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Thread: AI: Superintelligence - paths, dangers and strategies

  1. #71
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
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    Flying machines with flapping wings are called "ornithopters", not planes.

    Funny thing: everyone who made a video of their human powered ornithopter or anything they thought close enough to call one seems to think they're the first.
    You winsome, you loathsome.
    --Meditations on Uncertainty Vol ξ(x)

  2. #72
    know nothing pensive_pilgrim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starjots View Post
    Reminds me of The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins. Clearly, as you state, this sort of thinking has had a lot of impact.



    Since evolution is really just an algorithm with a few ingredients like overproduction, mutation, selection and so forth, certainly seems to me artificial evolution is possible.
    Of course it's possible, but if humans are just input/output survival and reproduction machines, it should be the only thing possible. That was my point.

    In consumer products the environment that does the selecting is the consumers, the replicators are the manufacturers/makers, the resource that enables reproduction is money and the mutation is the various 'new and improved' variations of products etc.

    The products are created by our conscious minds but don't behave like products of natural evolution. The 9 multigrain bread which has supplanted white bread is not an animal. The latest iPhone or Samsung smartphone is not a living thing either. I think the reason is the environment is humans, not the natural environment. Then again, domestic animals have been artificially evolved but they start from living creatures.

    So I'd say in a way our products do behave in a sense - they have populations, thrive, go extinct and so forth from an extrinsic perspective but have no or limited behavior intrinsically. Then again, technology has begun to make smarter products which might have behaviors but these in are supposed to be in our service.

    So..... could it be our collective human desire to select for more 'behavioring' and 'human like' qualities in products is enough to drive their coming into existence? I'd say maybe yes!
    I think the mechanism by which consumer products succeed or fail could be largely evolutionary. What really changes the formula is that new products aren't just variations of old ones, instead we can be inspired to create in entirely new ways. I suspect that this kind of creativity was also the spark of abiogenesis, and the reason why anything at all exists.

  3. #73
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
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    Product success or failure is more influenced by marketing than evolution is. Marketing plays a nontrivial role in species that depend on either other species or other members of their species for sexual reproduction, but every species I can think of has a means to reproduce and potentially evolve without being successful marketing for sexual reproduction.

    Not so with tools.
    You winsome, you loathsome.
    --Meditations on Uncertainty Vol ξ(x)

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