Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Homeschooling

  1. #1
    TJ TeresaJ's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    mosquito-infested hell
    Posts
    2,748

    Homeschooling

    Let's talk about homeschooling. @Robcore says the homeschooled kids he knew were well adjusted and polite, and transferring to a regular school was a shock.

    Personally I went to a magnet public school, which was awful in a lot of ways but also... shall we say... "character-building."

    In college I knew this girl who had been homeschooled up to that point, and she was an SJW snowflake in the derogatory sense, before that was a thing. She got offended in every class, including an economics seminar of fifteen students. Of the fifteen students, three including myself were female. Me, one other girl, and about five of the guys made up a clique that got along really well with the professor. The homeschooled girl was not in the clique, did not get along with the professor, and said it was because he was obviously sexist. Me and the other girl were like, "I don't think that means what you think it means."

    Reasons to homeschool:
    Popular culture these days is legitimately worrisome
    Locally available academic standards may not be up to par
    Kid does better alone
    Kid is *not* put into the artificial factory/cage environment of school together with 30 other juveniles

    Reasons not to homeschool (as a parent):
    It requires more organization and effort than I'm prepared to give
    The kiddo and I are already probably overly symbiotic
    This is something that could better be outsourced

    I think I would be very in favor of homeschooling if I a) had a ton of kids and they would all learn together and teach each other, and/or b) I lived on a commune with other like-minded families.

    Having said all that, hybrid homeschools do appeal to me: They provide the outline of the curriculum and there are structured classes two-three days/week. It's something I would at least consider.
    Too bad, Lady Une. You were far too lenient.
    As a soldier, yes. But as a civilian I lived an austere life.

  2. #2
    Member
    Type
    INFJ
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    656
    Quote Originally Posted by TeresaJ View Post
    Reasons to homeschool:
    avoiding vaccinations that contain known neurotoxins like aluminium

  3. #3
    Global Moderator Polemarch's Avatar
    Type
    ENTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    1,625
    Quote Originally Posted by mara View Post
    avoiding vaccinations that contain known neurotoxins like aluminium
    do you post about anything else
    We didn't land on Plymouth Rock. Plymouth Rock landed on us.

  4. #4
    Member Mxx's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    3,322
    If homeschooled, how would you ensure that your son (as an only child) acquires the necessary socialization skills (like sharing, realizing he's not the center of the universe, conflict resolution with peers, discovery of personality and self through the interaction with peers)?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Mxx View Post
    If homeschooled, how would you ensure that your son (as an only child) acquires the necessary socialization skills (like sharing, realizing he's not the center of the universe, conflict resolution with peers, discovery of personality and self through the interaction with peers)?
    My brother and I were homeschooled for most of my elementary and middle school education, while living in New England and the Southeast. Our towns all had homeschool groups, so we met kids our own age to do everything from farm field trips to state capitol visits to science fair projects to swim parties. We also spent a lot of time with neighborhood kids, and with friends from church.

    That said, I did turn out INTJ, so you could argue that the socialization wasn't effective. Or maybe it's because I was vaccinated.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Starjots's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,055
    I've had a lot of experience on the parent side of things, 3 out of 4 kids had significant homeschooling. After 15 years ago I'd have rather gone the public route since the education system where I live is relatively good. The fact I got divorced is probably 37% attributable - maybe more - to home schooling. So maybe its a good thing.

    Pros
    Flexible - as in what the kids might learn
    Flexible - as in your schedule, you can take vacations when it makes sense (don't underestimate this one)
    Quality - you have more control

    Cons
    Breadth - you have to make sure what's important is covered
    Time - Teaching is an enormous time sink, quite inefficient 1 to 1 or 1 to 2. There is a strong tendency to workbook the kid and not actually teach them anything. It's no different than playing with your kids. Fun right? Fun all the time? What!
    Time - Making a curriculum is a big time sink as well.
    Quality of Materials - ranges from ok/good to crap. The homeschool market when I was more active was mostly faith types of people, and unless that's your bag you can throw most of it out. The good books they want your kids to read in some circles are a mixed bag as well. Example, Edgar Rice Burroughs was oft on the good books lists. The gender stereotypes are mind numbing even if the stories are entertaining. Which means more time sunk into curriculum.

    As the kids get older I think it makes less and less sense because teaching biology with a real lab is impossible unless that's what you already do - or calculus if your math is rusty, etc.

    IF you have a stay at home parent I think this is feasible if you want this to be that parent's number one hobby in life. Then of course, good deal.

    So here's the sort of 'homeschooling' various kids have had at various times.
    Pure homeschooling on curriculum we did
    Small private school with homeschool subjects added in
    Online stuff with very credentialed teachers and interface from 1620
    Mixes of community college, local high school, online stuff

    The sky is the limit in how complicated you can make your life and your kid's life.

    The most effective uber parents I've seen make sure they live in a good school district and add as much salt (their own teaching) to the mix as they want.

    Possible Problems:
    Social - well it can cut both ways, but on the whole I wish 2 out of 3 kids had more of this. But all three are better spoken than your average kid and all three have no trouble dealing with adults. They did have a ton of activities.
    Kids tuning out - if your teaching goals and their minds don't meet they can tune out just as easily as they might in school. Not engaging (like playing with them on the floor sort of engaging) increases chance of tune out. They tune back in too easy enough once you 'get back on the floor' with them.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Starjots View Post
    I've had a lot of experience on the parent side of things, 3 out of 4 kids had significant homeschooling. After 15 years ago I'd have rather gone the public route since the education system where I live is relatively good. The fact I got divorced is probably 37% attributable - maybe more - to home schooling. So maybe its a good thing.

    Pros
    Flexible - as in what the kids might learn
    Flexible - as in your schedule, you can take vacations when it makes sense (don't underestimate this one)
    Quality - you have more control

    Cons
    Breadth - you have to make sure what's important is covered
    Time - Teaching is an enormous time sink, quite inefficient 1 to 1 or 1 to 2. There is a strong tendency to workbook the kid and not actually teach them anything. It's no different than playing with your kids. Fun right? Fun all the time? What!
    Time - Making a curriculum is a big time sink as well.
    Quality of Materials - ranges from ok/good to crap. The homeschool market when I was more active was mostly faith types of people, and unless that's your bag you can throw most of it out. The good books they want your kids to read in some circles are a mixed bag as well. Example, Edgar Rice Burroughs was oft on the good books lists. The gender stereotypes are mind numbing even if the stories are entertaining. Which means more time sunk into curriculum.

    As the kids get older I think it makes less and less sense because teaching biology with a real lab is impossible unless that's what you already do - or calculus if your math is rusty, etc.

    IF you have a stay at home parent I think this is feasible if you want this to be that parent's number one hobby in life. Then of course, good deal.

    So here's the sort of 'homeschooling' various kids have had at various times.
    Pure homeschooling on curriculum we did
    Small private school with homeschool subjects added in
    Online stuff with very credentialed teachers and interface from 1620
    Mixes of community college, local high school, online stuff

    The sky is the limit in how complicated you can make your life and your kid's life.

    The most effective uber parents I've seen make sure they live in a good school district and add as much salt (their own teaching) to the mix as they want.

    Possible Problems:
    Social - well it can cut both ways, but on the whole I wish 2 out of 3 kids had more of this. But all three are better spoken than your average kid and all three have no trouble dealing with adults. They did have a ton of activities.
    Kids tuning out - if your teaching goals and their minds don't meet they can tune out just as easily as they might in school. Not engaging (like playing with them on the floor sort of engaging) increases chance of tune out. They tune back in too easy enough once you 'get back on the floor' with them.
    I agree with most of this (from the kid end).

    Pros: Overall, most relate to flexibility, self-directed learning, and making learning a joy and a process of exploration.
    -If we were diligent, we could finish our work by noon most days, and finish math and spelling by March. I don't know what we did for the rest of the time--lots of blanket forts, cooking, bad music-making, skiing on the lake, and rollerskating tricks, I think?
    -We could travel when my dad had work meetings, so we would try to time certain things with trips--like driving to Boston with him and walking the Freedom Trail as our history lesson with my mom. I think this sort of blended our work/pleasure ideas.
    -We were encouraged to influence our curriculum within reason--science projects, reading assignments, research paper topics, the focus in history, etc. I remember raising chicks, hatching butterflies, doing science projects involving explosions and rockets, making fabric dyes with local plants, and so on. I honestly don't remember if some things were our own projects or school.
    -Some states require documenting hours of each subject but can be flexible--we hung out and bothered older adults at the local nursing home for part of our social studies hours, for example.
    -I remember reading well over 100 books a year given the extra time we had. Most of this was self-directed.

    Cons:
    -Well, I definitely remember my first screaming fights with my mom being over how to do math problems ("I know that's not how the book says to do it, but my way works and is faster!!!!"). So I imagine that was fun for her.
    -The transition to group education:
    I was used to moving at my own pace, and I was mostly used to being treated as an adult (or even more than an adult--if I got my work done, it didn't matter if I did so on the floor, in whatever order I felt, with the dog helping). I remember getting in trouble for never sitting properly at my desk ("Why can't my leg be beside my ear?! I'm getting my work done!") and for reading ahead of the other kids. Gym class was lame because I didn't know the rules of crab soccer or whatever other nonsense group sports were happening. I also hadn't learned not to be a know-it-all, so I was very blunt when other kids were wrong and spent most of 8th grade raising my hand to correct how my teacher diagrammed sentences. Somehow I still made friends.

    I know my mom spent a lot of time on curriculum planning, and that texts she saw in homeschool circles were often subpar by her standards (she was a teacher before staying home with us, so we had an additional advantage). There was a lot of idea exchange amongst the homeschool parents to supplement textbooks, as I recall. She did generally find texts that were thorough, and we taught ourselves through a fair portion as we got a little older (I think kids don't get enough credit for being able to read, understand, and apply concepts in math and science, particularly).

    We went to public school when we got older for the math and science. For high school, I know other homeschoolers did part-time public school, online courses, or community college at 16.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,288
    I probably would have committed suicide before graduation if my parents had tried to homeschool me.

  9. #9
    non-canonical Light Leak's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Lost-Hope
    Posts
    2,140
    The only taste of homeschooling I got was my mom ordered these workbooks for us to do over the summer. She made us do a certain portion of them every day. That was torture enough - partially because it was summer and I didn't want to be doing schoolwork in the first place, but also because I was afraid of the scolding and lectures my mom would give if I got an answer wrong. I'm sure some parents are good teachers. My mom is not. I'm glad I went to public school.

  10. #10
    know nothing pensive_pilgrim's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,055
    Before I started school my stepmom would do after-dinner lessons with flashcards and stuff. I remember adding and subtracting buckeyes. It made a huge difference in my life. I started kindergarten able to read and do arithmetic. However, since everybody else in kindergarten was learning that stuff they didn't really have anything for me to do, and it set me apart a bit socially from an early age. I was a fucked up little kid though so YMMV

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •