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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #11
    <3 gator's Avatar
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    Recently finished A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. A bit of a slog at times, mostly because there's no good place to put it down, and no good place to pick it back up again either.

    It made me really glad to not be Catholic, mostly because due to esprit d'escalier I'd probably be eternally damned.

  2. #12
    Ciao for now jamesgold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scarydoor View Post
    I'm reading Great Expectations as part of an effort to get through all those classics. I'm considering giving up on this one. I'm 57% through and it's an absolute tedious bore. I'm not finding any value in it.
    I'd say don't bother with the classics if you don't get anything out of them. They're put on this high pedestal of "the epitome of reading" but goddamn they're such a bore.

    Then again, pretty much all fiction bores me nowadays.

    ...i don't read

  3. #13
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    I just started reading "The Man from St. Petersburg".

  4. #14
    schlemiel Faust's Avatar
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    Eh, still working on Mason & Dixon, but I picked up Island of Lost Maps: A True Story of Cartographic Crime, and my gf bought me the Bleeding Edge. I think I'll be busy for awhile.

  5. #15
    Member MacGuffin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gator View Post
    Recently finished A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. A bit of a slog at times, mostly because there's no good place to put it down, and no good place to pick it back up again either.

    It made me really glad to not be Catholic, mostly because due to esprit d'escalier I'd probably be eternally damned.
    That one bored me, which was a disappointment.

  6. #16
    Member Aurast's Avatar
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    I'm reading The Forever War. I'm slowly chipping away at some top SciFi novel lists. I'll probably finish it today, I started it yesterday. Next up is The Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett.

  7. #17
    Member MacGuffin's Avatar
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    I'm rereading the Hobbit.

    It took me about an hour to get to Riddles in the Dark. WTF Peter Jackson?

  8. #18
    Senior Member Starjots's Avatar
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    First Book: An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth by Chris Hadfield - bought this as a present and decided to read before wrapping. As an INTP, the guide part of the book was a bit depressing. This guy is a detail freak and compulsive achiever. Fortunately he's a likable detail freak and compulsive achiever. I'd type him a ESTJ. Then again it never hurts to hear that show up, sweating the small details and aiming to be a zero (my translation, you must be a follower before you can be a leader). These are good things. And be hyper-comptetitive - still not sure about that. It is too painful to consider that one closely.

    Which sounds like I'm a bit down on the book, but I'm not because what it excels at it filling in all the details of everyman's childhood dream of being an astronaut. The author spends a lot of time telling you how about his journey. It wasn't a one-off event, it was a life time goal diligently worked at. Then it gets better, he tells you what it is like being an astronaut with lots of interesting little details. Somewhere along the way you pick up why having astronauts in space right now is important. So as an easy to read biography, I thought it was very good.


    Second Book: The War of Art by Steven Pressfield - A very short book that would have been better if the second half hadn't been written. Title is an obvious take off on the Art of War, which is quite amazing for what it is, a book about War (this is getting off track, but all the airport bookstore love of the Art of War as a business book creeps me out). The basic point is for creative types the biggest foe is internal resistance (book 1) and having the attitude of a professional is the solution (book 2). That's the part worth reading, though I got that much in one chapter of Steven King's excellent book On Writing.

    Just when I was fired up a bit along comes the second half explaining the author's personal whys of said simple approach which included angels and a lot of other spiritual stuff. I guess whatever works for you, but I thought it detracted from the message. And regards the title, this isn't written in parallel fashion with the Art of War. The message is much simpler and less nuanced - and that sort of reach for greatness by association is annoying.

    Overall brevity saves the book, I don't regret reading it and would recommend the first half to anyone who feels stuck in their aspirations for creation.

    Next in the queue is sic-fi, the Dreaming Void by Peter Hamilton.

    Has anyone read the latest Steven Hawking book? Is that worth reading?

  9. #19
    Senior Member Starjots's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gator View Post
    Recently finished A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. A bit of a slog at times, mostly because there's no good place to put it down, and no good place to pick it back up again either.

    It made me really glad to not be Catholic, mostly because due to esprit d'escalier I'd probably be eternally damned.
    This Joyce fellow, what is his deep message? I've attempted a few of his books with little success, giving up after a short while thinking 'wtf is this about?' But there is always that list pressure to try again.

  10. #20
    <3 gator's Avatar
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    Sometimes I wonder if the thing about Joyce, the reason why he's so famous is because his novels are really long and hard to get through, so most people don't. The people who manage to make it all the way to the end have to have something to show for the effort so they say it's a classic to try and justify the time they spent on it.

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