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Thread: INTP & management

  1. #1
    just dont think about it mhc's Avatar
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    INTP & management

    OK, there is a few reasons for me posting this thread. I know that INTPs might generally shun managing others, especially when it involves having to interact with them, so I want to know if anyone else here is involved in management. I manage a 'site' which obviously includes the people in it, and i would love to hear of challenges from others that might do something similar.

    i will start with that one of my most challenging parts of management is that it I find it takes me huge amounts of energy to have to deal with people. don't get me wrong, I do it well and my approach to it is well respected from my superiors, never the less i find dealing with ppl draining and i find myself having to 'act' in response to their own personal takes on what is actually happening in the workplace, while trying to direct them on a path inline with the business.

    The most frustrating part i find is that most people, men in particular, don't really like being told what to do, even when the path forward is obvious. I put this down to something along the lines of ppl need to feel like they are in control of what they are doing.
    Just look at the blue sky

  2. #2
    Faster. Than. Ever. Sloth's Avatar
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    I'm usually a department head on the projects that I work on, and have to manage a small team under me. I've been doing this for about 5 years.

    In the beginning it felt impossible at times, and that I'd never get any better at it because I too felt drained dealing with others and trying to convince them that the most logical way is the best way and so on.

    It gets better with practice and time, leaders are made not born, as they say.

    Some things that have worked for me:

    Completely let go of ego - empower people, put people "in charge" of things rather than "telling them" to do stuff. The language you use when delegating is really crucial. Instead of starting sentences with "I want" try "We need to ... can I put you in charge of that?" basically share your power (but always be mindful not to give off the sense that you don't think you should be in charge, that takes practice).

    Avoid micro managing as much as possible, and that will also help ease having to deal with people (as they will be more pro-active and not need to check in with you as much, if this doesn't always work it's because some people are just terrible workers and are stupid, as I progress in my career the people who work beneath me are much more on top of things). Always try to share the larger goals with the team (but be careful to not overwhelm them), pay attention to how the people on your team react, and try to assign things according to who is interested in doing what first (and always be paying attention to what people's skills and weaknesses are so that you can factor that in when delegating tasks). If you assign someone to something that they're terrible at, they're going to get burnt out faster than when they do something they're good at (sometimes you have no choice, so keep that in mind when you're forced to do that, and pay attention to when they might need a break from something).

    In short, a happy team is a productive team. Your team feeds off your "vibe" so much more than you realize, so when you start to feel a bit overwhelmed from all the people interacting, try to find something that can pull you back into a good mood.

    I also found this book to be very helpful (though some of it is dry and applies only to certain types of business leadership so I skipped through some of it). The most useful part of it I felt was a chapter about the importance "emotional environment" of my team, and how ignoring it (as an INTP I tended to heavily in the beginning) can be extremely destructive to the team. It lays some concrete tips on how to maintain it in a professional manner (it's business after all, it isn't like you need to hug them or anything, but forgetting to remind them that they're appreciated can be very detrimental).



    Hope that helps.

  3. #3
    just dont think about it mhc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sloth View Post
    Completely let go of ego - empower people, put people "in charge" of things rather than "telling them" to do stuff. The language you use when delegating is really crucial.
    Totally agree. I found an effective way to put this into practice, and in fact its something that i do quite naturally really, is to keep ideas/objectives in focus and at the forefront of all motifs. And as long as you 'feel' as part of the team working on the ideas or objectives, 'I want' naturally turns to 'we need' without conscious effort.

    being an intp, obviously time management is high on my agenda of keeping in check! (also, i think it infuriates some of my colleagues that not only do i show up to work sporadically inconsistently, and consistently late, but that it is accepted )
    Last edited by mhc; 08-14-2015 at 10:14 AM.
    Just look at the blue sky

  4. #4
    Faster. Than. Ever. Sloth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhc View Post
    (also, i think it infuriates some of my colleagues that not only do i show up to work sporadically inconsistently, and consistently late, but that it is accepted )
    eek!

    I'm atypical to the INTP stereotype about laziness and hours put in (at least in the sense that I almost always put in more hours than people on my team, but I'm "lazy" in the sense that I take a lot of short cuts, anyway). Our weakness is our ability to emotionally engage, but I can't stress enough how helpful it is when you take the time to put yourself in your team's shoes, and look at a situation from their standpoint. A resentful team can sabotage your work. So be careful out there!

  5. #5
    Faster. Than. Ever. Sloth's Avatar
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    Last night I was reminded of this thread because of an exchange @Sinny and I had where I brought up leadership.

    I remember the first time this thread went around, I replied and that was about it lol. As many of us know, the INTP has the deck stacked against them temperament wise for leadership. This doesnít mean itís impossible, it just means we have to approach our leadership development differently from the other types.

    So I thought about making a useful list of tips for INTPs that want to develop leadership skills, as an INTP who deals with these challenges:


    1. Youíre working with humans, not computer programs. As INTPs itís natural for us to want to find some universal logic that applies to everything, but it just doesnít work with humans (I wish it did). People have different abilities and tolerances. What one person might be fine with will be demoralizing for someone else. Donít allow yourself to get frustrated when you see someone isnít as good at something as you want them to be, make the best of it, theyíre a human. Youíll also find that people will improve over time if youíre patient with them.

    2. Be their ďfriendĒ as much as you can stomach it. I put that in quotes because I donít mean to literally try to be their friend, or give them an impression that youíre actually trying to be their friend. As INTPs we canít be fake, and we hate disingenuousness, so never ďbe fakeĒ. Instead capitalize on the small things you genuinely feel. For instance when someone on your team makes a joke, if you find it even remotely funny or clever, give them a ďHa!Ē and a smile. Never fake anything, your team will see right through it, we just arenít built to be fake so donít try. If you find yourself with a real asshole on your team, and really dislike them, keep things light and use your sense of humor to keep the work flow going. Youíre there to do a job, not get into a stupid arguments about nothing with someone you don't like

    3. HIRE THE RIGHT PEOPLE. I canít stress that enough. There are certain personalities that just arenít going to respond to your personality. When you interview people itís important to be constantly assessing the benefit/disadvantage ratio that each person brings to your team. For instance: you may get a better product out of someone with less experience but has a lot of passion, as opposed to someone with a lot of experience but has a terrible attitude. The former can be taught to be better, the latter is stuck that way. If someone is pushing you around in an interview, regardless of their experience, donít hire them, they already think theyíre too good for you and youíll never gain their respect (no matter what you achieve). Hire people you get along with (and are qualified enough, obviously).

    4. Smile. Your team is so much more sensitive to your emotional state than you could ever imagine (or that they're even consciously aware of) remember, you're working with humans. Us INTPs can sometimes come across a little too serious and heady for a lot of peopleís liking. We know that weíre just nerdy goofballs on the inside (itís those damn INTJs that are the real serious pantsí), but it can be hard for people to pick up on that when they first meet us (especially since weíre often a little shy). The best way to signal to your team youíre in a normal emotional state is to smile at them as much as makes sense to (when shit gets serious or someone royally fucks up, you have to play that by ear).



    Thatís all for now, I also partially wrote this just for myself to look back on when I want to punch someone in the brain :P

    Thereís a lot more to be said, especially about when things get difficult. Maybe Iíll add more at a later time.

  6. #6
    Faster. Than. Ever. Sloth's Avatar
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    Welp, seems about right that this would have just sunk to the bottom again without replies. Lols.

    I thought of 2 more things (and think that’ll be it for a while unless for some reason something happens that makes me think of something else). I wanted to say something about the positives the the INTP brings to leadership:


    5. Your strengths are epic when channelled properly. So don’t forget to continue to develop them. You very well may be the best problem solver in the room, but no matter how you slice it, it’s just going to take time to improve these weaknesses. Don’t accidentally lose the edge of your natural strengths in that process though. I’ve found at the end of the day, if shit really hits the fan, people find it comforting to hear their boss talking logically instead of emotionally (I think because they’re probably freaking out on the inside themselves and don’t need any more emotions thrown at them) so it helps that we comfort ourselves with logic naturally all the time anyway. A lot of other types have to develop this, but we already have it.


    6. Be patient with yourself. It’s going to feel impossible at first (which is why I think a lot of INTPs give up on it). If you’re really patient with yourself, patience for your team will necessarily follow too (it can be a challenge to be patient with the humans at times). We’re so much better at picking up on all kinds of other things, so why bother developing this? Well, because of #5, we have some great strengths. Plus it’s very spiritually enriching to go outside your personality comfort zone. It’s worth powering through so you can achieve some really cool things. Like everything in life, it takes practice, but you will eventually get better at it if you keep trying. I promise!



    ****Also to add on to #4: as I said in #2 it's impossible for us to be fake, so how are we supposed to smile Sloth? Well, use your creativity. Dig deep, there is always something to smile about if you think about it enough, even if that thing is simply "Hey I'm employed, good for me!"

  7. #7
    TJ TeresaJ's Avatar
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    Already sent a rep, but I just want to add that I really do appreciate this thread. Part of working as a nurse, even as an entry level nurse, is delegating tasks/managing others. This is one of the