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Thread: NaNoWriMo

  1. #21
    Homo siderius Sistamatic's Avatar
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    Nanowrimo -- my annual reminder that I'm incapable of fitting another thing into my life.

    Edit: it occurs to me that my bitterness about this is hilarious given that I have just finished writing a book with my neighbor. On the last self-editing pass now, and then it's off to our test readers for comments, probably by the end of the holiday season (we have plenty of test readers already, fyi.)
    Insults are effective only where emotion is present. -- Spock, "Who Mourns for Adonais?" Stardate 3468.1.

    I'm not avoiding socializing I'm helping socializing avoid me! --MoneyJungle

  2. #22
    Mens bona regnum possidet ferrus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sistamatic View Post
    Nanowrimo -- my annual reminder that I'm incapable of fitting another thing into my life.
    Maybe it should be your incentive to flesh out the details of your escape plan to an isolated log cabin.
    Die Logik ist keine Lehre, sondern ein Spiegelbild der Welt. Die Logik ist transcendental. - Wittgenstein

  3. #23
    Homo siderius Sistamatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferrus View Post
    Maybe it should be your incentive to flesh out the details of your escape plan to an isolated log cabin.
    I think I could do nanowrimo in a week if I could isolate myself from people, responsibilities, and the internet. Maybe I should commit a crime and get put in solitary. Do they provide paper and pencil in solitary?
    Insults are effective only where emotion is present. -- Spock, "Who Mourns for Adonais?" Stardate 3468.1.

    I'm not avoiding socializing I'm helping socializing avoid me! --MoneyJungle

  4. #24
    Senior Member Starjots's Avatar
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    After four false starts I've got 900 words and a decent beginning.

  5. #25
    Homo siderius Sistamatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starjots View Post
    After four false starts I've got 900 words and a decent beginning.
    Sweet! You are doing better than me. I have an intriguing premise, and I like my characters, but I have no clear direction. I may just have to write as far as my headlights and see where it takes me. I'm trying something weird and writing with a pen--an s pen on a 12 inch tablet, but still not typing. It engages a more creative part of my brain I think. Or maybe it's just a placebo thing.
    Insults are effective only where emotion is present. -- Spock, "Who Mourns for Adonais?" Stardate 3468.1.

    I'm not avoiding socializing I'm helping socializing avoid me! --MoneyJungle

  6. #26
    Aporia Dysphoria Dirac's Avatar
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    I am so rusty because I haven't been writing enough recently. It takes me much longer to get in the zone than it used to.

  7. #27
    Dr.Awkward Robcore's Avatar
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    Am I a fraud if I set out to write a novel, having read maybe just 4 novels in the past 16 years (3 of them were assigned reading, actually...)?
    Pretty much everything I've read in the last 2 decades has been non-fiction, or a religious text that may or may not be fiction, save for some graphic novels and screenplays.

    I'm writing my book mostly in First Person Present tense...and a lot of people seem to really hate that tense. To me, it seems natural...a format that I read all of the time in places like this forum, and on facebook and such...
    In any case, I did a quick search for popular first-person-present tense novels and am considering having a read through a few that come with good recommendations (hopefully that's not just a way to procrastinate).

    So far, I'm thinking 'The Time Traveler's Wife', which supposedly does a good job of transitioning seamlessly between first person present tense for 2 main characters...which is good, because I'm doing something similar, hopping between narrative perspectives, while maintaining the first person present telling...

    Any recommendations re: great first-person present-tense reads are welcome.
    ...the origin of emotional sickness lay in people’s belief that they were their personalities...
    "The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong." ~Carl Jung

  8. #28
    No Thank You
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    I just read this article. The thing that stuck out to me is that you can hire someone to write a 3,500 word book for you, on any subject, for about $22.

    So I had this idea of getting someone to write a generic recovery memoir about eating disorders or bpd or whatever, and then I'd rewrite it sentence by sentence, fitting my experiences into each paragraph. The goal would be to stretch the truth as little as possible. In the end I'd end up with something fictional, cliched, stereotyped, and nefariously produced, but also deeply personal. It would be like a reverse-ghost-written novel; in this case, the ghostwriter is the original storyteller, and you're the final transcriber. I don't know why this appeals to me and I wouldn't actually do it but I like playing with the idea.


    Anyway, I got a trial of Scrivener (it's really cool! Highly recommended!) so I might give this a shot even though it's a bit late. I want it to have something to do with diving bell spiders.

  9. #29
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robcore View Post
    Am I a fraud if I set out to write a novel, having read maybe just 4 novels in the past 16 years (3 of them were assigned reading, actually...)?
    Pretty much everything I've read in the last 2 decades has been non-fiction, or a religious text that may or may not be fiction, save for some graphic novels and screenplays.

    I'm writing my book mostly in First Person Present tense...and a lot of people seem to really hate that tense. To me, it seems natural...a format that I read all of the time in places like this forum, and on facebook and such...
    In any case, I did a quick search for popular first-person-present tense novels and am considering having a read through a few that come with good recommendations (hopefully that's not just a way to procrastinate).

    So far, I'm thinking 'The Time Traveler's Wife', which supposedly does a good job of transitioning seamlessly between first person present tense for 2 main characters...which is good, because I'm doing something similar, hopping between narrative perspectives, while maintaining the first person present telling...

    Any recommendations re: great first-person present-tense reads are welcome.
    Not so much a fraud as undereducated on the forms. To write a novel well, you need to know how novels are written--or rather, how a good novel reads. Your intuition that writers read a lot is, to the best of my knowledge, correct.

    On the issue of first person perspective, initially it seems like an easy perspective to write from, because it's the one we commonly write from in correspondence, but in the long haul, repeated words start to rear up and get noticeable, and for some reason, capital "I"s stick out more than lowercase pronouns.

    On the issue of using a present tense, don't. It's a bad idea and you'll run into trouble toot sweet. It seems logical to use, as you want the flow of action to seem urgent, but in practice, past tense seems to work out just fine--and better.



    "I walk to the store. A man approaches me, and as he approaches, I see his hand slip under his coat. My heart is racing and time slows for a moment, as does my pace. I wonder if he notices.

    His hand comes out of the coat and I see the flash of a knife. It's not a big knife, but it's big enough. His mouth is moving but I can't make out what he's saying over the drumming of my heartbeat. It doesn't matter, I already know what he wants. He wants the USB stick in my pocket. He wants the codes. That's what he wants, but he's asking for my money in exchange for my life.

    I watch his hand. It's steady and sure and covered with small healed injuries. His third knuckle has an abrasion that has yet to heal, and his nails need trimming. The knife looks more pointy than sharp, but pointy is plenty.

    I turn on the ball of my leading foot. It's a dance step. It's literally a dance step, and I remember delighting in the feel of it when I learned it. Now it's less delightful and more desperate and I perform it better than I've ever performed it before. I'm launched by the rebound and smoothly accelerate into a sprint in the opposite direction, away from the point of the knife."


    vs.


    "I walked to the store. A man approached me, and as he approached, I saw his hand slip under his coat. My heart raced and time slowed, as did my pace. I wondered if he noticed.

    His hand came out of the coat and I saw the flash of a knife. It's wasn't a big knife, but it was big enough. His mouth was moving but I couldn't make out what he said over the drumming of my heartbeat. It didn't matter. I already knew what he wanted. He wanted the USB stick in my pocket. He wanted the codes. That's what he wanted, but he asked for my money in exchange for my life.

    I watched his hand. It was steady and sure and covered with small healed injuries. His third knuckle had an abrasion that had yet to heal, and his nails needed trimming. The knife looked more pointy than sharp, but pointy is plenty.

    I turned on the ball of my leading foot. It's a dance step. It's literally a dance step, and I remember delighting in the feel of it when I learned it. Here it was less delightful and more desperate and I performed it better than I've ever performed it before. I was launched by the rebound and smoothly accelerated into a sprint in the opposite direction, away from the point of the knife."



    Both are highly readable, but the former is a bit more exhausting. It's also more exhausting to write and sooner or later, you run into uncertainty about how to word things. I could actually word things better than I did for the past tense version simply because I was using the past tense, but I kept the editing minimal to simplify comparison.
    Last edited by Hephaestus; 11-08-2015 at 08:31 PM. Reason: Anatomy anomaly.
    Every master plan has one overarching contingency that will be required for success: desenrascanço. In light of this, it is tempting to skip the planning phase and just make desenrascanço your master plan. I don't recommend this, but it has worked out for me in the past to an alarming degree. The problem is it keeps you too focused on the short term to ever improve your situation in the long.
    --Meditations on Uncertainty Vol ξ(x)

  10. #30
    <3 gator's Avatar
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    I'm ploughing ahead, though the past two days my wordcount has been shit because I've been working on job applications. But sacrificing wordcount to find a better job is worth it.

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