View Poll Results: So?

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  • Leave Fatass behind. Your cat will get over it.

    1 5.56%
  • Next time you see your bf, ask him how he honestly feels about the idea of 2 cats

    6 33.33%
  • Don't tell your bf anything, just show up with Fatass and your cat

    7 38.89%
  • Make a thread about this on the internet so he will read it - that's communication!

    4 22.22%
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Thread: My cat's fatass girlfriend

  1. #41
    Homo siderius Sistamatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jigglypuff View Post
    is it me or do cat health issues just seem really common?

    we took our cat to the vet recently (probably the first time she’s ever gone) and they say she has early onset kidney disease. she’s around 9 - 10 years old and we just got her. i was researching this and apparently kidney disease is really common cuz cats tend to not drink enough water, plus their people aren’t aware they’re sorta picky about water. for example they don’t like drinking and eating in the same spot.

    the costs are gonna come later and that sucks but i feel like this is the hidden cost of having a cat. (edit: oh and we’re making sure she always eats wet food, we add some water to her food plus we have a water fountain turned on most the day just for her)

    i’m sure there are some cats that are pampered their entire lives and don’t have problems but is that rare? just due to the nature of cats?

    idk. i mean all animals have problems but almost everyone i’ve talked to with cats mentions some weird health problem or injury their cat had/has.
    A life cycle from birth to death usually involves health problems. It's not a cat thing, it's a being alive thing. My last cat (inky) was healthy til he got sick and died...he was at least 12, but probably closer to 15. My dog was healthy until he got sick and died, minus all the stitches and that one surgery from when he ate something that tore his intestine. Almost every cat I've ever had was healthy until they got sick and died, but my dogs were typically pretty accident prone. My calico was an adult when I got her when I was 5 and lived til I was 19. She lived in four states and outlasted I think it was five family dogs. Cats live on average to about 14. Inky and the Calico were both indoor outdoor cats so they did great considering I couldn't control their access to danger half the time.

    In humans, assuming we don't fall off a cliff or get one of the really bad communicable diseases or genetic disorder in childhood....

    we tend to start having health issues at around 50% of our life span (age 40). That's when we start needing preventatives, start having health problems as a result of everything we put our bodies through, start taking supplements, and start realizing that our peaks are behind us, physically. We've likely had stitches at least once, and have lost track of the number of communicable diseases we've lived through.

    At about 65% of our lifespans (age 50), people stop saying, "Gosh they were so young" if we die. We need annual colonoscopies just in case.

    At about 75% of our lifespan (age 60), almost all of us have expensive health care moments in our near future.

    at about 90% (almost 70) it isn't even all that surprising if we die. It will be a miracle if being alive hasn't resulted from expensive medical interventions.

    at about 100% (age 80) people start treating the fact that you are even alive as some sort of accomplishment.

    So expect, if we extrapolate directly for cats,

    age 7 -- sort of surprising if your cat hasn't been to the vet yet given that they are alive in a world full of microbes, giant feet, and weird shit like antifreeze, string, rat poison and lilies. (yes, lilies can cause kidney failure in cats...even just the pollen or the water from the vase). By now, both cat and human have hopefully learned what things in the house will cause health issues. If they make it this far without getting into something poisonous, they are probably going to live out the life span. I suspect owners who are very proactive have spent less money on emergency visits at this point.

    age 9 -- probably going to need to start doing preventative stuff...maybe joint supplements, bloodwork to head stuff off at the pass, etc.

    age 11 -- expect health issues to crop up.

    age 13 -- if your cat dies of natural causes at this age, no one will be shocked at how young they were. You'll likely have spent some money on something health related by now, especially if their teeth are bad.

    age 15 -- it will be an accomplishment if your cat is alive. You can now start bragging about how old it is.


    It's just that in cats and dogs, this cycle is compressed so it seems like a lot. If you get a pet and keep it for it's life and manage to prevent it from having some sort of fatal accident like getting hit by a car, barring your own premature death, you can 100 percent expect it to grow old and as a result, eventually get sick and die, typically about 15 years from the time it was born. It's not a matter of whether this will happen. It will happen. You just won't know the details until the end.

    If someone is not willing to do deal with cradle to grave care and all the requisite emotional and monetary expenses, they should not get a pet.

    I can, if my cats live average lifespans, expect for all three of them to sicken and die between 2030 and 2035. I'll have spent less money on Spock than the other two most likely because he doesn't have teeth to maintain. (That surgery I had to pay for will pay for itself.)

    I'll be at my own average lifespan in 2050. Depending on how I'm doing I may have time for one more round of cats.
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  2. #42
    Hasta Siempre Madrigal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jigglypuff View Post
    is it me or do cat health issues just seem really common?

    we took our cat to the vet recently (probably the first time she’s ever gone) and they say she has early onset kidney disease. she’s around 9 - 10 years old and we just got her. i was researching this and apparently kidney disease is really common cuz cats tend to not drink enough water, plus their people aren’t aware they’re sorta picky about water. for example they don’t like drinking and eating in the same spot.

    the costs are gonna come later and that sucks but i feel like this is the hidden cost of having a cat. (edit: oh and we’re making sure she always eats wet food, we add some water to her food plus we have a water fountain turned on most the day just for her)

    i’m sure there are some cats that are pampered their entire lives and don’t have problems but is that rare? just due to the nature of cats?

    idk. i mean all animals have problems but almost everyone i’ve talked to with cats mentions some weird health problem or injury their cat had/has.
    It's been my experince that cats get all kinds of diseases all the time, but whenever I tell someone that, they find it odd and have a story about a cat they had which lived 20 years and died of old age.

    How's your cat's uremia and creatinine levels? This has been an odyssey, with the cat taking subcuteanous saline twice a day, vitamin and iron supplements in the saline, 2 daily medications for stomach acid - one subcutaneous one and another that's oral (if the uremia goes up too high they can get ulcers), a daily antiemetic, erythropoietin shots, and then three homeopathic remedies (one of them for the cancer, which supposedly went away). The homeopathic lady also does reiki and magnet therapy on him. Now he also has to take blood pressure medication because their kidneys regulate blood pressure, and if it's not regulated it can also affect the heart.

    He sees the best cat nephrologist in Argentina and he's gonna hook me up with the best in Chile (dunno how affordable she will be, so I'll see). Anyway, it's an expensive disease to have. Whenever I leave the country I have to get a live-in nurse for 24-hour care (my sister in this case).

    Quote Originally Posted by TeresaJ View Post
    Ok I'm gonna say it:

    Expensive health treatments for pets are an unnecessary luxury.

    Fatass is an accessory to draining-all-your-resources cat. Once draining-all-your-resources cat is out of the picture, I think you should have a euthanization policy for all secondary pets.
    If health is an unnecessary luxury, what's a necessary luxury? I can't save money since this started but as long as I can pay for it I don't care.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    Heh. We've been here years now.

  3. #43
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    ^ @Sistamatic
    yeahhh true!

    i guess it's a matter of our time perspective. like i'm not surprised she has health problems but before reading about cat kidney disease, i just had no idea it was something i had to watch out for, cuz it's so common for cats and it also seems easily prevented if they're primarily indoor and you're managing their water sources.

    my cat was a stray then indoor-outdoor so she's been exposed to all sorts of shit i don't even know about and can't imagine.

    she also has some issue about her teeth and we got her these dental treat thingies. ???

    i've never had a cat so i'm learning as i go


    @Madrigal
    ok, i don't even know what most of that means. i wasn't there for that conversation with the vet (i was busy that day and my SO took her) and i don't have the paper with me right now.

    we weren't prepared for the costs of taking extra tests for that visit but the next time we'll have to prepare for that.

    i'm not sure how evident the disease is supposed to be from the outside. her behavior is totally healthy, but she's never had fancy stuff like a water fountain before and her prior caretaker (my SO's grandma) wasn't fussy at all about her. she's getting way more attention now.
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  4. #44
    Hasta Siempre Madrigal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jigglypuff View Post
    she also has some issue about her teeth and we got her these dental treat thingies. ???

    i've never had a cat so i'm learning as i go
    Cats with kidney disease often get gingivitis (which my cat has). It's treated with corticoids, but that harms their kidney function even more.

    I give him Hill's Kidney Care prescription diet and it's small so he doesn't chew it that much, just swallows most of it.

    If there's anything I learned from this, it's to not do everything the vets recommend. Like corticoids. Or an IV when you can just give them subcutaneous saline, I always ask about the least invasive treatment and I don't let them give him shots if I can put it in his saline.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    Heh. We've been here years now.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madrigal View Post
    Cats with kidney disease often get gingivitis (which my cat has). It's treated with corticoids, but that harms their kidney function even more.

    I give him Hill's Kidney Care prescription diet and it's small so he doesn't chew it that much, just swallows most of it.

    If there's anything I learned from this, it's to not do everything the vets recommend. Like corticoids. Or an IV when you can just give them subcutaneous saline, I always ask about the least invasive treatment and I don't let them give him shots if I can put it in his saline.
    thanks, i'm gonna look up that kidney care diet.

    i also don't do everything that vets recommend, cuz... well, i have chickens and the minute anything goes wrong there's always some vet that recommends euthanasia as a kneejerk response. i had my oldest one, prudence, bounce back after treatment better than ever (i'm still not sure what her sickness actually was), but she doesn't lay eggs anymore.

    i have lots to learn but it seems easier to get information and quality care for cats at least then it is for chickens (understandably).

    edit: i don't meant to derail or take over your thread with this, haha.
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  6. #46
    Hasta Siempre Madrigal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jigglypuff View Post
    thanks, i'm gonna look up that kidney care diet.

    i also don't do everything that vets recommend, cuz... well, i have chickens and the minute anything goes wrong there's always some vet that recommends euthanasia as a kneejerk response. i had my oldest one, prudence, bounce back after treatment better than ever (i'm still not sure what her sickness actually was), but she doesn't lay eggs anymore.

    i have lots to learn but it seems easier to get information and quality care for cats at least then it is for chickens (understandably).

    edit: i don't meant to derail or take over your thread with this, haha.
    We can talk about it here or in my blog, still interested in the uremia and creatinine.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    Heh. We've been here years now.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madrigal View Post
    We can talk about it here or in my blog, still interested in the uremia and creatinine.
    sure!

    (i went immediately to google those terms cuz research is my hobby /intp)
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  8. #48
    Homo siderius Sistamatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madrigal View Post
    Cats with kidney disease often get gingivitis (which my cat has). It's treated with corticoids, but that harms their kidney function even more.

    I give him Hill's Kidney Care prescription diet and it's small so he doesn't chew it that much, just swallows most of it.

    If there's anything I learned from this, it's to not do everything the vets recommend. Like corticoids. Or an IV when you can just give them subcutaneous saline, I always ask about the least invasive treatment and I don't let them give him shots if I can put it in his saline.
    When I found out Spock had stomatitis I had the choice between daily corticoids that would eventually lead to kidney disease, or having all his teeth removed. I went with the latter. He is a happy healthy baby now. I was actually pretty uncomfortable with the fact that I had to have him on steroids for one week prior to the surgery to get the inflammation down enough for the operation. I had to take them for poison ivy one time and I felt like every single system in my body was messed up.


    @jigglypuff...since you are a first time kitty owner. Freaking lilies...one of the most common bouquet flowers, are lethal as hell for cats. The leaves, petals, pollen, even the water in the vase. And it leads to kidney failure in very small amounts. (this one gives me nightmares because I had lilies in the house with inky many times and I'm only lucky that he never ingested any) Pesticides, including topical flea treatments used on dogs, pretty much everything people use for treating lice, and a great many of the flea sprays used in homes. Also most of the NSAIDS humans use. Onions and garlic are bad and sometimes people feed their cats meat baby food and have issues because of the onion powder therein. Tuna that is meant for humans causes crystals to form and block their urinary tract and can cause another weird problem that makes their fat cells swell up. Avocados, anything sweetened with something that ends in "itol" (sorbitol, maltitol, xylitol, etc.) anything with caffeine, chocolate, grapes and raisins (even worse for dogs), any dairy product, and alcohol...like just a little alcohol can severely fuck up a cat. Mine are not permitted any food other than cat food, and I research what kinds of chems I use to clean where the cats will come in contact. The fact that they lick their bodies every day and therefore ingest everything they lay on or rub against is something that has to be taken into account.

    I suspect my own exposure to health issues is decreased because of the way I'm careful about cleaning products for their sake.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/life-s...r-2033305.html
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  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sistamatic View Post
    @jigglypuff...since you are a first time kitty owner. Freaking lilies...one of the most common bouquet flowers, are lethal as hell for cats. The leaves, petals, pollen, even the water in the vase. And it leads to kidney failure in very small amounts. (this one gives me nightmares because I had lilies in the house with inky many times and I'm only lucky that he never ingested any) Pesticides, including topical flea treatments used on dogs, pretty much everything people use for treating lice, and a great many of the flea sprays used in homes. Also most of the NSAIDS humans use. Onions and garlic are bad and sometimes people feed their cats meat baby food and have issues because of the onion powder therein. Tuna that is meant for humans causes crystals to form and block their urinary tract and can cause another weird problem that makes their fat cells swell up. Avocados, anything sweetened with something that ends in "itol" (sorbitol, maltitol, xylitol, etc.) anything with caffeine, chocolate, grapes and raisins (even worse for dogs), any dairy product, and alcohol...like just a little alcohol can severely fuck up a cat. Mine are not permitted any food other than cat food, and I research what kinds of chems I use to clean where the cats will come in contact. The fact that they lick their bodies every day and therefore ingest everything they lay on or rub against is something that has to be taken into account.

    I suspect my own exposure to health issues is decreased because of the way I'm careful about cleaning products for their sake.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/life-s...r-2033305.html
    invaluable information, tysm

    she stays at my SO's place and he has been extra vigilant about cleaning since. she used to live in a really dusty, dirty house of an extreme hoarder...

    i'm gonna remember this about the cleaning products. (will do more research about cat-safe products)
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  10. #50
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    @Madrigal
    i have the results from the vet right now

    BUN: 43 mg/dL
    creatinine: 1.2 mg/dL
    BUN / creatinine ratio: 36

    ^ it came color coded like that, and after the red it says "HIGH"

    for reference it says normal adult ratio for BUN is 14-36, creatinine 0.6-2.4, BUN / creatinine ratio 4-33

    oh yeah, the note from the vet says to check back in 3 months to see if the levels are increasing, and they recommended the same kidney care food that you're giving your cat (either that or Royal Canin renal).
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