Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Local language variants

  1. #1
    <3 gator's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,432
    INTPx Award Winner

    Local language variants

    I've been thinking a lot lately about different local variants of English and what they say about the people who use them.

    For example, in England you are "sent mad," whereas in North America you're more likely to be "driven mad." The two have very different connotations when you consider the kind of personal agency involved, accepting some sort of order as opposed to being forced or compelled in a particular direction.

    Thoughts? Or what other examples can you think of where different populations using the same language will go about expressing a similar concept in a different way?

  2. #2
    Mens bona regnum possidet ferrus's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Barcelona, Catalonia
    Posts
    5,669
    There are so many between British and American English.

    But actually many within England. There was a scouser at worker who said they called ice lollies "lolly ices" in Liverpool. This just said to me that northerners don't know how to speak properly.
    Die Logik ist keine Lehre, sondern ein Spiegelbild der Welt. Die Logik ist transcendental. - Wittgenstein

  3. #3
    Scobblelotcher Sistamatic's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    4,441
    INTPx Award Winner
    Quote Originally Posted by ferrus View Post
    There are so many between British and American English.

    But actually many within England. There was a scouser at worker who said they called ice lollies "lolly ices" in Liverpool. This just said to me that northerners don't know how to speak properly.
    I wasn't sure what an ice lolly was since I have not ever heard the term before so I googled it. My guess was correct and I found this in wikipedia. Of note. .. lolly ice is not included in this list .

    "An ice pop is a water-based frozen snack. It is also called popsicle(Canada, U.S.), freeze pop (Ireland, U.S.), ice lolly(United Kingdom, Ireland), ice block, icy pole(parts of Australia and New Zealand), chihiro (Cayman Islands),[1] It is made by freezing flavored liquid(such as fruit juice) around a stick.
    Often, the juice is colored artificially. [2] Once the liquid freezes solid, the stick can be used as a handle to hold the ice pop. When an ice pop does not have a stick, it is called, among other names, a freezie."

    French and Cajun French are so dissimilar that speakers of one can barely communicate with speakers of the other.
    Insults are effective only where emotion is present. -- Spock, "Who Mourns for Adonais?" Stardate 3468.1.

    I'm not avoiding socializing I'm helping socializing avoid me! --MoneyJungle

  4. #4
    <3 gator's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,432
    INTPx Award Winner
    I used to run into a lot of them when I had Quebecois housemates. They had lots of friends who were French. Lots of words like sleepover are very innocent in Quebec, but mean something like orgy in France so there were lots of misunderstandings.

  5. #5
    -
    Type
    xxxx
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,101
    By the by, dear native English speakers, I am deeply heart-broken to inform you that your world domination is on its last legs. The other day an acquaintance informed me that Viennese is to become the new world language.

  6. #6
    schlemiel Faust's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,180
    Quote Originally Posted by gator View Post
    I used to run into a lot of them when I had Quebecois housemates. They had lots of friends who were French. Lots of words like sleepover are very innocent in Quebec, but mean something like orgy in France so there were lots of misunderstandings.
    Quebecois aren't the sort to mince words, that's for sure.

Similar Threads

  1. Body Language
    By mthomps in forum Health & Fitness
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 12-30-2013, 02:50 PM
  2. Problems of philosophy, or language puzzles?
    By kali in forum Philosophy & Spirituality
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 12-26-2013, 04:46 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •