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Thread: Child safety

  1. #1
    Damned
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    Child safety

    Pool ladder design flaw.


  2. #2
    Damned
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    There was a warning a few years ago that baby carriers that hold the baby against your back could overheat the baby. I actually thought of that when I'd see them. Ever get too hot in bed? Or anywhere? I'd be thinking about that if I carried a baby like that. The adult is walking and producing body heat and the resting baby's front side is squished against the adult. That can't be good.

  3. #3
    Dr.Awkward Robcore's Avatar
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    There's no such thing as child-proof.

    When I worked at a daycare as a support for kids with behaviour issues there was such an emphasis on safety that it was actually negative for the kids, imo. The policy for the kids on the playground was "Up the stairs, down the slide"...but the boy I was supporting wanted to go up the slide, and jump over the stairs. I did that all the time as a kid...ended up strong, agile, and with good spatial awareness. Risk is important for development. The key is to mitigate the harms associated with failure. Pea gravel is sufficient on the playground.
    ...the origin of emotional sickness lay in people’s belief that they were their personalities...
    "The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong." ~Carl Jung

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    Faster. Than. Ever. Sloth's Avatar
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    I considered making a thread similar to this a couple months ago when I came across this article:

    Woman speaks out after her toddler was injured on a trampoline

    It's terrible what happened to that kid, but I was amazed that it happened. We've known for DECADES that trampolines are extremely dangerous for kids under the age of 6 or so (and isn't a good idea in general until your late teens because you're still growing). When I was a little kid my neighbors had a trampoline, and a lot of the neighbor kids would jump on it but my mom would never let me. She said "they're too dangerous, if you want to jump on them when you're an adult that'll be your decision" I still haven't ever jumped on one (I dislocated my right knee at 22 so that has dashed all desires to get on a trampoline). I was allowed to go into bounce houses though.

    Also those neighbors got rid of the trampoline after a few years because a kid fell off it and they were worried about other kids hurting themselves. I digress.

    Around age 12 when the internet was starting to get its sea legs, I looked up some information about trampolines and there are a lot of physics involved that if you ignore you're in for a quick and harsh injury.

    In regard to the article I linked I was extra surprised that there was a trampoline park that allowed kids that small on to a trampoline in the first place. I have some sympathy for the mom because she probably thought she was doing the right thing by having it supervised by a "professional", but at the same time this happened last year and some internet research would have prevented this.

  5. #5
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    Yeah. In high school we had a trampoline. The kids waiting their turn would have to surround it to spot the jumper. One jumper started getting too close to the edge and all the spotters in that section started running away.

  6. #6
    malarkey oxyjen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robcore View Post
    There's no such thing as child-proof.

    When I worked at a daycare as a support for kids with behaviour issues there was such an emphasis on safety that it was actually negative for the kids, imo. The policy for the kids on the playground was "Up the stairs, down the slide"...but the boy I was supporting wanted to go up the slide, and jump over the stairs. I did that all the time as a kid...ended up strong, agile, and with good spatial awareness. Risk is important for development. The key is to mitigate the harms associated with failure. Pea gravel is sufficient on the playground.
    The thing is that kids display different levels of readiness, even at the same age, to take on certain levels of risk. In a group environment, especially in terms of liability and perceived fairness, you have to set the rules to the least amount of risk. Like maybe you wouldn't have walked up the slide and barreled over a kid who was waiting to come down, but someone else might. Granted, with close enough supervision some of this may be mitigated but with kids it only takes a second (and if a parent of a hurt child was told there are no 'rules' about how to 'properly' use the slide, they perceive it as negligence or poor caretaking).

  7. #7
    Dr.Awkward Robcore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sloth View Post
    I considered making a thread similar to this a couple months ago when I came across this article:

    Woman speaks out after her toddler was injured on a trampoline

    It's terrible what happened to that kid, but I was amazed that it happened. We've known for DECADES that trampolines are extremely dangerous for kids under the age of 6 or so (and isn't a good idea in general until your late teens because you're still growing). When I was a little kid my neighbors had a trampoline, and a lot of the neighbor kids would jump on it but my mom would never let me. She said "they're too dangerous, if you want to jump on them when you're an adult that'll be your decision" I still haven't ever jumped on one (I dislocated my right knee at 22 so that has dashed all desires to get on a trampoline). I was allowed to go into bounce houses though.

    Also those neighbors got rid of the trampoline after a few years because a kid fell off it and they were worried about other kids hurting themselves. I digress.

    Around age 12 when the internet was starting to get its sea legs, I looked up some information about trampolines and there are a lot of physics involved that if you ignore you're in for a quick and harsh injury.

    In regard to the article I linked I was extra surprised that there was a trampoline park that allowed kids that small on to a trampoline in the first place. I have some sympathy for the mom because she probably thought she was doing the right thing by having it supervised by a "professional", but at the same time this happened last year and some internet research would have prevented this.
    My boy started trampolining at age 2, and my daughters each started at 8-9 months, shortly after they started walking.
    The doctor told us that they shouldn't start using the Jolly Jumper until about 7 months...but they were all bored with it by then(they all went in it as soon as they had the strength to keep their heads relatively steady).
    We have a net around our trampoline, though. They were way more dangerous before they started selling them with the netting.
    ...the origin of emotional sickness lay in people’s belief that they were their personalities...
    "The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong." ~Carl Jung

  8. #8
    Dr.Awkward Robcore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oxyjen View Post
    The thing is that kids display different levels of readiness, even at the same age, to take on certain levels of risk. In a group environment, especially in terms of liability and perceived fairness, you have to set the rules to the least amount of risk. Like maybe you wouldn't have walked up the slide and barreled over a kid who was waiting to come down, but someone else might. Granted, with close enough supervision some of this may be mitigated but with kids it only takes a second (and if a parent of a hurt child was told there are no 'rules' about how to 'properly' use the slide, they perceive it as negligence or poor caretaking).
    Liability is an unfortunate excuse to inhibit the speedy development of kids who advance more quickly. It also keeps other kids from seeing advanced behaviour, which helps them learn.
    ...and rules + toddlers is just funny. Might as well make a rule that all kids should obey the rules. It will be adhered to the same as other rules...which is like...50% of the time.
    ...the origin of emotional sickness lay in people’s belief that they were their personalities...
    "The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong." ~Carl Jung

  9. #9
    Faster. Than. Ever. Sloth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robcore View Post
    They were way more dangerous before they started selling them with the netting.
    They're still very dangerous for small children no matter what though. The kid in the article I linked was injured even when being monitored by a trained professional.

  10. #10

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