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Thread: Engineering.

  1. #11
    know nothing pensive_pilgrim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starjots View Post
    Interesting we don't have any MEs, CEs, or ChemEs so far.
    I think they get a lot more xSTJs, as well as smart xSTPs who like cars and rockets and stuff like that. NTs are drawn more to the abstract.

  2. #12
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    ChemE here. We're useless. Somehow I've stayed gainfully employed in the semiconductor industry for quite some time.

    Lots of women go ChemE, I've no idea why.

  3. #13
    Member Squishy's Avatar
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    This is pretty neat take on an improved combustion engine.


  4. #14
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    i'm an r&d engineer working with industrial ceramics (material science background). it's cool but most of our customers are not high growth like tech so, jobs are so-so. plus they make us sign non-compete agreements so, the prospect of leaving for a competitor is sketchy. otherwise i'd have to start on the bottom tier in another tech. it's not the type of thing you picture an engineer doing. i spent half my day today spraying refractory concrete on the wall. i've spent many a weekend convering product trials working nightshift in steel mills next to arc furnaces, crawling through cement rotary kilns, into coal boilers. that doesn't beat my office mate though, he had a product trial in a medical waste incinerator a couple weeks ago. you get the idea....industrial research in general is by no means sexy, but especially my field.

    i do want to do some independent research on my own when the timing is right (having my own home). i think i could build a killer molten salt electrolysis reactor given my ceramic background and prior experience. the problem with these is they are expensive to build and scale up but i have a good idea how to build an economical one for about 1/20th the cost.

    i should of did electrical engineering or computer science.
    Last edited by BillyBibbit; 11-04-2017 at 12:43 PM.

  5. #15
    Noble Asshole Horatio's Avatar
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  6. #16
    Pull the strings! Architect's Avatar
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    Software engineer, practically a EE though because of the work I do (scientific instrumentation)

    The surprising thing to me is how little the general public appreciates engineering, when most of what we do is interact with some engineering, and how much our world is shaped by it. Consider ...

    • You wake up in your engineered bed in your engineered house to your engineered alarm clock, in an engineered time zone
    • Brush your engineered teeth with your engineered toothbrush and paste, shower in your engineered water system, put on your engineered clothing
    • Eat your engineered breakfast
    • Transport in your (you get the idea)


    I don't understand why some people 'praise god' when they should 'praise us for making all of this' (I say us because the people that actually make the engineered stuff need praise too). My favorite quote


  7. #17
    Pull the strings! Architect's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squishy View Post
    This is pretty neat take on an improved combustion engine.
    That's interesting. A variation on the Wankel engine I believe, my brother had one in his RX-7. A problem with those designs is the difficulty of getting a good seal, a piston and its rings works so much better, anyhow we've never gotten the design to work as well as piston based ICE.

    It's a good example though of trying to make a bad technology work better. Internal combustion engines (ICE) is inherently a bad design, we only do it because the energy density of gasoline is so high. But you use pistons to create circular motion (inefficient) by exploding gas (inefficient) creating poor torque response (inefficient) requiring a complicated transmission (inefficient) and in the end need a complicated cooling system to remove all the waste heat you made (inefficient).

    I bought a Chevy Bolt - all electric battery electric car. I'm getting 300 miles/charge and am loving the instant and enormous torque I get - ICE cars are so mushy. Its practically silent too.

    Quote Originally Posted by starla View Post
    ChemE here. We're useless. Somehow I've stayed gainfully employed in the semiconductor industry for quite some time.
    All the chem engineers I knew went into the Oil industry, didn't know semiconductors was an option.

  8. #18
    Member Squishy's Avatar
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    Heh, I'm not a mechanical engineer, but I wondered if sealing would be a problem. Seems like any wear on one piston would amplify leaks due to the pistons being on the same spool. And that would just exacerbate more problems.

    Electric cars are awesome though. A lot less maintenance and lot more torque, as you've seen. I'd like to buy a Tesla if they can come out with the model S at the price range they are shooting for. But I've been reading it's more likely to cost around $45,000 with all the normal features. I like the motor in this car.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pW85NjT_p4

    Supposedly, it ran a 0-60 in 1.94 seconds. That kind of torque sounds fun.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squishy View Post
    Electric cars are awesome though. A lot less maintenance and lot more torque, as you've seen.
    Maintenance is replacing the wiper fluid, rotating and replacing the tires. Oh and changing the cabin filter.

    I'd like to buy a Tesla if they can come out with the model S at the price range they are shooting for. But I've been reading it's more likely to cost around $45,000 with all the normal features.
    Yes and the rebates will probably run out before you can get a Model 3. Problem with Tesla is that they're still an immature car company, they use customers as beta testers. And as a tinter in Silicon Valley who has seen hundreds of them says "Like all good Tesla's this one as some defects". Also despite the hype I don't believe the Tesla engineering is all that good, we

    Supposedly, it ran a 0-60 in 1.94 seconds. That kind of torque sounds fun.
    Sounds nauseating, I don't even like my 0-60 in 6 seconds much.

  10. #20
    Member rhinosaur's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBibbit View Post
    i'm an r&d engineer working with industrial ceramics (material science background). it's cool but most of our customers are not high growth like tech so, jobs are so-so. plus they make us sign non-compete agreements so, the prospect of leaving for a competitor is sketchy. otherwise i'd have to start on the bottom tier in another tech. it's not the type of thing you picture an engineer doing. i spent half my day today spraying refractory concrete on the wall. i've spent many a weekend convering product trials working nightshift in steel mills next to arc furnaces, crawling through cement rotary kilns, into coal boilers. that doesn't beat my office mate though, he had a product trial in a medical waste incinerator a couple weeks ago. you get the idea....industrial research in general is by no means sexy, but especially my field.

    i do want to do some independent research on my own when the timing is right (having my own home). i think i could build a killer molten salt electrolysis reactor given my ceramic background and prior experience. the problem with these is they are expensive to build and scale up but i have a good idea how to build an economical one for about 1/20th the cost.

    i should of did electrical engineering or computer science.
    I have a grad school buddy at CoorsTec, making high-tech ceramics.

    My background is in Chemistry / Materials Science as well. I was making / helping to make thin films up until about 6 months ago. Now I make cleaning products. Technically it's the same industry (semiconductors) but my new job is not at all related to what I was doing before, and it's fine. I consider it a lateral move. Non-compete / NDAs are almost never enforced. Just don't go taking IP to a competitor.

    Half the time in this industry I'm amazed by how much I didn't learn in school. Professors are clueless.

    I thought about doing computer science instead of chemistry when I first started undergrad, but at the time I thought the job market would get saturated by the time I finished school. Obviously it didn't. However, I'm still glad I went with chemistry because I don't have to sit in front of a screen all day. For my job I can still dabble with scripting and relatively simple programs, so I still get some exposure to programming.
    Last edited by rhinosaur; 11-04-2017 at 05:48 PM.

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