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Thread: Chronic tiredness

  1. #1
    Cooler than Jesus
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    Chronic tiredness

    Are you someone that is constantly tired, out of energy, feeling like taking a nap, or just saying fuck it all and going to Alaska? If so, how does it impact your life? What do you do to combat it?

    *****

    I have a full time job that results in me being out of the house for about 11 hours a day. I work a regular 8 hour workday, but my daily round-trip commute is about 2 hours, and there is another hour lunch break in there. On top of that, I'm working on industry-related certifications that require about 12 hours a week of studying. This has made me realize the fact that I am constantly tired, and that when I'm tired, I'm much shittier at concentration, memory retention, and other general cognitive stuff. When I'm studying I have a hard time concentrating for as little as 10 minutes. The other day though, after having some free time, I took a short nap in the afternoon and was able to study for a full hour with no problem whatsoever. Considering I don't get home until 9pm, taking a nap typically isn't possible.

    I realize there's various things you can do to combat this. Exercise, not drinking alcohol before bed, getting at least 6-8 hours of sleep, etc, but even when I've done these things and wake up feeling refreshed, the fact that I'm commuting, working, or being annoyed by coworkers (lunch hour) for 11 hours saps a lot of energy. It's difficult to muster energy to do the daily tasks required in life, prepare meals, study, and have any time left over for recreation/socialization.

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    Sysop Ptah's Avatar
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    While I can't say it was to the same degree, there was a time in which I was stuck in such a perpetual cycle of tired due to work and other commitments. In my case, the trite solution prevailed: exercise and diet. Specifically, running (cardio) and vast reduction of sugars, caffeine, etc. Was neither easy nor fun, at first, but it was necessary to escape the funk. Yes, that run into barriers of work and other commitments. The game then was "making" the time to exercise, prepare/decided upon proper meals, etc. Wasn't perfect, but overall it worked (over the course of a spring-summer stretch). I told myself, "you got yourself down this hole, you can crawl back out of it."

  3. #3
    Cooler than Jesus
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ptah View Post
    While I can't say it was to the same degree, there was a time in which I was stuck in such a perpetual cycle of tired due to work and other commitments. In my case, the trite solution prevailed: exercise and diet. Specifically, running (cardio) and vast reduction of sugars, caffeine, etc. Was neither easy nor fun, at first, but it was necessary to escape the funk. Yes, that run into barriers of work and other commitments. The game then was "making" the time to exercise, prepare/decided upon proper meals, etc. Wasn't perfect, but overall it worked (over the course of a spring-summer stretch). I told myself, "you got yourself down this hole, you can crawl back out of it."
    An easy solution to the exercise problem for me is biking to work. This actually kills two birds with one stone because it cuts down my commute time by nearly half. Unfortunately that's only if weather is permitting, and I have a working bicycle. Neither of which are the case right now.

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    Sysop Ptah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lud View Post
    An easy solution to the exercise problem for me is biking to work. This actually kills two birds with one stone because it cuts down my commute time by nearly half. Unfortunately that's only if weather is permitting, and I have a working bicycle. Neither of which are the case right now.
    I can understand that hurdle. Presently, since I don't go to a gym, my running routine only holds during fair weather (hence, not over much of winter). Again, it isn't perfect, but I've found that as long as I sustain a decent diet despite not running for a stretch, my energy levels are better than they would be were I to leave myself to default behaviors. Never easy or perfect, but necessary and to some extent effective nonetheless.

  5. #5
    Cooler than Jesus
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ptah View Post
    I can understand that hurdle. Presently, since I don't go to a gym, my running routine only holds during fair weather (hence, not over much of winter). Again, it isn't perfect, but I've found that as long as I sustain a decent diet despite not running for a stretch, my energy levels are better than they would be were I to leave myself to default behaviors. Never easy or perfect, but necessary and to some extent effective nonetheless.
    Did you run every day, or just a few times a week? The hardest part for me is sacrificing that time at the end of the night. If I decide to run in the morning, basically my only time to do it, I'd either have to go to bed an hour earlier at night (and so have only 3 hours after getting home from work to eat and unwind) or sacrifice that time in sleep, which seems like it'd be counterproductive.

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    Sysop Ptah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lud View Post
    Did you run every day, or just a few times a week? The hardest part for me is sacrificing that time at the end of the night. If I decide to run in the morning, basically my only time to do it, I'd either have to go to bed an hour earlier at night (and so have only 3 hours after getting home from work to eat and unwind) or sacrifice that time in sleep, which seems like it'd be counterproductive.
    At first, I ran every other day (for among other reasons, to give my then-out-of-shape body a chance to recover between runs). I ran mornings, before work. So, yes, I had to get up that much earlier. Again, it was not pleasant or easy, and again I admit it doesn't seem as though I was operating under such a time crunch as you are (I was getting about 5-6 hours of sleep, adjusted for getting up early, at the time). In any case, I found that running in the morning by itself had a positive effect on my energy level throughout the rest of the day, just on a day-to-day basis, before any accumulated fitness dynamic took hold on my alertness and energy levels overall. That is what compelled me to adjust my schedule and keep with it.

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    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lud View Post
    This actually kills two birds with one stone because it cuts down my commute time by nearly half.
    I've rarely heard a better reason to get a bike. Total no-brainer to me.

    As for weather--there are ways around it. Rain can be managed. Snow however, is problem. It accumulates on the sprockets and chain, eventually throwing the chain off. And by 'eventually' I mean 'frequently'. And by 'frequently' I mean it would be faster to walk.

    Darkness in Autumn and Winter are probably the real biggest barriers. If there's risk of you riding before civil twilight in the morning, or after civil twilight in the evening, you'll want good lights, and good lights aren't cheap. There are cheap lights, they just aren't good.

    Warmth is either self-made or enhanced with textiles. I'm not saying it isn't a challenge, just that there are solutions--if you can afford them.

    I'm just saying that if I knew my commute would be cut in half by biking instead of driving, I'd be biking ASAP.
    I'm suspicious of people who say they'll die for a flag but won't wear a mask for their neighbor.

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    Same here. I've got no solutions, but working on it. When I lived in Seattle I used a SAD lamp that helped.

  10. #10
    non-canonical Light Leak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lud View Post
    Are you someone that is constantly tired, out of energy, feeling like taking a nap, or just saying fuck it all and going to Alaska? If so, how does it impact your life? What do you do to combat it?
    Yes. This is me... I think. I don't do anything special about it. It's just become normal and sometimes I question whether or not it's really tiredness that I'm feeling. What if that is actually normal and I think I should just feel more energetic for some crazy reason? I don't know. I have no answers.

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