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Thread: Is Overtraining a Myth?

  1. #1
    a cantori Perdix's Avatar
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    Is Overtraining a Myth?

    Please forgive the bro"science" in the articles (read: shit -- non academic -- sources) provided, but information is information.

    http://www.ironmanmagazine.com/the-myth-of-overtraining
    http://www.thedailybeast.com/article...rdio-myth.html
    http://douglasernstblog.com/2013/08/...ing-is-a-myth/
    https://experiencelife.com/article/o...and-fantasies/

    I have been really pushing my body everyday for the past several months and am curious as to whether overtraining is a myth, or a fact of reality.

    Has anyone here experienced overtraining symptoms? I'm particularly interested in @Sistamatic 's response, given her background (sorry for dragging you into this, sista').

  2. #2
    凸(ಠ_ರೃ )凸 stuck's Avatar
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    I have a tendency to push myself a little harder than I should sometimes. I've hit my immune system so hard from some sets that I've gotten colds- I've done this twice and it's not productive.

    I don't think there's any difference between not being recovered and overtraining. However, some elite pop fitness athletes like to pretend like overtraining doesn't exist, simply because they've grown accustomed to training so hard that they'd really have to spend some time and do something very stupid to reach that state. For instance, what if CT Fletcher decided to hit a deadlift PR every day for six months? If overtraining didn't exist, he should be able to do it and beat Andy Bolton's 1000+ pound deadlift by the end. More likely, his body is gonna tell him to drop the bar after a while. He might have to drop the bar for a good month and go back to 80+ types of concentration curls which only make his biceps sore.

    Other exercises have a much quicker regeneration, people can squat every day. Olympic althetes work out 2x a day or more. But they're still maintaining a level of volume their body can handle, because they're working primarily on movement efficiency- the overall volume of their work is not the primary concern. If typical joe dickface is trying to "get in shape", he's going to go work as hard as he can and then recover on his days off.

    Irritating topic, so much imprecision in the language.

  3. #3
    凸(ಠ_ರೃ )凸 stuck's Avatar
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    To be concise:

    Your CNS is a real thing. You can accumulate fatigue, a fact which is built into some programs (Madcow and 5/3/1 both have forced deloads). People are different, their CNS's are different, their CNS's can be trained, not everything hits the CNS as hard as everything else- sometimes exercise can be very subjectively painful without objectively being as draining. I never feel the deadlifts or squats that slay me.

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    Tenonditis is what i earned from overtraiining. On both my elbows and shoulders. I am better now but sometimes not Whatever you do warm up and do stretching before you start. It makes a huge difference from my experience.

  5. #5
    Member mthomps's Avatar
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    It's easy for beginners to overtrain by getting doms or THINK hey over trained because they made a specific join or tendon REALLY REALLY sore. Intermediates who can move some weight will have a lot more trouble doing it unless they have so much low intensity high volume work their work outs take 2 1/2 to 3 hours of constant muscle stress.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Spartan26's Avatar
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    I remember hearing someone years ago who was rather studied on the exercise/weight train matter and there was some odd stat he recited that I can't remember the numbers but large percentage of the so-called strength gained comes in the final two reps of lifting. That point of really straining to get the bar up. (The straining point is the key not doing 8-10-12 etc). But without the requisite rest period and proper feeding of the muscles then it becomes a point of over exertion and you damage muscle tissue. I think there is a point or range of overtraining, I just think it's hard to pinpoint. I don't think people know until they're injured.

    I was actually thinking about this the other day. There are some college coaches who work out guys at my gym. They aren't standing over them with whistles or anything like that but they do set up some pretty specific exercises with a calculated gradual increase of difficulty. Guys will laugh in between their reps and they don't seem like they're in a particular hurry but man when they go you can see the specific muscles they're targeting and it's all focus on the matter. I never see them eat but I know they've got their packets of goo and plenty of water in their bottles they go to between exercises. Fifty-some years ago, Bear Bryant would take his players out to the desert in the high sun part of the day and work 'em until they dropped to toughen them up. That mentality lasted for years and years. Of course there's the liability factor but most coaches today don't believe players need to get to heat stroke level of endurance to be in full condition. It really doesn't do any good. I think they want guys who'll push themselves and go that extra step but there's a reason they have certain patterns to training and lifting and light walk-throughs.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by stuck View Post
    I have a tendency to push myself a little harder than I should sometimes. I've hit my immune system so hard from some sets that I've gotten colds- I've done this twice and it's not productive.

    I don't think there's any difference between not being recovered and overtraining. However, some elite pop fitness athletes like to pretend like overtraining doesn't exist, simply because they've grown accustomed to training so hard that they'd really have to spend some time and do something very stupid to reach that state. For instance, what if CT Fletcher decided to hit a deadlift PR every day for six months? If overtraining didn't exist, he should be able to do it and beat Andy Bolton's 1000+ pound deadlift by the end. More likely, his body is gonna tell him to drop the bar after a while. He might have to drop the bar for a good month and go back to 80+ types of concentration curls which only make his biceps sore.

    Other exercises have a much quicker regeneration, people can squat every day. Olympic althetes work out 2x a day or more. But they're still maintaining a level of volume their body can handle, because they're working primarily on movement efficiency- the overall volume of their work is not the primary concern. If typical joe dickface is trying to "get in shape", he's going to go work as hard as he can and then recover on his days off.

    Irritating topic, so much imprecision in the language.
    This. But it's really an individual thing. Depends on your age, pain tolerance, fitness level, motivational level, etc... some people are probably incapable of overtraining, while other are very prone to it. Aside from injury, the biggest factor is immune system. Just like stuck, I've compromised my immune system many times getting over exuberant with training. I force myself to be a bit more conservative these days just for that reason. My natural tendency is to grin and bare it to the edge of sanity. The older I get, the more that attitude nets negative results over the long term. That said, I don't remember having that issue when I was 20. I certainly have it now though.
    Quote Originally Posted by whatloveihave View Post
    I don't find you a potential threat to human society, you're not crazy. Feces.

  8. #8
    Hasta Siempre Madrigal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stigmatica View Post
    My natural tendency is to grin and bare it
    Everything under heaven is in utter chaos; the situation is excellent. - Mao

  9. #9
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    I don't think its a myth its like a gun BEING over heated by firing so much you're in danger of melting the metal together if that's possible. Just think of it as something logical like anything else of matter in this world.

  10. #10
    Member Ependymin's Avatar
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    I think your body would tell you if you were overtraining, wouldn't it? Constant fatigue, sleeplessness, tendonitis?

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