Page 1 of 9 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 83

Thread: California Drought

  1. #1
    dormant jigglypuff's Avatar
    Type
    xxxx
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    zone 10a
    Posts
    5,755

    California Drought

    post articles or just talk about it.

    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/l...407-story.html

    http://www.latimes.com/visuals/graph...htmlstory.html

    ^ this link has a map showing proposed water restriction goals for each city in LA. where i am it's about 20 - 25%

    they should just ban golf courses imo.

    how are you adapting?

  2. #2
    Mens bona regnum possidet ferrus's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Barcelona, Catalonia
    Posts
    5,669
    Quote Originally Posted by jigglypuff View Post
    they should just ban golf courses imo.
    I don't disagree these are wasteful, but the main issue is the kind of agriculture used in the area. And, this has a lot to do with eating habits the world over and population size.
    Die Logik ist keine Lehre, sondern ein Spiegelbild der Welt. Die Logik ist transcendental. - Wittgenstein

  3. #3
    dormant jigglypuff's Avatar
    Type
    xxxx
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    zone 10a
    Posts
    5,755
    Quote Originally Posted by ferrus View Post
    I don't disagree these are wasteful, but the main issue is the kind of agriculture used in the area. And, this has a lot to do with eating habits the world over and population size.
    yeah, i wanna learn more about this. i know agriculture and certain foods like almonds suck up a ton of water ("it takes a gallon of water to grow a single almond") & that any water restriction plan would likely "go easy" on agriculture.

    i'm interested in any informative articles/reading recs about this in particular.

    i still think golf courses are ridiculous (not just in CA). same with meticulously landscaped yards that aren't, like, desert plants, which would be the only thing that makes sense here.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,154
    I'm not doing much to adapt. I already don't water our lawn or wash my car, which is better than most folks around here. So long as I see sprinklers going in the bay area I have no intention of changing the way I live.

    I'm not sure what the state should do about agriculture. Farms are already not getting as much water from the state as they have in the past. They are making up for it by drilling their own wells, which in turn dries up the wells of people living in the area. But if they have water rights to their land, I think they are free to drill and pump as much water as they want. Perhaps that is a flaw in the system that needs to be fixed. I think a lot of folks think the state should just hang farmers out to dry, but I think that's kind of short sighted, and I don't think people understand how much the country benefits from a cheap food supply. OTOH, it wasn't all that wise to plant a bunch of crops in such an arid part of the country in the first place. I think jacking up water prices is a good idea, and I think bans on watering lawns, washing cars in your driveway, and filling/topping off private swimming pools should be put into place. So far what they've done out here is better than what they did in NC when we had a drought: they basically took everyone's water usage from the previous year, cut off 25%, decided that should be everyone's new baseline, and charged a ridiculous surcharge if you went over that. So if you were using 1000 gallons/day, you now got 750 before you had to pay surcharges. If you were already conserving and using ~50 gallons a day, you now got 37.5. What if you just had twins or something? Too bad! That was shitty for a lot of people.

  5. #5
    dormant jigglypuff's Avatar
    Type
    xxxx
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    zone 10a
    Posts
    5,755
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...oryId=91363837

    Audubon International estimates that the average American course uses 312,000 gallons per day. In a place like Palm Springs, where 57 golf courses challenge the desert, each course eats up a million gallons a day. That is, each course each day in Palm Springs consumes as much water as an American family of four uses in four years.

  6. #6
    DOA Space Invaders Champion Neville's Avatar
    Type
    Taur
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    exile
    Posts
    3,579
    There's a thread on reddit about this right now.

    http://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comment..._shortages_in/
    “Then there you lie like the one warm spark in the heart of an arctic crystal.”

  7. #7
    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
    Type
    INtP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Shambala Road
    Posts
    3,274
    Quote Originally Posted by starla View Post
    ... OTOH, it wasn't all that wise to plant a bunch of crops in such an arid part of the country in the first place. I think jacking up water prices is a good idea,....
    Spoiler: I'm reminded of Sam Kinison's take on famine in Africa: You live in a FUCKING DESERT!


    Now, poor Africans can't really just pick up and leave, but everyone that went to Cali should have known and should have to pay.

    I think the ultimate answer is Desalination of Pacific Seawater.

    Wiki

    Economics

    Costs of desalinating sea water (infrastructure, energy and maintenance) are generally higher than the alternatives (fresh water from rivers or groundwater, water recycling and water conservation), but alternatives are not always available. Achievable costs in 2013 range from 0.45 to 1 US$/cubic metre (2 to 4 US$/kgal). (1 cubic meter is about 264 gallons.)
    The cost of untreated fresh water in the developing world can reach 5 US$/cubic metre.[21]
    Area Consumption USgal/person/day Consumption litre/person/day Desalinated Water Cost US$/person/day
    USA 100 378 0.29
    Europe 50 189 0.14
    Africa 15 57 0.05
    UN recommended minimum 13 49 0.04
    It's not really astronomically expensive and you could use Solar Power or Tidal Power to do it. (Wind is not green for the birds & bats)
    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

  8. #8
    Minister of Love Roger Mexico's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    New World
    Posts
    3,240
    INTPx Award Winner
    Quote Originally Posted by jigglypuff View Post
    post articles or just talk about it.

    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/l...407-story.html

    http://www.latimes.com/visuals/graph...htmlstory.html

    ^ this link has a map showing proposed water restriction goals for each city in LA. where i am it's about 20 - 25%

    they should just ban golf courses imo.

    how are you adapting?

    Well, I don't live there anymore, so I'm honestly "adapting" largely by reveling in Schadenfreude.

    God does not want most of California to be inhabited, or at least not by any settled urban/agricultural type of civilization. The more I learned about the process of intensive settlement there over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries, and how this relates to the region's natural ecology, the more I came to the conclusion that the state of California is some kind of mass-scale living enactment of ancient myths like those of Faust, Prometheus, and Daedalus. (i.e. folkloric traditions that emphasize the risks of hubris in the embrace of humanity's potential to creatively reshape the natural world)

    My Americorps assignment in Marin was basically at the long dangly end of an obscure tendril of FEMA that is entwined with tendrils of the BLM and the National Park and Forest Services. (We were doing fire and flood prevention and theoretically would have been called out to do light search and rescue if there had been an earthquake.) Pretty edifying, actually.

    For instance, things like this happen because the whole San Francisco metropolitan area is built in the middle of a mixed forest/grassland biome which is so naturally fire-prone that the native forests actually evolved to incorporate periodic burnoffs as a crucial component of their succession process. A number of people expressed the opinion that even having firefighters there is kind of a Sisyphean endeavor--any season where you successfully prevent a given area from burning is really more like a deposit made into a bank of accumulated fuel that will make any fire that does break out there in a subsequent season that much bigger and more dangerous. Of course, it's a nice cherry on top of all this that back in the 70's the highway department planted all that broom for roadside erosion control, and its aggressively invasive reproduction couples nicely with its height and fibrous composition to become an ideal "ladder fuel" as it colonizes the understory. One of the more recent big fires when I was there was blamed on a guy who had been illegally running a lawn mower out of season--a fairly large area including a couple of housing developments had been lit up because his blade struck a rock without him noticing it. So basically the decision to have a major urban area there in the first place is a bit like saying "hey, this straw-filled barn looks like a great place to have our barbecue".

    Then there's the Fault and the earthquakes, of course. Last I heard, the city authorities in San Francisco are basically expecting new construction of major buildings from here on out to include springs in the foundations, since if they can't eventually come up with a whole city full of buildings that don't fall down in Richter 8+ earthquakes the whole place is Officially Fucked. (There's a 98% of such an earthquake striking at some point within the next 30 years.)

    Something I learned to find hugely amusing (especially now that I don't live there anymore), is that there are locations sprinkled throughout the state where the construction of residential or commercial settlements was heavily subsidized by the government, only to have it turn out that these places are basically parasitical sinkholes consuming far more than their share from the budgets of emergency service agencies that respond to natural disasters of various kinds.


    It's like the state motto should be:





    So, now the whole state is running out of water?

    Look, sorry, everybody, but to me that is mostly just extremely fucking hilarious.


    My Advice?


    Pray for Rain.


    Last edited by Roger Mexico; 04-09-2015 at 06:27 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ptah View Post
    No history, no exposition, no anecdote or argument changes the invariant: we are all human beings, and some humans are idiots.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Spartan26's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1,368
    I definitely need to get in the shower sooner after I turn it on. I don't really have a lot of other options to conserve.

  10. #10
    dormant jigglypuff's Avatar
    Type
    xxxx
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    zone 10a
    Posts
    5,755
    @Roger Mexico
    are you capable of sharing knowledge without sounding like a smug asshole?

    not everybody who lives in CA is rich white people in SF and not everybody has the privilege to leave when shit hits the fan, so think outside your demographic ffs

    it’s not "hilarious" that people are running out of water. now i'll get to the actual info in your post later once the shit smell clears a bit from it

    edit: the opening sentence that goes "first of all, i am a huge dick" just colored my perception of the rest of the post a lot. hahaha. it's over, ok
    Last edited by jigglypuff; 04-09-2015 at 06:32 PM.

Similar Threads

  1. Plan to Split California into Six States
    By Osito Polar in forum News, Culture & History
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 02-22-2014, 01:47 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •