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Thread: Gamification success

  1. #11
    Hasta Siempre Madrigal's Avatar
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    stiggy, you noob, repo's an oldie. (Unless you're concerned about what new members will think)
    Everything under heaven is in utter chaos; the situation is excellent. - Mao

  2. #12
    Member QuickTwist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by repo_man View Post
    Point taken (edit: no pun intended). Would you like to expand?
    I can't stick to anything for any amount of time. So even if I got it and it worked for a little while it wouldn't stick. Plus, I don't have a cell phone.

  3. #13
    Member repo_man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuickTwist View Post
    I can't stick to anything for any amount of time. So even if I got it and it worked for a little while it wouldn't stick. Plus, I don't have a cell phone.
    True, without the apps on smart phone the system does not work that well. It is important that one can tick off the tasks as soon as they are done. You are not always near a desktop computer to do that.

    To make the system "stick" it is advisable to start with the smallest possible step. One could try to find just one recurring task that can be tied to a reward. The change in behaviour may fuel itself and turn into permanent habit. After that it is easier to expand the system. I intend to gradually expand my system even more: most of the tasks now have to do with my private life and I want to bring more gamification to my work.

  4. #14
    Member repo_man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madrigal View Post
    stiggy, you noob, repo's an oldie. (Unless you're concerned about what new members will think)
    I find Stigmatica's comment helpful. Most readers won't know my posts in the distant past so I cannot expect to draw credibility from those posts.

    I inserted a warning in the beginning of the original post and I hope it helps.

  5. #15
    facta non verba interprétation erronée's Avatar
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    Op your avatar has a sapien looking mouth. As for your thread. Good for you.
    You write like a beautiful pear-shaped man with a voice that wants to be heard. I hear you John, ssh... *whispers* I hear you. *hugs John*

  6. #16
    Member repo_man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by interprétation erronée View Post
    Op your avatar has a sapien looking mouth. As for your thread. Good for you.
    Thank you for the simian perspective. I think apes could benefit from this system. They are known to change their behaviour to earn rewards. Obviously a human would have to set up and manage the system. Also, in this case rewards should be instantanenous from a banana or peanut dispenser - I don’t think apes have the patience the collect points that they would convert to treats later in the week.

  7. #17
    Member repo_man's Avatar
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    Good. Anyone else?

    @sappho? @gator? (hello gator) @pensive_pilgrim? @scarydoor? @bass_n_treble? @2hype?

  8. #18
    Noble Asshole Horatio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by repo_man View Post
    You are lucky to have such determination.
    I wish. In reality I'm probably just really intolerant about minor disturbances in my perceived world order. Same reason I can't stand messes.

    My philosophy is that a master task list will never be empty. There are always useful things we can do if we have some time. I can put half-baked or unimportant ideas onto the task list and later decide whether they should be assigned points or deleted. Some of my tasks have "DEFINE BETTER" text on them so that the first task is to refine them into more actionable form.
    That sounds like a good system.

    Or do you mean your to-do list gets cleared of tasks that are assigned to a particular day or week?
    Yes, that's it. Like you, I have a "master task list", or rather, several of them pertaining to different areas in my life (projects in Todoist terms). If a new chore comes up, I assign it a day right away (usually in the very near future). Same with individual project steps: I plan them out, put date stamps on them, and when the day comes around, I just do them.

    In my opinion, to-do apps are very good reminding us of recurring tasks twice a week, every month, every six months or whatever.
    Definitely. I've got recurring tasks set up for bill payments and household chores which I'd otherwise forget. It doesn't make those things more pleasant but it's a huge relief to know when they are going to get done.

    For my part, I don't always complete tasks that are due on a particular day. This is because I find it difficult to know in advance how much time and energy I will have each day. When I have more time on another day I can tick off those overdue tasks and collect the points.
    Yeah, I get that. I sometimes postpone stuff to the next day, too, but hardly ever to later than that. I find that this question helps: "When I'm done with this, will I be glad that I've already done it?" If the answer is yes, I'll usually pluck up the energy to do it right away, as such tasks tend not to get easier if you postpone them, anyway.

  9. #19
    know nothing pensive_pilgrim's Avatar
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    I think your system is cool but I wouldn't use it. I'm just not motivated by rewards that I give myself - too easy to cheat I guess. But I can't cheat my way to the intrinsic reward of having done something that needed to be done. I ignore the points system that Todoist comes with as well, but I do set a daily goal and try to meet that every day to keep my "streak" going, so I can't say none of this gamification stuff works for me. Usually I try not to get high until I've met my daily goal, and I try to increase my daily goal if it starts feeling easy to meet.

    I'm also on the same page with having a never-empty task list. I use the priority levels to distinguish things that actually need to get done that day. When I first started using Todoist, I only had a few items (which I highly recommend to anyone starting out, take it slow and get in the habit of just using the list), and when I completed them all it would pop up with this thing telling me to "enjoy my day" or something. That is just depressing.

  10. #20
    Member repo_man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pensive_pilgrim View Post
    When I first started using Todoist, I only had a few items (which I highly recommend to anyone starting out, take it slow and get in the habit of just using the list)
    I agree with this recommendation.

    Quote Originally Posted by pensive_pilgrim View Post
    I ignore the points system that Todoist comes with
    Todoist's own "Karma" points system does not distinguish between large and small tasks. That is why I don't find its reports that useful. If it could incorporate my point values for each task into its reporting, I think it could give good insights into when I have been productive. My own system cannot give much insight either: it merely reports how many points (minutes of game-time) I currently have available.

    Quote Originally Posted by pensive_pilgrim View Post
    I'm just not motivated by rewards that I give myself - too easy to cheat I guess.
    That is a profound issue, in my opinion. The reason I have been able to manage myself is that granting rewards and and enjoying rewards happen at different times. When I feel like playing computer games, my mind can come up with a thousand reasons why I have earned it or why this day counts as exceptional circumstances that warrant some game-time. The system dictates that at that moment I do not have the power to decide what I have earned. The system tells how many minutes I have available and the system will not listen to any excuses. It is a separate time when I plan my week or come up with a new project that I make decisions about what kind of tasks should grant certain amounts of game-time. During those planning moments I am not motivated to cheat myself because the expectation of immediate reward is not there to cloud my judgement. I think many people have these sober moments when they look back at their weak moments and realise how pathetic and self-serving their thinking was at the time. I have taken away my opportunity to make decisions at weak moments.

    EDIT: To put this in another way, with the help of information technology the rational man can finally outwit and triumph against his cheating irrational side. The advance of technology has brought many changes to our lives; why not this one? I accept that efforts against the irrational man may have failed throughout history, but never before has the combination of mobile devices, task management applications, Google Sheets and the like been available. These are powerful tools when used the right way.
    Last edited by repo_man; 10-13-2017 at 05:42 AM.

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