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Thread: Yo Whitey, Has Obama made you more Racist?

  1. #1
    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    Yo Whitey, Has Obama made you more Racist?

    This past Sunday on CBS's Face The Nation they did a segment where they talked about the Trump Phenomenon, or as I like to think of it: The Sinister Trump-Clinton dog & pony show. Wherein they showed a Focus Group of Trump supporters a video detailing the huge number factual inaccuracies in the Donald's Demagoguery. They then offered segments from members of the Focus Group where they were steadfastly entrenched in their support for the Hair-nado.

    They then engaged in a typical round-table with the typical sort of talent they ask to sit in. From The Transcript:

    JAMELLE BOUIE, CBS NEWS POLITICAL ANALYST: That's not true at all having watched the focus group. And I -- I actually hesitate to say whether it's ever been true of any candidate ever. I mean people's partisan attachments are pretty much immune to truth and fact and -- and so on and so forth. No one -- very few people look at collect information and then make a decision. They've made a decision based off, you know, reasons of tribal belief, reasons of -- all sorts of beliefs, and then they look for the information to justify it.


    And one real quick thing I want to say about the panel, or -- or the -- the focus group, is that my inner social scientist saw basically a living representation of something that many sociologists have been noting over the course of the Obama presidency, which is a distinct rise in racial resentment and anti-black attitude in the wake of both 2008 and 2012. So among all groups, all -- all -- all groups of, you know, white democrats, white independents, white Republicans, especially among white Republicans, there's been an increase in racial resentment, which is sort of a -- a measure social scientists use to determine a person's attitudes about African-Americans in particular, but other groups.


    Trump's supporters show all the hallmarks of people with high levels of racial resentment. They are -- you know, they seem -- a good number believe that President Obama is un-American or may -- maybe even a Muslim and connected to -- to terrorist. A good number refer to him as arrogant and elitists, which for myself reads very much like uppity (ph), as -- as a -- as an old insult towards African-Americans who have achieved -- achieved some sort of stature in mainstream society. And so all these things, I see in that focus group and connect back to real hard data we have about the change in racial attitudes.
    Jamelle Bouie is a Staff Writer for The Slate and liberal rags often seek him out to apply this sort of spin.

    The fact is people of all stripes and all skin-tones, from around the planet, see Obama as arrogant. When historians have the honest distance of the future to do so, Obama's arrogance (My way or the Highway) attitude will be noted as the principle reason his presidency was unremarkable overall.

    Obama's election in 2008 and again in 2012 is a celebration of racial progress in the US. Unfortunately too many are like Bouie and too willing to cheapen this milestone with racial demagoguery and sensational plays of the race-card for a few votes more. Shame on them. True Egalitarians need to be willing to call BS BS. Irrespective of the sources ethnic background.
    IMO

    Any Idea about where this "real hard data" that Bouie speaks of can be found?

    I'm sure it will be the same sort of Dangerous Social BS as well.

    To answer the Question posed in the OP of myself.
    Well I've often, here & elsewhere, been accused of being racist
    but I'd say I'm the one bringing the facts & rational arguments... not the slander.
    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

  2. #2
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    I think black people demanding to not be executed in the streets have caused a racist reaction. I don't think it has to do with Obama.

  3. #3
    malarkey oxyjen's Avatar
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    www.lmgtfy.com "racial attitudes in america" 5 seconds of effort
    Over the years since the 1997 edition of Racial Attitudes in America was published, the survey record on trends in racial attitudes shows improvement, stagnation, or declines, depending on the dimension of racial attitudes on which one focuses. The principle-implementation gap largely persists, though two of the implementation questions that continue to be included on surveys show an interesting disengagement with the issue—that is, increasing percentages of respondents opt not to answer the question, instead saying they have “no interest” in the issue. On questions of government expenditures and preferential treatment, whites are stagnant: there is little change in levels of support, and in general there is rather lukewarm support, if not outright opposition, to the kinds of policies and programs presented by these survey questions.

    Questions of social distance and stereotyping show perhaps the clearest signs of improvement: fewer and fewer white Americans readily endorse statements that blacks are less intelligent and hardworking than whites; and fewer verbally object to increasing levels of inter-racial mixing in neighborhoods and in marriage partners. These trends must be interpreted with caution, for they may reflect at least to some extent changes in social norms about what kinds of answers ought to be reported on surveys rather than changes in actual levels of stereotyping and in openness to living with and marrying African Americans. Studies that use increasingly sophisticated measurement approaches that can disentangle the possible explanations for the pattern of changes are certainly warranted. This might include the use of experiments within surveys, the further development of measures of unconscious stereotyping, as well as in-depth qualitative studies of racial attitudes. One might interpret this pattern of changes to reflect quite strong changes in racial norms (Schuman et al. 1997) that now apply to questions of this type. That is, it may no longer be acceptable to admit to these kinds of attitudes in a semi-public setting like a survey interview. This in itself reflects a change in racial attitudes in this country even if it does not reflect changes in the hearts and minds of Americans. What the implications of this change are, however, is subject to interpretation.

    Finally, there are a set of questions that have become less racially liberal over time. Specifically, questions that ask whether African Americans continue to experience racial discrimination and if the consequences of past discrimination and slavery continue to shape the experiences of today’s African Americans. Essentially, the trend is for fewer whites to acknowledge that African Americans are adversely affected by past and persistent discrimination. This trend is of consequence, since support for policies targeted toward helping African Americans are closely related to whether or not an individual believes that African Americans continue to face these kinds of barriers.

    General Summary of African American Racial Attitudes

    On many of the dimensions of racial attitudes that our long-term surveys have tapped, there has been little change in African American attitudes. This was true when the 2nd edition of the book was published, and continues to be true today. To some extent, the lack of change is because of the high levels of agreement with the racially liberal position that had already been reached, especially on questions related to the principles of racial equality and social distance. At this point in time, for many questions, white attitudes have “caught up” with black attitudes. However, on questions related to implementation, affirmative action, and explanations of inequality, the black-white gap persists. African Americans are more likely than whites to support race-targeted policies (e.g., implementation of equality, government expenditures, and preferential treatment). And they are also to a much greater extent likely to perceive that African Americans face substantial structural barriers in American society. Despite this racial gap, it is also the case that in recent years there is some evidence that this gap has narrowed—a narrowing caused by African American respondents becoming less likely to perceive discrimination and more likely to oppose some kinds of racial policies. In other words, African American attitudes are moving in a direction that brings them slightly closer to white attitudes. Methodological limitations of these national survey data make it difficult to know how to interpret this somewhat conservative turn. First, because of small sample sizes in any given year of the survey, it is unfortunately not possible to tell whether there are subgroups in the African American population that are more likely to have shifted attitudes than others.

    Second, and perhaps more importantly, there is the persistent challenge of race of interviewer effects. We know that African American respondents interviewed by white interviewers for some (though not all) racial questions tend to give different answers (e.g. Davis 1997; Krysan and Couper 2003). Typically the effects run towards more conservative responses when an interviewer is white.

    Beginning in 1988, the ISR surveys have provided information on race of interviewer, which allows us to determine what percentage of African American respondents were interviewed by white interviewers. There have been slight variations over the past several decades in these levels, but African American respondents across all years are overwhelmingly likely to be interviewed by white interviewers (with a range of 83 percent to 99 percent). On the one hand, given the persistently low race-matching of interviewer and respondent, one might conclude that any changes over time in actual responses could not be explained by race of interviewer, since the racial mis-matching between respondent and interviewer has been essentially unchanged. However, this pattern, taken together with the trends we observed for the attitudes of white respondents on these kinds of questions (e.g., a declining recognition of discrimination), raises a concern. That is, the racial climate (vis-a-vis whites’ attitudes) in which African Americans are answering these questions has changed in a direction of being less sympathetic on these particular issues. It is possible that the effect of being interviewed by a white interviewer has become greater over time—so that even a stable level of non-matching of interviewer and respondent may have a different impact in the contemporary racial climate where whites are decreasingly sympathetic to the idea that discrimination persists. The conservative trend in African American attitudes, then, could be a result of the greater consequences of race mis-matching rather than being entirely due to a more conservative turn among African American respondents. To be sure, more complete studies with greater numbers of African American respondents are necessary to test this and other hypotheses about the current state of African American attitudes.



    REFERENCES

    Davis, D. 1997. “The Direction of Race of Interviewer Effects Among African-Americans: Donning the Black Mask.” American Journal of Political Science 41: 309-22.

    Krysan, M. and M. P. Couper. 2003. “Race in the Live and Virtual Interviewer: Racial Deference, Social Desirability, and Activation Effects in Attitude Surveys.” Social Psychology Quarterly 66(4): 364-383.

    Schuman, H., C. Steeh, L. Bobo, and M. Krysan. 1997. Racial Attitudes in America: Trends and Interpretations, Revised Edition. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

  4. #4
    Hasta Siempre Madrigal's Avatar
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    Uhhh, Ozzy, I really have not registered Obama being considered "arrogant" by anyone outside the US. At least in Latin America he was quite well-liked for a while as some kind of people's president, until he gradually claimed the underwhelming title of "just another US president" in most people's minds.

    To these republicans, Obama's problem is that he's an eloquent and measured black man who talks neither like a cowboy nor like your crazy uncle that you see at Christmas. That anti-intellectual populism exists in both parties, but an uptight white guy that uses more than monosyllables wouldn't raise an eyebrow.
    Everything under heaven is in utter chaos; the situation is excellent. - Mao

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    Mens bona regnum possidet ferrus's Avatar
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    I don't think because Obama. Maybe because Jon Stewart or JayZ. But definitely because Donald Trump.
    Die Logik ist keine Lehre, sondern ein Spiegelbild der Welt. Die Logik ist transcendental. - Wittgenstein

  6. #6
    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oxyjen View Post
    www.lmgtfy.com "racial attitudes in America" 5 seconds of effort
    Interesting math.

    5 seconds to fetch a 12 year old study referencing 19 year old studies.

    Bouie:"many sociologists have been noting over the course of the Obama presidency, which is a distinct rise in racial resentment and anti-black attitude in the wake of both 2008 and 2012"

    If you don't buy into Bouie's tripe then the implication is that you can't be critical of THIS president without being racist.
    I'm looking for specific evidence that this isn't flipping the Race Card from the bottom of the deck.
    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

  7. #7
    malarkey oxyjen's Avatar
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    https://www.splcenter.org/fighting-h...ement-explodes

    ok five more seconds. I didn't fully read that one though, but the stats are more recent. I do think the economy downturn and mortgage crisis provides a lot of kindling for resentment that people (i.e., media) were more than happy to blame on Obama.

  8. #8
    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oxyjen View Post
    https://www.splcenter.org/fighting-h...ement-explodes

    ok five more seconds. I didn't fully read that one though, but the stats are more recent. I do think the economy downturn and mortgage crisis provides a lot of kindling for resentment that people (i.e., media) were more than happy to blame on Obama.
    I'll probably in short order post a thread wherein your link will provide a meaty source of material to rebut. I would note that the Obama folks probably cringe when you bring up hysteria about the "Patriot" movement dated 2012. Because this is the year that Obama political operatives in the IRS intentionally & systematically denied groups with that word in their name, or mission statement, 501c status. Thus denying the fueling of grass-roots support for the GOP.

    As for using using the SPLC List/Map of hate groups as a measure of social ills, the biggest problem where I live in central NC is the large number of Black Separatist Muslim Hate Groups.
    https://www.splcenter.org/hate-map
    Creativity is the residue of time wasted. ~ Albert Einstein

  9. #9
    malarkey oxyjen's Avatar
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    Yeah, they talk about them in the link I posted. That with the IRS/Obama aside you put in has nothing to do with the original data point at hand, so I'm guessing you just want an outlet to get all weirdly partisan. I'll pass.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Senseye's Avatar
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    Per @oxygen, it didn't take me long to google up some data. It does appear "racial resentment" attitudes have been on the rise during the Obama administration. But it's not clear if this is due to Obama being black, or due to the fact Obama is a Democrat, and Republican voters tend to be the demographic that polls highest on the racial resentment front. Probably a bit of both.

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