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Thread: Have you ever seen a corpse?

  1. #1
    a fool on a journey pensive_pilgrim's Avatar
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    Have you ever seen a corpse?

    If so, how did it make you feel? Also, do you want your body to be buried after you pass, and did seeing a corpse have any effect on your feelings in this matter?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Starjots's Avatar
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    At viewings yes, those relatives that have gone before. Also once as a kid while we passed a traffic accident, which makes me pretty sheltered on the subject.

    As far as burial, that's the tradition in the family and I'm good with that. It's a place for the living to go should they ever choose to do so.

  3. #3
    non-canonical Light Leak's Avatar
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    I've only seen them at viewings/funerals. They never look like the person to me. They look like a wax figure of the person, so I don't really feel much of anything looking at it. If it were up to me I'd probably choose to be cremated. This has nothing to do with seeing a corpse at a funeral. Just it seems like a waste of space and money to have all these bodies buried in graveyards. But if my family would rather bury my body it's not like I'd care because I'd be dead.

  4. #4
    The Experience Catoptric's Avatar
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    My next door neighbor's kid OD'd on heroin. I recall the forensics detectives popping out a bag from their trunks and head to their house in the early morning hours. When I approached the casket I could barely glance at it and cried as I walked away. I tend to believe that circumstances and interactions play our courses in life, and that things could always be different; if just one second were to played out differently. Perhaps it's like the "butterfly effect"? He basically hooked up with a dumb bitch from school (the supplier) and I suspect many knew of his habits (though I think it's one of those dumb parenting habits of ignoring the reality while trying to put on a good image of being a "parent")

    I missed my maternal Grandpa, and paternal Grandpa's funeral; and one of my "step-uncle's" (whom had just completed a successful litigation against the Government in the cause of death for an helicopter accident) all from cancer or complications with immunity from chemo. Another step-uncle was the son of my step-mom and had oral cancer from chewing tobacco (the other one smoked cigars though had an inoperable tumor--strangely his mother had a tumor on her thyroid gland that they suspected to have reduced her to a state of "complete batshit insane"-- and an IQ that was considered "off the charts") which eventually caused him to become somewhat emaciated with liquid dripping out of his mouth. She ended up moving to the location in Arkansas where he had a barbershop and was prepared at the funeral home. She had a closed casket in spite of a prepared body (that would have still been suitable for viewing) though in spite of these instructions she and I, along with this man's son were the only ones to open the casket prior to being carried off to a location further out, to a chapel they have always known. When the casket lid was lifted I swear it had a strange gust of air (probably from the body decomposing and giving off gases.) For some reason in spite of the sad circumstances and my step-grandmother crying and trying to touch his body for the last time (it was almost like she was reaching out but restraining her hand, while patting him on the face and chest), and I generally wanted to stay "strong" in those circumstances. Though I am normally resolved to remain stoic in such circumstances, I secretly tend to feel much stronger than most people do. . .

    It's rather intriguing that the casket was being escorted by Police because he had served for the Police for a brief time, which is normally reserved only for Police that die in duty (much like the military has for Officers that die in duty and use special ceremonies with military aircraft; the step-grandfather whom died years before my Dad had married was a Shriner, brigadier general, and had this attorney step-uncle whom was a former secretary to the Attorney General in Texas get pissed off that he wasn't given this kind of ceremony upon his death; even knowing the odd loops and angles of the law). In truth it might be the result of narcissism and special privilege (attention seeking). Either way it was pretty amazing to see the procession of the hearse and how the Police barricaded the highway upon entering the long stretch of road in Arkansas, leading the way with flashing lights (and no siren.)

    I forgot. . .

    Another time I was driving home from work and saw people lining both sides of the streets, with cars lined up. An SUV vehicle had a motorcycle lodges underneath the right tire and on the other side of the grass median was his blood caked into the road (that would remain with the painted outline for many months.)

    I was 6-7 when I went to Knotts Berry Farm and saw a ride where you loop around while moving up and down, and one of the kids (young teen) had fallen out of it; either due to the bars not holding down (I noticed something "peculiar" with them myself having ridden it just a few minutes before the incident) and he had fallen head first into the pavement (I didn't even notice the head) with a pool of blood all around him. I still remember he was wearing red Keds shoes, and I think blue shirt and black sport shorts or something. I only thought of it as an incident and wanted to go on another ride, even though I probably "knew" he was dead, death at that time meant very little to me. It didn't occur to emotion until I thought about my great grandma being dead about a year later. Even when my grandpa reminded me of my other great grandma, and that I should call her; and telling him no I didn't call her after she died. In really I never knew her and am unsure what I should say; the same reason that I explained to my step-grandmother, that if my father died, that I never really "knew" him. The same as the concept of knowing something and believing in it is largely a self-illusion.

    When I die, will I "feel" for my death? I do believe we are conscious; but being that our religions aren't particularly spiritual (and rather manipulative at that) I can't identify with the construct's of our cultural self-deception. Family likewise is more about embracing yourself and your own selfish survival. . . is it not?
    Last edited by Catoptric; 05-13-2015 at 04:12 AM.

  5. #5
    singularity precursor Limey's Avatar
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    I used to drive up to 1000 miles per week when I was a field engineer in the UK, so I saw a number of bad accidents on the road. The M5 and M6 motorways were pretty lethal at times. I once saw a semi/lorry carrying steel jackknife on an urban tight right bend on the M5, some poor bastard went right under the bed at full speed and was decapitated.
    When I was ten I saw a guy jump from a tower block, the asshole waited until we were being let out of school. He hit scaffolding near the bottom and came apart.

    With those, as with watching videos like those found on YNC (the "youth news network) website, it serves to remind me of how fragile and valuable life is and how easily and quickly it can be snuffed out.

    These things haven't affected my opinion on my own passing. I once thought it would be cool to be preserved, like an old Russian president, or a mummy, but lately I'm of the mindset that I would rather be converted back to carbon and cremated, with the ashes spread far and wide.

    I am in agreement with John Baskerville, I would not want to be buried in consecrated ground, I don't support superstition and want no part of it. That poor bastard didn't get his wishes granted as he's now in a churchyard catacomb, having been dug up to make way for a canal and the birth of the first industrial revolution.

  6. #6
    Yes, not infrequently. Part of work, though it never ceases to be a bit unsettling.

    Donate my organs if they're still worth anything. Burn the rest.

  7. #7
    凸(ಠ_ರೃ )凸 stuck's Avatar
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    Saw my mom's corpse in the hospice after she died of a long fight with cancer.

    I looked at it and said, out loud, "she's gone," and didn't have any feelings about the body after that. I was honestly glad to see her not suffer any more, her body had been a battleground for a long time. She was cremated. The hardest part about that had come about a year before. She had this beautiful urn made by a local artist to house her ashes- just one of those things you do in order to deal with mortality, I guess.

    Some people have to sit and meditate on death, I just kinda had it hover over our suburban house like an inversion layer throughout my adolescence.

  8. #8
    Sky Anvil Vison's Avatar
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    One at a viewing. The body looked fake and not at all like the person I knew, I found it... cathartic. There was a sudden knowing that they were gone now, that was the way of life, and that my tears were for me and that was okay.

    There was another body at a work place when I was a teenager. A women died during an accident, she was hit in the chest hard enough to collapse it. I witnessed her body long enough for the beginning of rigor to set in. She turned the most indescribable shade of blue. I learned a great deal about people that night, seeing their reactions and witnessing my own. I borrowed a smoke and told the on-site emergency counsellor that she provided a valuable service. I didnt intend to make her uneasy.

    None of this has had any effect on how I want my body disposed of, though I hope there is the possibility of a viewing if it will help my loved ones grieve.
    Oh fuck it, Its the 90's.

  9. #9
    It started with my dad, progressed to an already dead motorcyclist's legs I accidentally ran over going down I-5 in the middle of the night, and ended with at least a half dozen Chinese road accident victims. It could be more I stopped counting- not all at once but over the years. This isn't even the end, more of a lull.

    Life is just a fun little interstitial period between death and nonexistence.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Makers!*'s Avatar
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    [EDIT: I should not participate here.]
    Last edited by Makers!*; 05-13-2015 at 04:57 AM.

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