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Thread: Gardening & Botany Thread

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferrus View Post
    I'm thinking I might get a sago palm for my apartment in Barcelona.

  2. #12
    Dr.Awkward Robcore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sappho View Post
    Roses!
    All rose petals are edible, too. You can use them as a garnish, or to make a nice subtly flavoured tea, or you could make rosewater with 'em, which has a variety of uses.

    Slow going on my pomegranates so far, but there are two that have sprouted out of 32 planted, so far. Hoping that the rest pop by the weekend. Something like that indoor greenhouse would probably speed things us for me.
    ...the origin of emotional sickness lay in people’s belief that they were their personalities...
    "The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong." ~Carl Jung

  3. #13
    Senior Member Linnea's Avatar
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    The last I counted there are 30+ plants in the apartment. I need to get rid of the ones I don't like that much. Some are too big and I don't have a suitable place for them. The current selection can survive the low light levels of winter but some end up looking a bit scraggly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Robcore View Post
    All rose petals are edible, too. You can use them as a garnish, or to make a nice subtly flavoured tea, or you could make rosewater with 'em, which has a variety of uses.
    You shouldn't eat rose petals from store bought roses. They have probably been sprayed with something interesting you don't want to eat.

  4. #14
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    Had to throw out the Bellis perennis I sowed into peat pots because the only thing growing were thick layers of white, furry mould on the outside of the pots. So now I've reverted to using good old inorganic plastic pots:



    Left – Ocimum basilicum 'Genovese' (Sweet basil) <--- apparently the seeds turn from black to a light shade of blue after sowing – the more you know!
    Right – Bellis perennis (English daisy)

    And the apple tree has decided to wake from its slumber!



    The upper quarter of the plant shall be cut back soon in order to encourage ramification (which may or may not work...). I'm waiting for some rooting hormone to be delivered, as I intend to experiment with the cutting that will be taken (though I'm not very hopeful that it will actually root).

  5. #15
    Member rhinosaur's Avatar
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    At our new rental we have a lemon tree and a tangerine tree. In the past few days I've planted some tomatoes (bought as small plants), planted some garlic bulbs, and seeded some jalapeños, coriander, and cumin. Next up will be kale.

  6. #16
    Now we know... Asteroids Champion ACow's Avatar
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    Our cat/kitten is destroying our plants (almost totally destroyed a palm, several little succulents, and we've had to put the peace lilly outside because its poisonous).

    So, we're getting some help from these people for some cat proof landscapes, and we've got this thing for the balcony.

    Now...to populate it sometime...

  7. #17
    Homo siderius Sistamatic's Avatar
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    @ferrus I love sago palms. I live in a zone where you can have them outdoors. They are my predominant landscape feature. Some of them are 50 plus years old and 10-15 feet tall. So easy to care for.

    We have one of these too.


    It's about 3x as tall as the house, and sort of stands there out of place amongst the oak trees. Our house is 66 years old and the original owners died of old age, so I don't know it's story or which of the Washingtonia species it is...but I know it is cold hardy to 18F at least, so that narrows it down. Raccoons love to shimmy up it, so that's cool. I think they enjoy the fruits. Warblers like to hang out in it in the winter.

    We lost all our hibiscus. It only got down to 27F this winter, but it got freakishly cold for here the 3 preceding winters, and we lost a whole lot of decades old established landscaping. I'm pretty heartbroken over some of it. In addition, there is a fungus sweeping through the area ... it killed our oh so beautiful japanese maple () and it seems to have gotten into some of the azaleas that were weakened by the consecutive colder than normal seasons. I think I've found something that kills it, but I hate to spray poisons in the yard. We have a lot of wildlife. I found some disease in the privet hedge yesterday, so I'm thinking I may say fuck it and just spray everything. We have a fuckton of privet. It's probably 50 years old, around 20 feet tall and surrounds three sides of the back yard. I think there may be a fence inside of it, but I can't be sure. Either way, I can't let it die.
    Insults are effective only where emotion is present. -- Spock, "Who Mourns for Adonais?" Stardate 3468.1.

    I'm not avoiding socializing I'm helping socializing avoid me! --MoneyJungle

  8. #18
    Dr.Awkward Robcore's Avatar
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    transplanted a red huckleberry bush from the forest to the yard and placed it in a hugelkultur...I think it will work well, since I found the plant growing on a sloped bit of ground among some rotting wood and the roots of a cedar tree. I recently came across the concept of hugelkultur, and it seems to be a great method for developing high quality soil. If I can manage to develop the soil so that it's as rich as what I saw in the forest I'll be thrilled. My property also gets a lot of water, so I think hugelkultur mounds and rows will be an ideal landscaping treatment since they allow plants to effectively manage their hydration and root development.

    I also have about 15 pomegranate seedlings germinated now...and soon I'll probably get to start hardening them by putting them outside for a few hours a day. I saw a video tour of some dude's permaculture garden on Youtube, and while poms usually like a ton of sunlight, his was thriving in a section of dappled shade. That said, he was also in Florida, so I expect it was probably hotter than it will get here...but eh, it gives one hope to see plants thriving in conditions that they aren't said to thrive under.

    I have a First Nations friend who has promised to take me out some time this spring to show me what sorts of plants can be foraged in the area around here...he's told me about this plant that the FNs call 'wild rice', though apparently it's a sort of root, and it tastes more like potatoes? anyhow, I'm hoping to get some good leads on some perennial edibles that I can transplant and possibly domesticate...should be fun...and then if I eventually start getting good yields, he'll trade me sockeye and halibut for fresh vegetables...another step toward self sustainability!
    ...the origin of emotional sickness lay in people’s belief that they were their personalities...
    "The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong." ~Carl Jung

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ACow View Post
    terraria
    Those look lovely! They remind me of this guy:



    Quote Originally Posted by Sistamatic View Post
    (...) We lost all our hibiscus. It only got down to 27F this winter, but it got freakishly cold for here the 3 preceding winters, and we lost a whole lot of decades old established landscaping. I'm pretty heartbroken over some of it. In addition, there is a fungus sweeping through the area ... it killed our oh so beautiful japanese maple () and it seems to have gotten into some of the azaleas that were weakened by the consecutive colder than normal seasons. I think I've found something that kills it, but I hate to spray poisons in the yard. We have a lot of wildlife. I found some disease in the privet hedge yesterday, so I'm thinking I may say fuck it and just spray everything. We have a fuckton of privet. It's probably 50 years old, around 20 feet tall and surrounds three sides of the back yard. I think there may be a fence inside of it, but I can't be sure. Either way, I can't let it die.
    Do you know what kind of disease it is? In Europe there is a profession named Baumdoktor (literally 'tree doctor') who can be consulted, and who will treat all ligneous plants for a fee. Their job description includes curing diseases, 'vaccinating' trees with harmless forms of fungi, and even practising orthopaedics for awkwardly grown trees/hedges.

    On an entirely different note, I recently came across this futuristic-looking flower (Osteospermum 'Pink Whirls') and it immediately reminded me of you:





    Quote Originally Posted by Robcore View Post
    transplanted a red huckleberry bush from the forest to the yard and placed it in a hugelkultur...I think it will work well, since I found the plant growing on a sloped bit of ground among some rotting wood and the roots of a cedar tree. I recently came across the concept of hugelkultur, and it seems to be a great method for developing high quality soil. If I can manage to develop the soil so that it's as rich as what I saw in the forest I'll be thrilled. My property also gets a lot of water, so I think hugelkultur mounds and rows will be an ideal landscaping treatment since they allow plants to effectively manage their hydration and root development.
    That's why I love INTPx – teaching me words in my native language I didn't yet know.

    Turns out Hügelkultur was invented by an Austrian! [cue a moment of patriotic pride] What a strange coincidence that the guy's last name is Holzer – an older form of the German word for logger/woodcutter.

    I also have about 15 pomegranate seedlings germinated now...and soon I'll probably get to start hardening them by putting them outside for a few hours a day. I saw a video tour of some dude's permaculture garden on Youtube, and while poms usually like a ton of sunlight, his was thriving in a section of dappled shade. That said, he was also in Florida, so I expect it was probably hotter than it will get here...but eh, it gives one hope to see plants thriving in conditions that they aren't said to thrive under.

    I have a First Nations friend who has promised to take me out some time this spring to show me what sorts of plants can be foraged in the area around here...he's told me about this plant that the FNs call 'wild rice', though apparently it's a sort of root, and it tastes more like potatoes? anyhow, I'm hoping to get some good leads on some perennial edibles that I can transplant and possibly domesticate...should be fun...and then if I eventually start getting good yields, he'll trade me sockeye and halibut for fresh vegetables...another step toward self sustainability!
    That sounds really cool. But give a man a fish...

  10. #20
    Dr.Awkward Robcore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sappho View Post
    That sounds really cool. But give a man a fish...
    lol, well once my garden is established, I hope it will be maintenance free enough that I have time to do my own fishing as well...but I doubt I'll be able to keep up with my FN friend who has a pretty large boat and nets, lol.

    As for hugelkultur, if you look it up, most of the examples in documents show a very very tall bed...but you can do it even on a slightly raised mound (mine is 8-12 inches above ground, and about 12 inches below, full of sticks and chunks of wood).

    This is the video that inspired my hugelkultur attempt. It is incredibly informative:



    part 2: https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j...16274245,d.cGc

    Part 3: https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j...16274245,d.cGc

    Follow up after a few months: https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j...16274245,d.cGc
    ...the origin of emotional sickness lay in people’s belief that they were their personalities...
    "The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong." ~Carl Jung

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