make yourself the indispensable wizard of a recovering community if you possessed vital knowledge.

    Mother Earth News has been doing the leg-work for these sorts of DIY from complete scratch technologies for decades now, and the military has invested a lot of trial & error into their survival manuals.

    Example: Saltpetre for Gunpowder. You can extract it from human & animal waste collection pits, but you have to know how to do it. Books Like Improvised Munitions Black Book gives line drawing illustrations and brief text explanations for doing such.

    This, I imagine, would be the basic format of such a tome.
    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

  4. #4
    Ieilaelite pensive_pilgrim's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    5,942
    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    I also anticipate a coming infopocalypse. The irony is, we have people trying to preserve knowledge by digitizing it. I see that as more of a dissemination technique than a preservation technique. When the bottom falls out of our ability to keep such tech running, that shit is going to be just as lost as the scrolls turned to ashes in Alexandria.
    Disseminating data is the best way to preserve them, though. The more copies there are, the less likely it will be lost. I don't see how we're just going to lose the ability to read magnetic hard drives and tapes, either. It's really simple to operate a computer and doesn't require huge amounts of infrastructure - hell, I could probably fill up a kindle with all that stuff and power it with a lemon, assuming I had no access to batteries, generators, solar panels...

  5. #5
    Tawaci ki a Gnaska ki Osito Polar's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    San Francisco, New California Republic
    Posts
    2,041
    Don't worry. We're on this one. Hackerspaces are great places to learn all sorts of stuff to make you a more well-versed geek. Knowledge need not exist in specialized silos.

    http://thecrucible.org -- they teach most of the stuff on this list

    If anyone wants to learn about fermenting, I could send you a SCOBY to start a kombucha colony. It's a very easy way to learn about raising friendly bacteria to help you make food. Pretty much it's like a floating mushroom that you grow in a tank of sweet tea, possibly mixed with herbs or fruit juice.
    "I don't have psychological problems." --Madrigal

    "When you write about shooting Polemarch in the head, that's more like a first-person view, like you're there looking down the sight of the gun." --Utisz

    David Wong, regarding Chicago
    Six centuries ago, the pre-Colombian natives who settled here named this region with a word which in their language means "the Mouth of Shadow". Later, the Iroquois who showed up and inexplicably slaughtered every man, woman and child renamed it "Seriously, Fuck that Place". When French explorer Jacques Marquette passed through the area he marked his map with a drawing of a brownish blob emerging from between the Devil's buttocks.

  6. #6
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
    Type
    eNTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Ceti Alpha V
    Posts
    15,250
    Quote Originally Posted by pathogenetic_peripatetic View Post
    Disseminating data is the best way to preserve them, though. The more copies there are, the less likely it will be lost. I don't see how we're just going to lose the ability to read magnetic hard drives and tapes, either. It's really simple to operate a computer and doesn't require huge amounts of infrastructure - hell, I could probably fill up a kindle with all that stuff and power it with a lemon, assuming I had no access to batteries, generators, solar panels...
    If you know what the devices holding the data are, and how to access the data, then yes. But if you don't then it's a bit more difficult to gain traction on that literacy. Having books on a flash drive is less accessible than having physical books. The access is more fragile--though the persistence is not.

    You have a less pessimistic view of how much can be lost. Meanwhile, there are artifacts around the world that are impressive in scope and design with no known purpose, yet, clearly, they were important for something to some people at some point in time.

    Let's take an entertaining example: let's say you stumbled across an alien data device. It held an enormous library of alien knowledge in compact package. How would you know? How would you know how to access it?

    With a sufficiently devastating event, the survivors of the species would be in a similar position. If literacy is plausibly at risk, then certainly computer literacy and technological competency is at risk.

    Quote Originally Posted by OrionzRevenge View Post
    This has an overall Humanitarian appeal to it and I'm not a survivalist zealot. When I see shows about bunker hoarders I think it useless unless you have massive amounts of money to invest.

    But in near-future terms, you could make yourself the indispensable wizard of a recovering community if you possessed vital knowledge.
    I agree. I think that the best thing to hoard isn't supplies, but knowledge and skills. They are more valuable in both the near and long term.
    I'm suspicious of people who say they'll die for a flag but won't wear a mask for their neighbor.

  7. #7
    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
    Type
    INtP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Shambala Road
    Posts
    3,074
    Quote Originally Posted by Osito Polar View Post
    Don't worry. We're on this one. Hackerspaces are great places to learn all sorts of stuff to make you a more well-versed geek. Knowledge need not exist in specialized silos.

    http://thecrucible.org -- they teach most of the stuff on this list

    If anyone wants to learn about fermenting, I could send you a SCOBY to start a kombucha colony. It's a very easy way to learn about raising friendly bacteria to help you make food. Pretty much it's like a floating mushroom that you grow in a tank of sweet tea, possibly mixed with herbs or fruit juice.
    Thanks, I'm glad to see there is an interest in this sort of stuff. I have to confess that my background in Microbiology let me down as I had to Google SCOBY. Sounds awesome.

    The Crucible folks look like they are doing a very worthwhile job of it, and having a knowledge of knack and technique would be something very difficult to translate into simple text.

    The more I look into this the more daunting the challenge seems to even equip an unfortunate future with the basic skill-set of Homo erectus with only 2/3rds. our brain mass.

    I have D/L the six volumes of Foxfire and Mother Earth News' 40 year collection (1970-2009) along with survival manuals. I also have found a couple of sites (groups) that explore primitive technology.

    http://www.primitiveways.com/
    http://www.wildwoodsurvival.com/survival/index.html

    There is also a BBC series about life skills on a Tudor Monastery Farm that really gets down & dirty with the primitive skills.

    If nothing else, the exploration hammers home just how desperate life was for our ancestors with nearly every waking moment given over to toil. We should make every effort not to have to return.
    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

  8. #8
    Tawaci ki a Gnaska ki Osito Polar's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    San Francisco, New California Republic
    Posts
    2,041
    Sorry -- to clarify SCOBY is a Symbiotic Colony Of Bacteria and Yeast. Production of vinegar, sourdough, ginger beer, kefir and kombucha require it.

    Yes, I would argue that passing along this sort of knowledge involves DOING the thing you're trying to learn. A lot of the skills aren't really that difficult to acquire, difficult to master sure but most of the time to work metal usefully or to build a functional rocket launcher (my project from this weekend, taught an 8 year old how to do this) you don't need a ton of knowledge.
    "I don't have psychological problems." --Madrigal

    "When you write about shooting Polemarch in the head, that's more like a first-person view, like you're there looking down the sight of the gun." --Utisz

    David Wong, regarding Chicago
    Six centuries ago, the pre-Colombian natives who settled here named this region with a word which in their language means "the Mouth of Shadow". Later, the Iroquois who showed up and inexplicably slaughtered every man, woman and child renamed it "Seriously, Fuck that Place". When French explorer Jacques Marquette passed through the area he marked his map with a drawing of a brownish blob emerging from between the Devil's buttocks.

  9. #9
    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
    Type
    INtP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Shambala Road
    Posts
    3,074
    Some Resources Perused:

    Primitive Pottery
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9biM0ZRqri4

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOoV0VlI05I

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nLyCQhKrJv0

    Loom weaving of wool
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ATIPcH19yBY

    Basket Weaving
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1weGXY2fFlk

    Quick and Easy Blackberry Bramble Basket
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpF9Wu8IuZc

    Making a Fish Trap Using Vines
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0zrqzSQf0A

    Primitive Fishing Tool - The Gorge Hook
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CtBmPUFqKrg


    Colin Mackenzie's, Ten Thousand Receipts:In All The Useful And Domestic Arts
    Edition Published in 1867 - 496 pages
    http://books.google.com/books?id=GZx...ceipts&f=false
    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

  10. #10
    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
    Type
    INtP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Shambala Road
    Posts
    3,074
    Some more videos

    How to Make Pine Pitch Glue
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8R4yExwKhS4

    Birch Container: Pine Pitch & Spruce Cord
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4c8ftFjus0

    How to make natural cordage from nettles
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQHvqWCN5Eo

    Making A Bow And Arrow And Fire With Stone Age Tools -Ray Mears
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ik7GbPEqljg

    That Ray Mears Dude, apparently has a British TV series about Bushcraft.
    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

Similar Threads

  1. Post your dreams
    By Anon in forum The Playground
    Replies: 635
    Last Post: 04-01-2020, 02:41 PM
  2. Post M or not.
    By LordLatch in forum The Pub
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-05-2015, 06:55 AM
  3. Zombie Apocalypse has happened....what is your strategy??
    By INTP_Polly in forum The Playground
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 05-03-2015, 05:10 AM
  4. MST3K Reboot:
    By msg_v2 in forum Arts & Entertainment
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-24-2014, 12:30 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •