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Thread: Health Professions

  1. #1
    TJ TeresaJ's Avatar
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    Health Professions

    This seems about as far from a typical INTP field as you can get, but here's how I see it:

    Pro's
    * One's work is immediately and practically useful
    For someone often mired in existential crisis, this is significant.

    * Interacting with a variety of people in a structured way
    Depending on the community, this can get very fun and fascinating. The professional setting allows for some good interactions without awkward smalltalk or getting hit on.

    * Opportunities for more interesting advancement
    With specialization and/or further education, one can build on practical experience and move into more abstract, systems-wide problem-solving. At least in theory.

    Con's

    * Bureaucratic BS times a million
    I know that this is true for many professions, but it seems to be particularly heinous for healthcare.

    * Working with a bunch of burnt out wrecks and/or sociopaths
    See above.

    ---

    Anyone else working or interested in health care? How do you like it?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by TeresaJ View Post
    This seems about as far from a typical INTP field as you can get, but here's how I see it:



    * Interacting with a variety of people in a structured way
    Depending on the community, this can get very fun and fascinating. The professional setting allows for some good interactions without awkward smalltalk or getting hit on.


    * Working with a bunch of burnt out wrecks and/or sociopaths
    See above.

    ---

    Anyone else working or interested in health care? How do you like it?

  3. #3
    TJ TeresaJ's Avatar
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    ^ <3

    And as for this possibly being an INTP-friendly field... Well, I guess the overwhelming response to this thread speaks for itself.

  4. #4
    Ieilaelite pensive_pilgrim's Avatar
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    I wouldn't want to go into healthcare. I've thought vaguely of going to medical school, mainly as a way to take my electrical engineering stuff in the direction of creating cyborgs, but realistically I'm never going to do that. Medical school, I mean, it sounds awful.

    I convinced my sister, an ESFP, to quit her retail job and get into a community college nursing program though. I'm excited for her but a little worried because apparently it's pretty competitive and the last time she tried school she failed colossally.

  5. #5
    Your Huckleberry lethe's Avatar
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    I have to other NTs in my family in the field, grew up around it. Even went to nursing school myself. I didn't flunk out, I left after having some experience.

    It was wonderful to learn about, the social dynamics would have been fine, and I don't get grossed by bodily fluids, functions or anything like that. I had a problem with the caring. Not that I couldn't make myself give care to anyone, or that I wasn't motivated... it was the actual act of doing "caring behaviors" for strangers.

    I learned that those acts are to me somehow intimate, personal, and take something away from me. Not the fake listening or pretending you care kind of acts, but simple acts like getting a glass of water or washing a wound. It bothers me on a deep level to do that for people I am not emotionally invested in. To know I was getting paid for it. It felt like selling my love. I suspect this is also why I can't stand serving jobs.
    Don't remember changing this.

  6. #6
    TJ TeresaJ's Avatar
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    Interesting... I see where you're coming from, but I just don't associate nursing with intimacy. Maybe it's just my own weird family, but I actually prefer the emotional distance of professionals to, say, my mother taking care of me. I wouldn't think of it as "I'm doing this because I care" but "I'm doing this because it needs to get done and I'm going to be as pleasant and reasonable about it as possible because that's how I believe people should be treated."

    To relate it to customer service: I've worked as a patient registrar and as a grocery store cashier, and I actually enjoyed having pleasant interactions with strangers. I think that part of it was that I was in New Orleans, which has the most genuinely entertaining, warm, fun people. Also, because the role is so structured, I didn't find it stressful. It was like using a script and then improvising if inspired to do so. I wasn't trying to make friends - I could be as outgoing as I wanted without running the risk of forming attachments.

    And because they were strangers I always assumed the best (unless they had a really off-putting attitude) and so was happy to try to make their day better. But for that to be true I think I would definitely have to care about the community as a whole. That's easy in New Orleans. If I didn't care about or disliked the people coming through, I can see how it would become extremely draining. Hmmm...

  7. #7
    Your Huckleberry lethe's Avatar
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    It can be difficult to describe. I didn't think or feel I was giving those acts because I cared, or was supposed to care.

    So I can bartend, and enjoy it. Like you, I found the social part pleasing and less stressful because of the structured role. But the second I have to waitress or bring a drink to someone, clean up after them.... No way. It drained me, felt wrong, almost soul sucking.

    It took me a while to figure out. It seems like there is a category of behaviors that consider "giving care". I'll happily do those things without thought or draining for those I love. In fact, I can use my desire to do those things as a clue to my deeper feelings about a person.

    But in my mind they have become an act of love. I can't sell my loving actions anymore than another person could sell their affection, sex, kisses, etc. Some acts are reserved for love, which makes them intimate.

    For some reason, children are exempt; I can be paid to care for them without personal cost.

    Other behaviors in that category include gentle touching, rubbing, grooming, and feeding. So I could never be a beautician, massage therapist, or cook.
    Don't remember changing this.

  8. #8
    The Pompatus of Love C.J.Woolf's Avatar
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    I work in clinical software development. Your pro #1 applies to me; I know what my work is good for. Burnt-out nurses, techs, and even MDs go into the field as subject matter experts, so that's one way to become part of the medical-industrial complex without having to see a patient.
    Your gardening sucks and your avocados ain't fruitin'. -- Sappho the Maestro

  9. #9
    (╯□)╯︵ ┻━┻ Deckard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TeresaJ View Post

    Con's

    * Bureaucratic BS times a million
    I know that this is true for many professions, but it seems to be particularly heinous for healthcare.

    * Working with a bunch of burnt out wrecks and/or sociopaths
    See above.

    ---

    Anyone else working or interested in health care? How do you like it?
    I dated an ENTJ all the way through her med school & into clinical practice. The study itself is a hard slog through mountains of fact memorisation. I can tell you that your two cons are absolutely true, perhaps more than you might imagine. You'd be dealing with a bunch of egos, ladder-climbers and authoritarian personalities on a daily basis. Scant funding in the health system means you'd be overworked & under-resourced, which either burns you out or turns you into an unsympathetic asshole. Medical practitioners have super high rates of depression.

    Perhaps the least INTP-friendly aspect of medicine is the lack of challenge once you're familiar with your field. Of course, that depends on what specialty you take, but the majority of them deal with the same common conditions every day, and challenging work is hard to come by. It's nothing like what you'll see on House.

  10. #10
    a cantori Perdix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by C.J.Woolf View Post
    I work in clinical software development.
    I've heard that's one of the best fields to be in at the moment.

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