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Thread: US soldiers recently routinely raped Colombians, including children

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    US soldiers recently routinely raped Colombians, including children

    US soldiers rape Colombians

    US soldiers and military contractors sexually abused at least 54 children in Colombia between 2003 and 2007, according to a recently released historic document on the country’s conflict. The suspects have allegedly not been prosecuted due to immunity clauses in bilateral agreements....

    One case that has called most attention in Colombian media was that of a 12-year-old who in 2007 was raped by a US Army sergeant and a former US military officer who was working in Melgar as a military contractor.

    Colombian prosecutors established that the girl had been drugged and subsequently raped inside the military base by US sergeant Michael J. Coen and defense contractor Cesar Ruiz.
    Basically some (a lot of?) psychopaths in the US military stationed in Colombia went on a rape spree because they have political immunity. This isn't some horror story from the 70s, this was just a few years ago. You can't even find this story in US sources. There's something from the place I linked, the Daily Mail, and some other independent news outlets, but I guarantee that this will never make a story in CNN. What should be done about this? Realistically, I mean, considering that it's obvious that legally, nothing is going to be done.

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    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lud View Post
    US soldiers rape Colombians

    Basically some (a lot of?) psychopaths in the US military stationed in Colombia went on a rape spree because they have political immunity. This isn't some horror story from the 70s, this was just a few years ago. You can't even find this story in US sources. There's something from the place I linked, the Daily Mail, and some other independent news outlets, but I guarantee that this will never make a story in CNN. What should be done about this? Realistically, I mean, considering that it's obvious that legally, nothing is going to be done.
    There are some significant creditability issues here, but don't let that stop anyone from buying it hook, line & sinker.

    FARC is basically a Drug Cartel/Rebel Army. As the linked article notes, FARC and the sitting government are trying to end the war but have a sticking point about who is going to accept the blame for 7.3 million victims of war crimes.

    You know, sometimes the US gets blamed because it helps take the focus off of the real fuck-ups.

    Example: US blamed for aiding Israel in the Six Day War.

    Reason: Jordan & Egypt got their asses kicked by little Israel.

    Background: the conflict was spurred on by the USSR because they thought Israeli defiance was being orchestrated by the US trying to get even over the Soviet's involvement in the Vietnam War. Later the Soviets informed Jordan, Syria, and Egypt that the analysis was wrong but popular momentum for war was by then too great.

    Fallout: in 1968 RFK was Assassinated By a Jordanian (Sirhan Sirhan)

    Spoiler: Here's what easily found sources say about FARC in the Wiki:


    Human rights concerns


    Terrorist attack by the FARC with a car bomb at the headquarters of Caracol Radio, the attack left 43 people injured.




    2012 Car Bombing targeting the former minister, Fernando Londoño.





    FARC has been accused of committing violations of human rights by numerous groups, including Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, the United Nations as well as by the Colombian, U.S. and European Union governments.


    A February 2005 report from the United Nations' High Commissioner for Human Rights mentioned that, during 2004, "FARC-EP continued to commit grave breaches [of human rights] such as murders of protected persons, torture and hostage-taking, which affected many civilians, including men, women, returnees, boys and girls, and ethnic groups."[234]

    Child soldiers

    FARC-EP, the ELN and right-wing paramilitaries all train teens as soldiers and informants. Human Rights Watch estimates that the FARC-EP has the majority of child combatants in Colombia, and that approximately one quarter of its guerrillas are under 18.[235][236] Forcible recruitment of children, by either side, is rare in Colombia. They join for a variety of reasons including poverty, lack of educational opportunities, avoiding dangerous work in coca processing, escaping from domestic violence, offers of money (mostly from paramilitaries, who pay their soldiers).[235] Human Rights Watch has noted that "once integrated into the FARC-EP, children are typically barred from leaving".[237]
    FARC-EP Commander Simón Trinidad has stated that FARC does not allow the enlistment of people under 15 years of age, arguing that this is in accordance with Article 38 of the United Nations' Convention on the Rights of the Child.[238] He has argued that the alternatives for many children in Colombia are worse, including prostitution and exploitative work in mines and coca production.[238][239] Amnesty International has rejected the validity of such a position in international law.[221]
    In June 2000, FARC-EP Commander Carlos Antonio Lozada told Human Rights Watch that the minimum recruitment age of fifteen years was set in 1996 but admitted that "this norm was not enforced" until recently. Lozada said, however, that it had become an obligatory standard after Commander Jorge Briceño's statements on the matter in April 2000.[240] A 2001 Human Rights Watch report considered FARC-EP's refusal to admit children under fifteen years old into their forces to be "encouraging" but added that there is "little evidence that this rule is being strictly applied" and called on the group to demobilize all existing child soldiers and cease this practice in the future.[237]
    In 2003, Human Rights Watch reported that FARC-EP shows no leniency to children because of their age, assigning minors the same duties as adults and sometimes requiring them to participate in executions or witness torture.[235]

    Extrajudicial executions

    FARC has consistently carried out attacks against civilians specifically targeting suspected supporters of paramilitary groups, political adversaries, journalists, local leaders, and members of certain indigenous groups since at least as early as 1994.[241] From 1994 to 1997 the region of Urabá in Antioquia department was the site of FARC attacks against civilians.[241] FARC has also executed civilians for failing to pay "war taxes" to their group.[241]
    In 2001, Human Rights Watch (HRW) denounced that the FARC-EP had abducted and executed civilians accused of supporting paramilitary groups in the demilitarized zone and elsewhere, without providing any legal defense mechanisms to the suspects and generally refusing to give any information to relatives of the victims. The human rights NGO directly investigated three such cases and received additional information about over twenty possible executions during a visit to the zone.[242]



    According to HRW, those extrajudicial executions would qualify as forced disappearances if they had been carried out by agents of the government or on its behalf, but nevertheless remained "blatant violations of the FARC-EP's obligations under international humanitarian law and in particular key provisions of article 4 of Protocol II, which protects against violence to the life, physical, and mental well-being of persons, torture, and ill-treatment."[242]
    The Colombian human rights organization CINEP reported that FARC-EP killed an estimated total of 496 civilians during 2000.[242]

    Use of gas cylinder mortars and landmines

    The FARC-EP has employed a type of improvised mortars made from gas canisters (or cylinders), when launching attacks.
    According to Human Rights Watch, the FARC-EP has killed civilians not involved in the conflict through the use of gas cylinder mortars[243] and its use of landmines.[244]
    Human Rights Watch considers that "the FARC-EP's continued use of gas cylinder mortars shows this armed group's flagrant disregard for lives of civilians...gas cylinder bombs are impossible to aim with accuracy and, as a result, frequently strike civilian objects and cause avoidable civilian casualties."[245]



    According to the ICBL Landmine and Cluster Munitions Monitor, "FARC is probably the most prolific current user of antipersonnel mines among rebel groups anywhere in the world." Furthermore, FARC use child soldiers to carry and deploy antipersonnel mines.[246]

    Violence against indigenous people

    FARC has sometimes threatened or assassinated indigenous Colombian leaders for attempting to prevent FARC incursions into their territory and resisting the forcible recruitment by FARC of indigenous youth. Between 1986 and 2001, FARC was responsible for 27 assassinations, 15 threats, and 14 other abuses of indigenous people in Antioquia Department.[68] In March 1999 members of a local FARC contingent killed 3 indigenous rights activists, who were working with the U'Wa people to build a school for U'Wa children, and were fighting against encroachment of U'Wa territory by multinational oil corporations. The killings were almost universally condemned, and seriously harmed public perceptions of FARC.[68]



    Members of indigenous groups have demanded the removal of military bases set up by the Colombian government and guerrilla encampments established by FARC in their territories, claiming that both the Colombian National Army and the FARC should respect indigenous autonomy and international humanitarian law.[247][248][249] According to the National Indigenous Organization of Colombia (ONIC), 80.000 members of indigenous communities have been displaced from their native lands since 2004 because of FARC-related violence.[250] Luis Evelis, an indigenous leader and ONIC representative, has stated that "the armed conflict is still in force, causing damages to the indigenous. Our territories are self-governed and we demand our autonomy. During the year 2011, fifty-six indigenous people have been killed."[251] The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples has indicated that no military activities may be carry out within indigenous territories without first undertaking an "effective consultation" with indigenous representatives and authorities from the communities involved.[249][252]



    The Regional Indigenous Council of Cauca (CRIC) issued a statement concerning the release of two hostages taken by FARC in 2011: "Compared to past statements made by the national government, it is important to reiterate that the presence of armed groups in our territories is a fact that has been imposed by force of arms, against which our communities and their leaders have remained in peaceful resistance." The CRIC also indicated that neither the Colombian government nor the mediators and armed groups involved consulted with the indigenous people and their authorities about the hostage release, raising concerns about the application of national and international law guaranteeing their autonomy, self-determination and self-government. The indigenous organization also demanded the immediate end of all violence and conflict within indigenous territories and called for a negotiated solution to the war.[253]



    Official Colombian government statistics show that murders of indigenous people between January and May 2011 have increased 38% compared to the same timeframe in 2010.[254] Colombia is home to nearly 1 million indigenous people, divided into around 100 different ethnicities. The Colombian Constitutional Court has warned that 35 of those groups are in danger of dying out.[255] The Permanent Assembly for the Defense of Life and Territorial Control has stated that the armed conflict "is not only part of one or two areas, it is a problem of all the indigenous people."[256]

    Sexual abuse and forced abortions

    According to Amnesty International, both civilian women and female combatants have been sexually exploited or victimized by all of the different parties involved in the Colombian armed conflict.[257] In the case of FARC, it has been reported that young female recruits have been sexually abused by veteran guerrilla soldiers and in several cases pregnancies were aborted against their will by FARC doctors.[257][258][259][260]



    EDIT:
    Thanks Repper.
    That's RFK not JFK. Have fixed.
    Last edited by OrionzRevenge; 03-29-2015 at 02:56 AM.
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  3. #3
    igKnight Hephaestus's Avatar
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    The story leaks a bit from another angle too. A federal law was passed some years ago in an effort to stem child-sex tourism in developing countries, making it illegal for US citizens to do anything in another country that was illegal in the US. So even if these people had immunity from Columbian governments, they would be completely liable to the DOJ--and to their military branches.
    --Mention of these things is so taboo, they aren't even allowed a name for the prohibition. It is just not done.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OrionzRevenge View Post
    There are some significant creditability issues here, but don't let that stop anyone from buying it hook, line & sinker.

    FARC is basically a Drug Cartel/Rebel Army. As the linked article notes, FARC and the sitting government are trying to end the war but have a sticking point about who is going to accept the blame for 7.3 million victims of war crimes.
    Yeah, we all know who FARC is. I'm not advocating them, but are you really saying we should just brush the whole thing off because FARC is involved in the report? And I'm really not seeing your point regarding the war crime victims and this. There's zero indication they're trying to blame the US for the FARC conflicts. I know many Colombians and they aren't that stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    The story leaks a bit from another angle too. A federal law was passed some years ago in an effort to stem child-sex tourism in developing countries, making it illegal for US citizens to do anything in another country that was illegal in the US. So even if these people had immunity from Columbian governments, they would be completely liable to the DOJ--and to their military branches.
    Yeah, good luck getting them on trial. I'm sure the DOJ is just eager to take the case.

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    凸(ಠ_ರೃ )凸 stuck's Avatar
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    It's on the FAIR site and Democracy Now, so this might be one of those stories that's just being buried for some reason. That's not common, but it does happen.

    Sounds plausible to me, let's see if it sticks.

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    凸(ಠ_ರೃ )凸 stuck's Avatar
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    The writer of the original article says this in the comments for the FAIR site

    "Adriaan Alsema
    1 day ago
    Hi, I am the author of the article on Colombia Reports.
    US media have probably not reported on my story because I only exposed the claim of one scholar. This is not evidence and may not be presented as a hard fact.
    I published the article because I think it’s important the claim is verified. It’s in the historic report on a 50-year-long armed conflict, which is why I believe the claim is significant and should be exposed.
    Authorities and other journalists can now verify and either confirm the claim with evidence or debunk it.
    My article shouldn’t just have been copy- pasted like The Daily Mail, TeleSUR and RT did. That’s not media doing their job, but tabloid or politically motivated media outlets NOT doing their job.
    If US media are taking more time to investigate the veracity of the claim that would be a good thing. This should take time if done seriously. Seventy-two hours could impossibly be enough."

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    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lud View Post
    Yeah, we all know who FARC is. I'm not advocating them, but are you really saying we should just brush the whole thing off because FARC is involved in the report? And I'm really not seeing your point regarding the war crime victims and this. There's zero indication they're trying to blame the US for the FARC conflicts. I know many Colombians and they aren't that stupid.....
    Where did I say that?

    I said "credibility".

    No one is ever that stupid, are they?
    No one ever blames someone else to have peace on the home-front, do they?
    No one would ever put words in another person's mouth, would they?
    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

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    Global Moderator Polemarch's Avatar
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    There are two opposing views that people bring with them into conversations like this:

    a. That the powerful routinely victimize the non-powerful, and where there's smoke there's probably fire
    vs
    b. That people who evangelize viewpoint (a) are quick to project those views onto everything whether appropriate or not and have no concern about actual facts

    And both are somewhat true.

    tl;dr unverified claims are unverified, no good reason to react either way, until the credibility exceeds some standard of reasonableness.
    We didn't land on Plymouth Rock. Plymouth Rock landed on us.

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    Hasta Siempre Madrigal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrionzRevenge View Post
    FARC is basically a Drug Cartel/Rebel Army.
    I think we can safely call this 50+ year old movement a rebel army before a drug cartel. Not that you'd ever be biased on purpose, Ozzy.

    And it's a little preposterous that this is the Colombian govt and FARC elaborating an anti-yankee historical narrative together. Latin American terror regimes have basically spawned three official narratives, and Colombia still hasn't elaborated its second one - which is what they're doing now. Meaning it's decades behind in comparison to other countries, not that this is any coincidence.

    (FYI: First narrative justifies state repression by demonizing the guerilla. The second narrative, aka "the theory of the two devils", is one that blames both state terror and guerilla terror. Lastly, more recent political trends emerging from the "Pink Tide" of the turn of the century have restored the guerillas' reputation and recognized the state as the source of terror.)
    Everything under heaven is in utter chaos; the situation is excellent. - Mao

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    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polemarch View Post
    There are two opposing views that people bring with them into conversations like this:

    a. That the powerful routinely victimize the non-powerful, and where there's smoke there's probably fire
    vs
    b. That people who evangelize viewpoint (a) are quick to project those views onto everything whether appropriate or not and have no concern about actual facts

    And both are somewhat true.

    tl;dr unverified claims are unverified, no good reason to react either way, until the credibility exceeds some standard of reasonableness.
    Are they???
    Have any of the sensational stories, that have been hot topics here, panned out???

    To be clear, I was reacting to this being presented as a Fait Accompli.

    If the media can't risk it coming out of there wallets to point out these stories have more holes than Swiss Cheese...someone has to.


    Quote Originally Posted by Madrigal View Post
    I think we can safely call this 50+ year old movement a rebel army before a drug cartel. Not that you'd ever be biased on purpose, Ozzy.

    And it's a little preposterous that this is the Colombian govt and FARC elaborating an anti-yankee historical narrative together. Latin American terror regimes have basically spawned three official narratives, and Colombia still hasn't elaborated its second one - which is what they're doing now. Meaning it's decades behind in comparison to other countries, not that this is any coincidence.

    (FYI: First narrative justifies state repression by demonizing the guerilla. The second narrative, aka "the theory of the two devils", is one that blames both state terror and guerilla terror. Lastly, more recent political trends emerging from the "Pink Tide" of the turn of the century have restored the guerillas' reputation and recognized the state as the source of terror.)
    Bias? Well, let's just say, from my POV, what I know most about FARC is how they supply the drugs that have turned thousands of Yankee kids into addict-prostitutes and victims of rape or worse.

    Certainly no more preposterous than FARC and The Colombian Government being able to have a peace where each acknowledges the War Crimes they themselves committed against the populace.
    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

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