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Thread: Pluto!

  1. #1
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    Pluto!

    I've been waiting for this for years. Of course, back then Pluto was a planet.

    http://www.computerworld.com/article...ous-pluto.html

    Edit: I guess it's still a year away. Still, though. I've been hearing about this for a long time...

  2. #2
    Member xel's Avatar
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    Yes! For my part, I'm super excited to see some better imagery of Pluto. The best imagery we have now isn't even good enough to name features: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:P...T2002-2003.jpg - though the creation of this image is an impressive bit of work in itself.

    The current imagery is 300,000 meter resolution, or about every 10 degrees on the ground. Expected resolution at closest flyby will be 50 meters, giving almost 47,000 pixels around the equator.

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    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xel View Post
    Yes! For my part, I'm super excited to see some better imagery of Pluto. The best imagery we have now isn't even good enough to name features: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:P...T2002-2003.jpg - though the creation of this image is an impressive bit of work in itself.

    The current imagery is 300,000 meter resolution, or about every 10 degrees on the ground. Expected resolution at closest flyby will be 50 meters, giving almost 47,000 pixels around the equator.


    Since Pluto and Charon are the only Double Tidal-Locked pair of significant objects we know of, It'll be interesting to see if the resolving asymmetry is in some way due to Pluto always showing one of these features towards Charon.

    If the sun wouldn't go Super-engulfing-giant long before then, The Earth with its huge tidal chip on its shoulder pushing the moon away, and the moon's tidal drag slowing down the Earth's day, would eventual cause a Double Tidal-locked pair here.
    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

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    No More BarIII feet! PLZ! Tlalocone's Avatar
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    No More BarIII feet! PLZ! Tlalocone's Avatar
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    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

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    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    From Forbes:

    Ten days before NASA ’s New Horizons spacecraft was due to make its closest approach to Pluto, the space agency reports that at 1:54 PM EDT on the afternoon of July 4th local U.S. time, it lost contact with the $700 million unmanned flyby mission for more than an hour and twenty minutes. Controllers were able to regain a signal from the probe via NASA’s Deep Space Network at 3:15 PM EDT, but as a result,

    During the time that it was out of contact with Earth, the probe’s “autonomous autopilot on board the spacecraft recognized a problem and – as it’s programmed to do in such a situation – switched from the main to the backup computer,” NASA reports in a statement issued via Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Lab, which manages the mission for the space agency. NASA says “the autopilot placed the spacecraft in “safe mode,” and commanded the backup computer to reinitiate communication with Earth.”

    The spacecraft, NASA reports, then began transmitting telemetry to help the engineers determine the root of the problem.

    “A New Horizons Anomaly Review Board (ARB ) was convened at 4 PM EDT to gather information on the problem and initiate a recovery plan,” the space agency noted. That team is now working to return the mission to its original flight plan which the agency reports may take from up to several days, during which the mission will not be able to collect any science data. ‘
    Artist’s concept of the New Horizons spacecraft as it approaches dwarf planet Pluto and its largest moon, Charon. Credit: NASA via Wikipedia

    Artist’s concept of the New Horizons spacecraft as it approaches dwarf planet Pluto and its largest moon, Charon. Credit: NASA via Wikipedia

    Recovery from the event is inherently hamstrung due to the 9-hour, round trip communication delay that the agency says “results from operating a spacecraft almost 3 billion miles (4.9 billion kilometers) from Earth.”

    As yet, there is no word on whether this will ultimately interfere with the spacecraft’s planned July 14 rendezvous with Pluto. But nearly a decade after launch, the mission has already been sending science data back from this unexplored outermost region of our Solar System. Just last week, members of the probe’s science team announced the detection of frozen methane on the dwarf planet’s surface.
    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

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    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    From Space.Com

    NASA's New Horizons spacecraft will be ready for its epic Pluto flyby next week despite a recent glitch, mission team members say.


    New Horizons went into a precautionary "safe mode" on Saturday (July 4) after experiencing an anomaly, but the problem did not turn out to be serious. New Horizons' handlers say the probe should be back to normal science operations by Tuesday (July 7), exactly one week before it performs the first-ever flyby of Pluto.


    "The investigation into the anomaly that caused New Horizons to enter 'safe mode' on July 4 has concluded that no hardware or software fault occurred on the spacecraft," mission team members wrote in an update Sunday (July 5). "The underlying cause of the incident was a hard-to-detect timing flaw in the spacecraft command sequence that occurred during an operation to prepare for the close flyby. No similar operations are planned for the remainder of the Pluto encounter."
    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

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    igKnight Hephaestus's Avatar
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    Someone somewhere ( @rincon?) should write a song about stalking the planets. That's what we're doing after all. We've figured out their schedule, and sent a camera to be near there and take pictures.
    --Mention of these things is so taboo, they aren't even allowed a name for the prohibition. It is just not done.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Senseye's Avatar
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    Just 7 days to go. I'm oddly excited about seeing some pictures of what is basically a large rock/iceball that aren't blurry. It would have been a true tragedy if after 10 years of flight time something glitched at the last moment. *touches wood*

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