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Thread: Facts about Depression

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    Tawaci ki a Gnaska ki Osito Polar's Avatar
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    Facts about Depression

    Here's an interesting one. People who are suffering from depression have decreased perception of color. So, all that talk about the world seeming darker or everything appearing grey ... that stuff's literally true from the point of view of someone who's depressed.

    http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/07...ion/15826.html
    "I don't have psychological problems." --Madrigal

    "When you write about shooting Polemarch in the head, that's more like a first-person view, like you're there looking down the sight of the gun." --Utisz

    David Wong, regarding Chicago
    Six centuries ago, the pre-Colombian natives who settled here named this region with a word which in their language means "the Mouth of Shadow". Later, the Iroquois who showed up and inexplicably slaughtered every man, woman and child renamed it "Seriously, Fuck that Place". When French explorer Jacques Marquette passed through the area he marked his map with a drawing of a brownish blob emerging from between the Devil's buttocks.

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    Senior Member skip's Avatar
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    I wonder if it works the other way, does an environment absent of color make people depressed?
    Yes, I smell like a horse. No, I don't consider that a problem.

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    Minister of Love Roger Mexico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Osito Polar View Post
    Here's an interesting one. People who are suffering from depression have decreased perception of color. So, all that talk about the world seeming darker or everything appearing grey ... that stuff's literally true from the point of view of someone who's depressed.

    http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/07...ion/15826.html
    That's interesting. Saw something on TV about depression once that covered a radical treatment called Deep Brain Stimulation (they literally stick an electrode into your brain to directly pump current into under-stimulated regions of it), and showed a woman as she had her implant turned on. What she said was that "everything just got brighter."

    I've occasionally attempted to explain this to people who don't really get it. We're not talking about depression the emotion; depression the disease is something else entirely. It's not a question of feeling sad--in fact I probably experience sadness less often than a normal person does. It's more typically an issue of failing to feel something when I should be feeling it--whether sadness, happiness, anger, fear, excitement, lust, or anything else. Unhappiness frequently results from the effects of this, but unhappiness is not itself the physiological/psychological problem. I'm not lethargic or unmotivated because I'm sad--I'm unmotivated because the emotional rewards that should be motivating never arrive, or only arrive in a disappointingly muted form. I do seem to have developed some addictions less out of a felt need for the soothing or "medicating" effects of a drug than a tendency to crave sensory/emotional states of heightened intensity.

    It definitely works with pot--and probably I have, at times, essentially tended to self-medicate with it. Doing fun things high has always produced a sensation that I'm actually having fun, rather than merely being aware that I'm having fun in a more remote, theoretical way. I feel like I'm having the kind of fun that normal people have when they do fun things.

    I've heard there may be some evidence of an evolutionary explanation for all this--clinically depressed people are actually more emotionally resilient than neurotypical people in some situations, since things like unexpected changes in their environment or routine are less irritating and hence less disruptive to their normal mental processes. I've sometimes had a weird tendency to snap into a detached but hyper-lucid "robot" state in scary or aggravating situations, where I actually seem to become calmer and more rational compared to people who become less rational under the pressure of intense emotions. This kind of thing could have provided an advantage at times, particularly in groups where only a few people are like this, such that their lower functionality under normal and predictable circumstances might be offset by the benefits they provide to the group by remaining more clear-headed under extreme or surprising circumstances.

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    Merry Christmas Dot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skip View Post
    I wonder if it works the other way, does an environment absent of color make people depressed?
    That would explain Scandinavia.

    I wonder if color-blind people get depressed more often.

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    Senior Member Senseye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skip View Post
    I wonder if it works the other way, does an environment absent of color make people depressed?
    I think it does. Seasonal Affective Disorder and all that. Plus it's hard to feel down on a warm sunny day. Although if otherwise healthy, I doubt a grey day or two (environmentally speaking) will impact you too much one way or the other.

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    Senior Member skip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Senseye View Post
    Plus it's hard to feel down on a warm sunny day.
    I don't know, I find the desert oppressive and it's very sunny. Look at the difference between the colors here:



    And where I just came from:



    Quote Originally Posted by Senseye View Post
    Although if otherwise healthy, I doubt a grey day or two (environmentally speaking) will impact you too much one way or the other.
    True. I've always liked cloudy, rainy days but then most of the places I've lived don't have a lot of them so it's probably the novelty that I like.
    Yes, I smell like a horse. No, I don't consider that a problem.

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    Tawaci ki a Gnaska ki Osito Polar's Avatar
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    Hmm, well speaking as someone who suffers from SAD, it's not lack of environmental color that sets it off. It's specifically lack of sunlight. The day/night difference at northern latitudes seems to set it off during the winter.

    I love love love the desert in the US southwest, probably because it's nice and sunny.
    "I don't have psychological problems." --Madrigal

    "When you write about shooting Polemarch in the head, that's more like a first-person view, like you're there looking down the sight of the gun." --Utisz

    David Wong, regarding Chicago
    Six centuries ago, the pre-Colombian natives who settled here named this region with a word which in their language means "the Mouth of Shadow". Later, the Iroquois who showed up and inexplicably slaughtered every man, woman and child renamed it "Seriously, Fuck that Place". When French explorer Jacques Marquette passed through the area he marked his map with a drawing of a brownish blob emerging from between the Devil's buttocks.

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    Senior Member skip's Avatar
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    I'd trade it for some fog any day!
    Yes, I smell like a horse. No, I don't consider that a problem.

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    Hasta Siempre Madrigal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skip View Post
    I'd trade it for some fog any day!
    "The city is covered in fog. Can't even see the Obelisk."

    "Yaaaay!"

    "Madrigal, we work for an airline."

    "Oh."

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    dormant jigglypuff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skip View Post
    I don't know, I find the desert oppressive and it's very sunny. Look at the difference between the colors here...
    Quote Originally Posted by Osito Polar View Post
    I love love love the desert in the US southwest, probably because it's nice and sunny.
    the desert can be beautiful. because i'm lazy, i'm gonna quote my own photos. the palette of the US southwest is exquisite (i'm choosing to ignore the gray parts rn).

    Quote Originally Posted by tele View Post
    traveling through the southwestern US this past summer, utah-ish

    Spoiler: x


    it's hard to feel down when you're surrounded by landscape like that.

    i've always suspected that i have SAD to some degree but i guess everybody does. most of the time i hate overcast weather, especially when it's not raining and you can't even do fun rainy day stuff. i've thought that i'd probably benefit a lot from one of those natural light lamps / alarm clocks that are designed to help people through the winter.
    Last edited by jigglypuff; 01-08-2014 at 12:48 AM.

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