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Thread: LSAT Reading Comprehension Passages

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    Senior Member BarIII's Avatar
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    LSAT Reading Comprehension Passages

    I don't remember ever taking an online reading comprehension test. I want to try out a particularly hard one. I have no memory of any reading comprehension test I ever took. I found a list of someone's idea of the The 10 Hardest LSAT Reading Comprehension Passages Of All Time. I'm thinking "if it says it, how can I not get it?" I'm really curious about what's up with this. I'll actually resort to going to a library to look at one of these. Does anyone have an example of a particularly difficult Reading Comprehension Passage with questions? Something that would challenge members of this forum?
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarIII View Post
    I don't remember ever taking an online reading comprehension test. I want to try out a particularly hard one. I have no memory of any reading comprehension test I ever took. I found a list of someone's idea of the The 10 Hardest LSAT Reading Comprehension Passages Of All Time. I'm thinking "if it says it, how can I not get it?" I'm really curious about what's up with this. I'll actually resort to going to a library to look at one of these. Does anyone have an example of a particularly difficult Reading Comprehension Passage with questions? Something that would challenge members of this forum?
    I agree.

    The only reading comprehension tests I've come across were those you encounter when you learn foreign languages. In my opinion, they're simply a more sophisticated way of testing vocabulary. Back when I was teaching languages at least, vocabulary seemed to prove the biggest hurdle to comprehension for students.

    I've witnessed a similar phenomenon with teenagers first exposed to 18th/19th century German literature. It's their native tongue, so how could they not understand?! – Not to propagate stereotypes here, but again it was a matter of their personal vocabulary being more limited than that of the text.

    Just out of curiosity, Bar – have you ever read Shakespeare?

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    Senior Member BarIII's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sappho View Post
    Just out of curiosity, Bar – have you ever read Shakespeare?
    No, I've actually never read a full novel in my life. Closest I got was 3/4 of the way through in High School. I barely failed the test (that means I failed). I figured I'd have barely passed (passed) if I completed that last 1/4. I don't like reading. You get all the words in your head by watching TV without having to look down at a piece of paper, plus you get the action, so why read? You all really should stop with all your reading. I don't even read a newspaper but I check the news headlines several times a day and read an article sometimes. I've read various non-fiction but not regularly and not cover to cover. I'd rather write than read.

    Oh, I've tried to see if I could enjoy or at least appreciate on some level fictional writing. I took out a book of short stories by famous authors. I read part of a few and I thought they were bad. Same with poetry.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarIII View Post
    No, I've actually never read a full novel in my life. Closest I got was 3/4 of the way through in High School. I barely failed the test (that means I failed). I figured I'd have barely passed (passed) if I completed that last 1/4. I don't like reading. You get all the words in your head by watching TV without having to look down at a piece of paper, plus you get the action, so why read? You all really should stop with all your reading. I don't even read a newspaper but I check the news headlines several times a day and read an article sometimes. I've read various non-fiction but not regularly and not cover to cover. I'd rather write than read.

    Oh, I've tried to see if I could enjoy or at least appreciate on some level fictional writing. I took out a book of short stories by famous authors. I read part of a few and I thought they were bad. Same with poetry.


    I am now fully convinced you are an internet troll.

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    Senior Member Mike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarIII View Post
    I don't remember ever taking an online reading comprehension test. I want to try out a particularly hard one. I have no memory of any reading comprehension test I ever took. I found a list of someone's idea of the The 10 Hardest LSAT Reading Comprehension Passages Of All Time. I'm thinking "if it says it, how can I not get it?"
    It's a timed test. That's the challenge, getting it within the time limits to complete the entire test. And not only do you need to comprehend the passage, you need to comprehend the questions and the alternative answers to pick the best one.

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    Senior Member BarIII's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sappho View Post
    Bet none your books evoke that feeling. That's why I'd rather write.
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    Member Thoth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarIII View Post
    Bet none your books evoke that feeling. That's why I'd rather write.
    Will you pen how this:

    Quote Originally Posted by BarIII View Post
    I want to try out a particularly hard one. I'll actually resort to going to a library to look at one of these. Does anyone have an example of a particularly difficult Reading Comprehension Passage with questions? Something that would challenge members of this forum?
    And this:

    Quote Originally Posted by BarIII View Post
    You get all the words in your head by watching TV without having to look down at a piece of paper, plus you get the action, so why read? You all really should stop with all your reading. I don't even read a newspaper but I check the news headlines several times a day and read an article sometimes. I've read various non-fiction but not regularly and not cover to cover. I'd rather write than read.
    Present paradoxical paths of logic within the same contextual exploration? Why not do a video instead?

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    Senior Member BarIII's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thoth View Post
    ...
    I need to maintain my market value. I don't give away good writing. I'm thinking of asking for a small fee through Paypal for clarifying what I write on forums.
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    igKnight Hephaestus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarIII View Post
    I need to maintain my market value. I don't give away good writing. I'm thinking of asking for a small fee through Paypal for clarifying what I write on forums.
    As a non-reader, how do you know good writing? Get used to this question.

    Quote Originally Posted by BarIII View Post
    Bet none your books evoke that feeling. That's why I'd rather write.
    Your goal is to maximize the number of people who are embarrassed by your existence and belief system? Or you'd rather write than read because in reading you might come across criticism?

    This is a moderately difficult passage for most people--though the entire work that contains it much more so:

    Quote Originally Posted by Kant
    In all judgements wherein the relation of a subject to the predicate is cogitated (I mention affirmative judgements only here; the application to negative will be very easy), this relation is possible in two different ways. Either the predicate B belongs to the subject A, as somewhat which is contained (though covertly) in the conception A; or the predicate B lies completely out of the conception A, although it stands in connection with it. In the first instance, I term the judgement analytical, in the second, synthetical. Analytical judgements (affirmative) are therefore those in which the connection of the predicate with the subject is cogitated through identity; those in which this connection is cogitated without identity, are called synthetical judgements. The former may be called explicative, the latter augmentative judgements; because the former add in the predicate nothing to the conception of the subject, but only analyse it into its constituent conceptions, which were thought already in the subject, although in a confused manner; the latter add to our conceptions of the subject a predicate which was not contained in it, and which no analysis could ever have discovered therein. For example, when I say, "All bodies are extended," this is an analytical judgement. For I need not go beyond the conception of body in order to find extension connected with it, but merely analyse the conception, that is, become conscious of the manifold properties which I think in that conception, in order to discover this predicate in it: it is therefore an analytical judgement. On the other hand, when I say, "All bodies are heavy," the predicate is something totally different from that which I think in the mere conception of a body. By the addition of such a predicate, therefore, it becomes a synthetical judgement.

    Judgements of experience, as such, are always synthetical. For it would be absurd to think of grounding an analytical judgement on experience, because in forming such a judgement I need not go out of the sphere of my conceptions, and therefore recourse to the testimony of experience is quite unnecessary. That "bodies are extended" is not an empirical judgement, but a proposition which stands firm a priori. For before addressing myself to experience, I already have in my conception all the requisite conditions for the judgement, and I have only to extract the predicate from the conception, according to the principle of contradiction, and thereby at the same time become conscious of the necessity of the judgement, a necessity which I could never learn from experience. On the other hand, though at first I do not at all include the predicate of weight in my conception of body in general, that conception still indicates an object of experience, a part of the totality of experience, to which I can still add other parts; and this I do when I recognize by observation that bodies are heavy. I can cognize beforehand by analysis the conception of body through the characteristics of extension, impenetrability, shape, etc., all which are cogitated in this conception. But now I extend my knowledge, and looking back on experience from which I had derived this conception of body, I find weight at all times connected with the above characteristics, and therefore I synthetically add to my conceptions this as a predicate, and say, "All bodies are heavy." Thus it is experience upon which rests the possibility of the synthesis of the predicate of weight with the conception of body, because both conceptions, although the one is not contained in the other, still belong to one another (only contingently, however), as parts of a whole, namely, of experience, which is itself a synthesis of intuitions.

    But to synthetical judgements a priori, such aid is entirely wanting. If I go out of and beyond the conception A, in order to recognize another B as connected with it, what foundation have I to rest on, whereby to render the synthesis possible? I have here no longer the advantage of looking out in the sphere of experience for what I want. Let us take, for example, the proposition, "Everything that happens has a cause." In the conception of "something that happens," I indeed think an existence which a certain time antecedes, and from this I can derive analytical judgements. But the conception of a cause lies quite out of the above conception, and indicates something entirely different from "that which happens," and is consequently not contained in that conception. How then am I able to assert concerning the general conception—"that which happens"—something entirely different from that conception, and to recognize the conception of cause although not contained in it, yet as belonging to it, and even necessarily? what is here the unknown = X, upon which the understanding rests when it believes it has found, out of the conception A a foreign predicate B, which it nevertheless considers to be connected with it? It cannot be experience, because the principle adduced annexes the two representations, cause and effect, to the representation existence, not only with universality, which experience cannot give, but also with the expression of necessity, therefore completely a priori and from pure conceptions. Upon such synthetical, that is augmentative propositions, depends the whole aim of our speculative knowledge a priori; for although analytical judgements are indeed highly important and necessary, they are so, only to arrive at that clearness of conceptions which is requisite for a sure and extended synthesis, and this alone is a real acquisition.
    --Mention of these things is so taboo, they aren't even allowed a name for the prohibition. It is just not done.

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    Senior Member BarIII's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    As a non-reader, how do you know good writing? Get used to this question.
    I don't intend to apply for writing jobs so soon so I won't get that question from anyone who matters to me financially, but I will do query letters. I've received some interest in the past from a query letter for a magazine article. I ended up not writing it because it didn't sound enthusiastic enough but I'd write it today.

    I did get that question on another forum not long ago. It's partially based on my own analysis of what others write and what I write. I also did volunteer work involving writing (I was offered a job but didn't take it) and got good reviews by a couple of people whose opinions were respected. I wrote a poem in HS that was good enough that the teacher and students didn't believe I wrote it. They were polite about it and said I probably heard it somewhere and forgot. Various comments over the years from different sources. Etc.

    BTW, I hate poetry, even that poem I wrote. I found it a few years ago and I'm pretty sure I threw it out, and I'm pretty nostalgic.
    Last edited by BarIII; 09-14-2016 at 07:51 PM.
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