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Thread: Homeschooling

  1. #11
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    I almost forget that I homeschooled for half a year or something because at that stage I was skipping school for weeks/months at a time, so we all thought "why not give this a shot?" I had a different kind where I received a phone call during the day for a group chat with the teacher and the other kids. That didn't work well with my underlying social anxiety so I slept through most of that.

    I think homeschooling could be whatever. It depends how you do it.

    I also think that, maybe, a super efficient primary/secondary level education isn't that important. Maybe more important is arming that kid to be able to do things later on. (some way to get to university if he wants, social skills, not turning into a pretentious twat, etc) And that might not necessarily mean having great teachers, but maybe instead, having really bad teachers, but the right guidance from you/others to learn from those things well.

    I almost started going to a kind of montessori (I think) school when I was 15 or so. It was in a nice mansion in an affluent area, and the kids were allowed to follow their own aspirations. I think I might have enjoyed that (there was no bus connection).

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polemarch View Post
    do you post about anything else
    yes but vaccinations ARE a factor for why some people homeschool

    so in australia they are coercing parents to vaccinate their children because they are withholding welfare if they don't

    In california i think they have passed laws to do with vaccinating all kids at public schools...or they're trying to...something like that

    that then leaves parents with two choices: move to another state or homeschool

  3. #13
    Dr.Awkward Robcore's Avatar
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    Meant to respond to this thread days ago, but here I am, better late than never...

    Anyhow, since we decided to home school our kids, the main thing that people seem concerned with is socialization. I don't really get it. Bullying and depression and insecurity and shame and a host of other socially influenced dysfunctions are par for the course in most schools that I'm familiar with. Even in the private Catholic elementary school that I went to, it was still 50/50 good socialization vs. bad. I skipped from grade 1 to grade 2 at the Christmas break, and was basically bullied for the next 5 years...and I didn't learn coping skills from school, I learned them at home by brainstorming with my parents.

    Kids that don't learn conflict resolution and sharing at home don't exactly learn those things better in school...they end up in trouble a lot. The kids who are great at it, obviously have a home life where there's lots of discussion and interaction and problem solving and inclusion. When I worked in a daycare, I saw a lot of kids from good homes learning bad habits from kids who were not so fortunate, too...so avoiding that early peer influence, and helping to foster independent thinking is extra valuable to me.

    Pro-social skills are best learned from people who actually have those skills, not from other kids.

    Also, I'm not sure how often in life we need the social skills that are suited to being in a classroom of 30 kids. I mean, if you can sit quietly through a movie at the theater, and if you can raise a question in front of a group of people, and if you can play a team sport, then you've pretty much aced it. All of those things are pretty easy to practice as a home schooler.

    The kids I knew who transferred to high school from home school did have difficulties...but they had difficulties because they were well adjusted. lol. I mean, there's almost no part of high school socializing that accurately reflects the socializing that one ought to try to emulate post-graduation.


    So far, we're just doing Kindergarten...and we can literally be done a full day's work in 15-20 minutes (often broken up into 2 10 minute sessions in the day).
    In those 15-20 minutes, the 3 year old and 1 year old are also learning. The 3 year old knows the days of the week and their sequence, for example, because she sings along during calendar time. The two littlest ones also do art at the same time as their big bro, and are getting better quickly.
    We've got a pen pal that we've Skyped with, and a teacher who is awesome at giving us resources and recommendations...and the school we signed up with issued us a free ipad with some great educational apps (I was skeptical at first, but these apps work really well for our guy...he's learning letter sounds and other reading skills faster with the ipad than he does when we do paper exercises with him...plus, he finds K level paper books SUPER boring, and refuses to try to read them...but he'll read a bunch of them on the ipad, so yay for tech). We also get a budget of $600 to spend on educational resources of our choosing (subject to teacher approval).

    It also helps that my wife has a bachelor of Education in addition to her bachelor of arts...so she knows a lot of good curriculum resources already, and has a network of teacher friends whose brains she can pick.

    Actually, we got the report card back for first semester last week, and apparently our boy has already passed Kindergarten...with the exception of demonstrating proficiency in telling a story (eg. via a puppet show); he's meeting or exceeding expectations on every other curriculum requirement. The teacher recommended that we keep working on a few reading skills, and otherwise just continuing to learn throughout the rest of the year via play and crafts and other child-directed things. I think we'll keep progressing ahead in math, as long as he keeps interested...and of course science and art are pretty much daily endeavors in our house whether we're doing school or not.

    It's nice for my wife not having to pack him a lunch, not having to wake up early, having a budget to spend on educational stuff of her choosing, and getting free swim times and skate times that the home schoolers in town get(which the girls can attend, too, even though they aren't school age yet)...plus field trips and access to a library of science gear and other stuff that the home schoolers have organized in town.
    Last year the wife did butterflies and hatched chicks with the kids, too...and brought them to all kinds of farms as well(she runs an organic food box business, so the kids have got to experience a lot of cool stuff through that, meeting with our farmers and whatnot).

    The flexibility, and the connection that we get with our kids via home schooling is just awesome.
    ...and he's actually good at making friends...we take him to parks and other kid places, and he never ceases to make friends and interact.
    His current best friend is probably 3 years older than my boy is...funny enough he doesn't get along with the 8 year old's brother who is the same age as Ollie...mostly because the other 5 year old isn't as socially adept.
    ...the origin of emotional sickness lay in people’s belief that they were their personalities...
    "The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong." ~Carl Jung

  4. #14
    TJ TeresaJ's Avatar
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    ^That actually reminds me of this childcare fantasy I used to have. I would find a like-minded hippie/intellectual mom who lives near me and is already homeschooling her kids, and I would pay her to take on mine as well.

    A small group of kids of mixed ages sounds ideal to me.

    I don't think you can take on an outside child if you're homeschooling; can you?

  5. #15
    Dr.Awkward Robcore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TeresaJ View Post
    ^That actually reminds me of this childcare fantasy I used to have. I would find a like-minded hippie/intellectual mom who lives near me and is already homeschooling her kids, and I would pay her to take on mine as well.

    A small group of kids of mixed ages sounds ideal to me.

    I don't think you can take on an outside child if you're homeschooling; can you?
    I don't see why you couldn't do that...our only requirement is to send samples/examples of our child's work...doesn't matter who taught it to them. My sisters have taught things; I teach things; my wife teaches things, and they do group things led by other home school parents, too.
    ...the origin of emotional sickness lay in people’s belief that they were their personalities...
    "The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong." ~Carl Jung

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