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Thread: Is everyone hanging out without me?

  1. #1
    Retired NotThinDennis's Avatar
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    Is everyone hanging out without me?

    I'm getting into all these INTP forums. The complex is one of the major hubs I hear...

    Looking forward to rubbing my noodle against your's ever so gently and gaining brilliant new insights as a result.

    Am an ESL teacher by trade. Lived in China, many parts, for about 3 years. Majored in economics. Speak French/Chinese fluently. Obsessed with all things Ayurveda. Also interested in Chinese medicine and other ancient medical systems. Also interested in many different religions, including Buddhism and Hinduism. Very interested in geopolitics and prognosticating about the state of the world, and of course all things personality. One of my aims is to define the correlation between Ayurvedic body types and MB personality types...

    Tired now [yawn]

  2. #2
    Sysop Ptah's Avatar
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    Welcome aboard!


    *off to research Ayurveda*

    Edit: Is your interest in religions primarily "Eastern"?

  3. #3
    Dr.Awkward Robcore's Avatar
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    I have limited knowledge of Aryuveda...only what I read in Deepak Chopra's books when I was in my teens and early 20s. What sticks out to me most is what I read about the Doshas. At the time I first read about them, I was distinctly a Pitta-type, but after a few years of diving head first into spirituality, I did the tests again several times and came up fairly balanced between the 3 types...which seems cool, though I never came across anything particularly prescriptive for when the 3 are relatively even. At least when you're distinctly Kappha, Pitta or Vatta, you can follow a dietary regimen and other patterns that are well established for those types.
    I also liked being a Pitta type because I could handle tons of calories and junk food without consequence. I'm still fairly lean, but the furnace doesn't burn quite as hot these days, lol.

    Anyhow, your interests seem to intersect with mine in some ways, and to extend outside of them in interesting directions too...so, welcome!
    ...the origin of emotional sickness lay in people’s belief that they were their personalities...
    "The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong." ~Carl Jung

  4. #4
    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum.

    I'm completely ignorant of Ayurveda, but as a rule I think all traditional medicines should be researched using modern western clinical methods.

    Just this past week came news that an Anglo-Saxon eye infection salve killed 90% of the MRSA Staph bacteria that were exposed to it.

    This could very easily translate into lives being saved in the near future. Where antibiotics have failed and people are literally being eaten alive by MRSA bacteria.

    I became a believer in the effectiveness of some G-Jo (Acupressure) techniques back in the early 1980s. As pinching that sweet spot in the upper lip instantly negates muscle cramps in the lower leg. (My personal anecdote with a number of converts, with similar testimonials, will attest). This is certainly an area where Western Medicine needs to find an explanation for the effectiveness of said. Thus far they haven't.

    At the same time however when the Science says there is no basis for its effectiveness, then this should be given every consideration. For example, there is nothing in Rhino Horn that you wont find in human fingernails, so if you buy into some effect then chew your nails and don't create a market demand for the last surviving Rhinos.

    Anyways, Well met.
    Enjoy your time at the forum.
    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

  5. #5
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    I'd hazard the guess that many INTPs are of the Kapha type, though not all of us are pronouncedly rotund.

  6. #6
    Retired NotThinDennis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ptah View Post
    Welcome aboard!


    *off to research Ayurveda*

    Edit: Is your interest in religions primarily "Eastern"?
    My interest has mainly been in Eastern religions and philosophy like Buddhism and Hinduism. After having read about the Vedic religion, I have become a convert of the Law of Karma, and I do believe in reincarnation. I find the idea of the universe being ruled by cause & effect not only in the gross physical world but also in the more subtle spiritual plane to be extremely appealing. For me, it explains why some people are born in abject circumstances and others not...it is their karma (no luck or misfortune, just the inevitable result of the sum total of all their actions and those of others in past lives). In this worldview, personal responsibility is of the utmost importance, and I like the fact that their is no heaven or hell except the one we create for ourselves, and this can extend well beyond our present lives...

    Quote Originally Posted by Robcore View Post
    I have limited knowledge of Aryuveda...only what I read in Deepak Chopra's books when I was in my teens and early 20s. What sticks out to me most is what I read about the Doshas. At the time I first read about them, I was distinctly a Pitta-type, but after a few years of diving head first into spirituality, I did the tests again several times and came up fairly balanced between the 3 types...which seems cool, though I never came across anything particularly prescriptive for when the 3 are relatively even. At least when you're distinctly Kappha, Pitta or Vatta, you can follow a dietary regimen and other patterns that are well established for those types.
    I also liked being a Pitta type because I could handle tons of calories and junk food without consequence. I'm still fairly lean, but the furnace doesn't burn quite as hot these days, lol.

    Anyhow, your interests seem to intersect with mine in some ways, and to extend outside of them in interesting directions too...so, welcome!
    Robcore, unfortunately there are a lot of quacks in the US/Europe "practicing" Ayurveda, but have you ever consulted an Ayurvedic physician? Unless you actually see an Ayurvedic Vaidya (physican) who has obtained at least a BAMS degree (preferably MD though) from an accredited Ayurvedic college in India (preferably one of the Government colleges), you will likely not have an accurate understanding of your particular doshic type. The MD (Ayu) degree takes at least 8 years to complete, and additional experience after that is preferred. 80% of Indians currently use Ayurveda in one way or another.

    I always thought I was a pure Vata (similarities to ectomorphism), but after I met with several Vaidyas, who examined me and took my pulse, I found out I was a Vata-Pitta, and this makes a world of difference. You need to actually speak with one of these people to get at the truth. Few people are totally one dosha or the other, but generally, one is either Vata, Vata-Pitta, Pitta-Vata, Pitta, Pitta-Kapha or Kapha-Pitta, Kapha, or rarely, Vata-Pitta-Kapha (evenly balanced). Each of these types has specific dietary regimens and so on, but again, only a qualified Vaidya can tell you what you need.

    But thanks for the welcome! Hopefully we will have some interesting discussions! Good to know people have similar interests.

    Quote Originally Posted by OrionzRevenge View Post
    Welcome to the forum.

    I'm completely ignorant of Ayurveda, but as a rule I think all traditional medicines should be researched using modern western clinical methods.

    Just this past week came news that an Anglo-Saxon eye infection salve killed 90% of the MRSA Staph bacteria that were exposed to it.

    This could very easily translate into lives being saved in the near future. Where antibiotics have failed and people are literally being eaten alive by MRSA bacteria.

    I became a believer in the effectiveness of some G-Jo (Acupressure) techniques back in the early 1980s. As pinching that sweet spot in the upper lip instantly negates muscle cramps in the lower leg. (My personal anecdote with a number of converts, with similar testimonials, will attest). This is certainly an area where Western Medicine needs to find an explanation for the effectiveness of said. Thus far they haven't.

    At the same time however when the Science says there is no basis for its effectiveness, then this should be given every consideration. For example, there is nothing in Rhino Horn that you wont find in human fingernails, so if you buy into some effect then chew your nails and don't create a market demand for the last surviving Rhinos.

    Anyways, Well met.
    Enjoy your time at the forum.
    Thanks for that article...very cool stuff. Some of those old remedies really put our modern treatments to shame. I do agree with you that wherever possible, modern scientific methods should be used to assess traditional remedies. This fits quite well for targeting pathogens, but unfortunately it's next to impossible to assess the effectiveness of Ayurvedic treatments using clinical trials. It is possible to do case studies on individuals, and they are being done, but for them to work, these studies cannot be randomized or even controlled for...making them "junk science" in the west. To assess an Ayurvedic treatment protocol, for instance, you would have to choose a group of people with fairly identical doshic types and disease etiologies. Then you would have to administer a whole series of interventions, not just one. These would have to include diet, exercise, meditation/counseling, herbs, massage, purgation, etc. Too many variables to control for. So it's been a dilemma for quite some time how to scientifically legitimize some of these older systems, but ultimately the real value in Ayurveda is just the basic philosophy of it, and that's something I think would appeal to many INTPs, especially with our bent towards individual investigations. Thanks for the welcome!

    Quote Originally Posted by Sappho View Post
    I'd hazard the guess that many INTPs are of the Kapha type, though not all of us are pronouncedly rotund.
    Really? Why do you think this? My current hypothesis is that INTPs lean more towards ectomorphism, and kapha is distinctly endomorphic...
    Last edited by NotThinDennis; 04-03-2015 at 09:42 PM.

  7. #7
    Sysop Ptah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatDennis View Post
    My interest has mainly been in Eastern religions and philosophy like Buddhism and Hinduism. After having read about the Vedic religion, I have become a convert of the Law of Karma, and I do believe in reincarnation. I find the idea of the universe being ruled by cause & effect not only in the gross physical world but also in the more subtle spiritual plane to be extremely appealing. For me, it explains why some people are born in abject circumstances and others not...it is their karma (no luck or misfortune, just the inevitable result of the sum total of all their actions and those of others in past lives). In this worldview, personal responsibility is of the utmost importance, and I like the fact that their is no heaven or hell except the one we create for ourselves, and this can extend well beyond our present lives...
    I'd be interested in hearing/discussing more of your thoughts on the relationship between the relevance/importance of free will in the context of reincarnation and karma, sometime. One of us should start a thread, as such

    Perhaps related, further on how you relate the perspectives of modern science/technology to the aforementioned "traditional" approaches to remedy.

    Also, I'm curious what you'd have to say about Abrahamic religions, as in contrast to the religions/beliefs you've mentioned, for instance.

  8. #8
    fluff2fluff GnarlFox's Avatar
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    I'd be interested in knowing more about what believers in reincarnation and karma think about how they're applied. The ideas seem really abstract while they'd have to be very specific in application.
    The idea is quite.

  9. #9
    Retired NotThinDennis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GnarlFox View Post
    I'd be interested in knowing more about what believers in reincarnation and karma think about how they're applied. The ideas seem really abstract while they'd have to be very specific in application.
    Hmm...why would they have to be specific in application for them to be useful?

  10. #10
    Retired NotThinDennis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ptah View Post
    I'd be interested in hearing/discussing more of your thoughts on the relationship between the relevance/importance of free will in the context of reincarnation and karma, sometime. One of us should start a thread, as such

    Perhaps related, further on how you relate the perspectives of modern science/technology to the aforementioned "traditional" approaches to remedy.

    Also, I'm curious what you'd have to say about Abrahamic religions, as in contrast to the religions/beliefs you've mentioned, for instance.
    Those are some big topics, but thanks for the encouragement ...I will think about starting some threads about that...they are great ideas...the first topic you mentioned is fairly philosophical...but would be an interesting discussion. The second is highly complex...but well worth discussing also...the last I actually don't know very much about Abrahamic religions aside from what I was taught in Sunday school growing up Catholic. But my overall impression so far is that the Church itself does not live up to the ideals that Jesus preached...not saying there aren't a lot of great priests and monks out there, but I'm not sure Jesus, if he were alive today, would be happy with what he saw...

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