View Poll Results: How often are you self-actualized?

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  • Never in my life

    3 20.00%
  • A few times in my life

    3 20.00%
  • More of a yearly thing

    0 0%
  • It ebbs and flows over years

    4 26.67%
  • Constant state of self-actualization

    1 6.67%
  • Protest

    4 26.67%
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Thread: Have you achieved self-actualization?

  1. #11
    Scobblelotcher Sistamatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scarydoor View Post
    I don't know...

    I'm not sure I really understand the question. I have always felt a bit sceptical of the Maslow thing. Maybe I don't understand it properly. It seems too rigid, and placing the model before reality.
    I have been thinking for the last couple of hours about why this question ... I guess it has sort of been bugging me? (not a negative commentary on the thread...far from it...thought provoking is a good thing) Have I achieved self actualization? I don't understand the temporality of that. Is it something I retain once I have it, is it a state I'm supposed to exist in, or is it like asking a climber if he exists on a peak.

    I have amazing days and amazing accomplishments, and I have days when I don't feel like anything is working at all, and I have failed spectacularly so many times I've lost count, but all of that was part of the climb. Sometimes years slip by and it seems like I wasted them, but then I find myself in some better place as a result of how I was "wasting" my time. Life is a journey and sometimes the road fucking sucks and sometimes you feel like you don't know what direction you are supposed to be going, and that's normal. I'm 45 and I still feel that way. You might climb like hell for years to spend 5 minutes on top before it's time to go on to the next thing, and you might not even know what that next thing is until you meander into it. Are you only self actualized at the destination, but not during all the mistakes you had to learn from in order to even know to start on the hard shitty work it took to get good enough at what you wanted to do to kick ass at it?
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  2. #12
    TJ TeresaJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sistamatic View Post
    I have been thinking for the last couple of hours about why this question ... I guess it has sort of been bugging me? (not a negative commentary on the thread...far from it...thought provoking is a good thing) Have I achieved self actualization? I don't understand the temporality of that. Is it something I retain once I have it, is it a state I'm supposed to exist in, or is it like asking a climber if he exists on a peak.

    I have amazing days and amazing accomplishments, and I have days when I don't feel like anything is working at all, and I have failed spectacularly so many times I've lost count, but all of that was part of the climb. Sometimes years slip by and it seems like I wasted them, but then I find myself in some better place as a result of how I was "wasting" my time. Life is a journey and sometimes the road fucking sucks and sometimes you feel like you don't know what direction you are supposed to be going, and that's normal. I'm 45 and I still feel that way. You might climb like hell for years to spend 5 minutes on top before it's time to go on to the next thing, and you might not even know what that next thing is until you meander into it. Are you only self actualized at the destination, but not during all the mistakes you had to learn from in order to even know to start on the hard shitty work it took to get good enough at what you wanted to do to kick ass at it?
    Nursing schools love Maslow because it makes it easy to prioritize. The patient is lonely, anxious, wracked by self-doubt, and severely sleep deprived. What problem does the nurse address first? Sleep, because sleep is a physiological need. It's at the bottom of the pyramid. That's the stuff you tackle first, then move up the pyramid (anxiety, then loneliness, then self-doubt). Next question.

    That makes sense to me. I'm ok with that. Most of the focus so far has been on the bottom of the pyramid anyway: Oxygen, nutrition.

    But now I'm taking this gerontological nursing course - not that this is the height of philosophical thought on the subject. But anyway they have whole slides on self-actualization, as in, "Heads up - this is something that mature people could be engaged in, and this is what it looks like."

    I don't know if it's just for the symmetry of flipping Maslow upside down. I don't know if it's for the sake of having more to talk about, more to fill out this class. Here's a sample slide:

    Self-Renewal
    Commitment to beliefs
    Connecting to world
    Times of solitude
    Episodic breaks from responsibility
    Contact with natural world
    Creative self-expression
    Adaptation to changes
    Learning from down times
    Clearly to me those are behaviors that any spiritually healthy person engages in, to some extent. And again, I would suspect that this would come most naturally to intuitives.

    I wonder if this is something that other types attain with age, or if the whole idea of transposing the hierarchy onto a life stage development model is totally bunk.

    And then you have the unwell-heightened creativity phases that @scarydoor mentioned...

    Just food for thought.
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  3. #13
    Member Guess Who's Avatar
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    Maslow's hierarchy is also big in the education field. The bottom three tiers of his hierarchy are pretty clear while the top two are less so. Are they a veiled expression of materialism? ... 4) achieve a degree of material success and take pride in this success and 5) become so wealthy and powerful that you escape the daily struggle and no longer need to concern yourself with relationships with other people.

    Maslow's hierarchy never appealed or rang true to me.
    Last edited by Guess Who; 05-24-2017 at 06:48 PM.
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  4. #14
    Senior Member Senseye's Avatar
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    Kinda, sorta, maybe.

    I've definitely got the basic needs down. The others, it's hard to define. I don't think you can take the words in the chart to literally. I'm not sure what achieving my full potential means. It's sounds like a lot of work. Can a life of kicking back and relaxing = realizing my full potential? If so, I am in good shape. One has to watch out for SJ's defining the standard others should measure up to (which is kind of the default due to majority rules). Naturally, those buggers want to work their ass off for all sorts of status achievements before they die. They can fill their boots, but it's not for me.

    Needless to say, the whole relationships business could use some work (I'm INTP, duh) but I'd probably admit I could use some work there.

  5. #15
    凸(ಠ_ರೃ )凸 stuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guess Who View Post
    Are they a veiled expression of materialism? ... 4) achieve a degree of material success and take pride in this success and 5) become so wealthy and powerful that you escape the daily struggle and no longer need to concern yourself with relationships with other people.
    Yeah, valid criticism.

    I don't think there's simply nothing to it, however. Artists can be self-actualized while being mostly on the outside of the materialist world. I've felt very self-actualized during certain musical projects for which I knew wouldn't make any money, done during periods when I had an unrelated job.

  6. #16
    singularity precursor Limey's Avatar
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    It's like happiness itself, it's fleeting at best.
    We're lucky in our lives if we can have golden years, weeks of bliss, precious moments, magical seconds. The rest of the time is spent waiting or trying to make any of them happen.



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  7. #17
    Mistress Mischievous Lilith's Avatar
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    I have not and I am not certain if I will ever.

    It seems to me that 'self-actualization' is a Western equivalent of 'nirvana'. It's the concept of stability, of inner peace, of spiritual contentment.

    Well, as long as I have to worry about my bills, that concept is still remote.

  8. #18
    Member Garbage_Doll's Avatar
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    I think it's upside down.
    I think you start with pursuing your potential and acting on your creativity, and then everything else falls into place.

    That is just a theory because I am always stuck on the "love needs" section being that I'm perpetually single and not pleased about it. The idea of one having to be achieved to go up to the next level (or is that the idea) seems off to me too. Feeling accomplished is not that hard for me; but then there's that "love needs" section....

  9. #19
    Dr.Awkward Robcore's Avatar
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    I think that since it is a hierarchy of needs rather than of *wants*, it's pretty easy to be self actualized...I mean, I have as much freedom to pursue my highest potential as I need...which doesn't mean I particularly care to push myself that way...I'm more interested in leisure, thinking about stuff, learning, and just observing things...plus doing creative things now and then.
    ...the origin of emotional sickness lay in people’s belief that they were their personalities...
    "The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong." ~Carl Jung

  10. #20
    your cheapest wine Johnny's Avatar
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    It's time to take a stand for those of us awash in a state of incessant self-actualization.
    What's the difference? It's just soda, bro.

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