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Thread: Emotions map

  1. #21
    just dont think about it mhc's Avatar
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    you both look like you click so im bowing out for now. work well
    Just look at the blue sky

  2. #22
    Member repo_man's Avatar
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    Thank you very much for your help.

    I tried to apply the emotions map to Robbins's emotion groups, see below. In my opinion, the two approaches produce similar results [EDIT: as in, similar groupings]. This was a useful exercise and increased my understanding of the emotions.

    Spoiler: My take on Chapter 11 notes


    1. Discomfort, Boredom, impatience, unease, distress, mild embarrassment.
    -all of these seem to be mildly unpleasant, mildly on the side of "energy" (as opposed to sleepiness), have present orientation (impatience has some future orientation) and environment orientation (except embarrassment that has self orientation, and possibly impatience that may have other people orientation); on "dominance" these may mainly be "submissive" except impatience which is "dominant"

    2. Fear, concern, apprehension, worry, anxiety, fright, terror
    -all seem "submissive" and have future orientation, as well as environment or other people orientation; they seem all on the side of "energy" and "unpleasantness" from mild to extreme

    3. Hurt and 6. Disappointment
    -I would look at these two together. Robbins says for hurt that "an expectation that has not been met" and I'd argue that is also what disappointment means; both have past orientation in the sense that the expectation was set in the past; I might say that both are "dominant" emotions; both are probably at least "fairly unpleasant"; whether these are on the side of "energy" or "disappointment" is a bit difficult to say
    -The difference between these two is that hurt has other people orientation and disappointment may have also have environment orientation

    4. Irritated, angry, resentful, furious, enraged
    -dominant, typically other people orientation, "energy" and "unpleasantness" from mild to extreme, probably mainly "present" orientation

    5. Frustration
    -this could fit in the group "1" above but has perhaps higher in intensity
    -probably closest to "impatience", with the difference that in the case of impatience a desired outcome is expected to come too late and in frustration perhaps not at all; one might say impatience has more future orientation

    7. Guilt, regret, remorse
    -self orientation, past orientation (for guilt also present), submissive (or maybe that dimension doesn't really apply for self orientation emotions), perhaps on the side of "sleepiness" rather than "energy", can have varying degrees on unpleasantness depending on intensity
    -Robbins mentions breaking one of your own standards; I think this applies to guilt more than to regret: you may regret not having fertilised your crops because you receive a meager yield, but you will feel guilty only if there is some standard or norm that you violate, for example, if you fail to feed your family when you are expected to do so

    8. Inadequacy:
    -self orientation, submissive, sleepiness rather than energy, perhaps medium unpleasantness, probably past or present orientation

    9. Overload/overwhelm, grief, depression, helplessness
    -high "sleepiness", submissive, can have high unpleasantness, has self and environment orientation, probably present or future orientation

    10. Loneliness
    -sleepiness, submissive, varying degrees of unpleasantness, other people orientation, present orientation



    Also, Robbins's "message" seems to correspond to what you call the "thought".
    Last edited by repo_man; 11-11-2018 at 08:49 AM.

  3. #23
    Member RDF's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by repo_man View Post
    Thank you very much for your help.

    I tried to apply the emotions map to Robbins's emotion groups, see below. In my opinion, the two approaches produce similar results [EDIT: as in, similar groupings]. This was a useful exercise and increased my understanding of the emotions.

    Spoiler: My take on Chapter 11 notes


    1. Discomfort, Boredom, impatience, unease, distress, mild embarrassment.
    -all of these seem to be mildly unpleasant, mildly on the side of "energy" (as opposed to sleepiness), have present orientation (impatience has some future orientation) and environment orientation (except embarrassment that has self orientation, and possibly impatience that may have other people orientation); on "dominance" these may mainly be "submissive" except impatience which is "dominant"

    2. Fear, concern, apprehension, worry, anxiety, fright, terror
    -all seem "submissive" and have future orientation, as well as environment or other people orientation; they seem all on the side of "energy" and "unpleasantness" from mild to extreme

    3. Hurt and 6. Disappointment
    -I would look at these two together. Robbins says for hurt that "an expectation that has not been met" and I'd argue that is also what disappointment means; both have past orientation in the sense that the expectation was set in the past; I might say that both are "dominant" emotions; both are probably at least "fairly unpleasant"; whether these are on the side of "energy" or "disappointment" is a bit difficult to say
    -The difference between these two is that hurt has other people orientation and disappointment may have also have environment orientation

    4. Irritated, angry, resentful, furious, enraged
    -dominant, typically other people orientation, "energy" and "unpleasantness" from mild to extreme, probably mainly "present" orientation

    5. Frustration
    -this could fit in the group "1" above but has perhaps higher in intensity
    -probably closest to "impatience", with the difference that in the case of impatience a desired outcome is expected to come too late and in frustration perhaps not at all; one might say impatience has more future orientation

    7. Guilt, regret, remorse
    -self orientation, past orientation (for guilt also present), submissive (or maybe that dimension doesn't really apply for self orientation emotions), perhaps on the side of "sleepiness" rather than "energy", can have varying degrees on unpleasantness depending on intensity
    -Robbins mentions breaking one of your own standards; I think this applies to guilt more than to regret: you may regret not having fertilised your crops because you receive a meager yield, but you will feel guilty only if there is some standard or norm that you violate, for example, if you fail to feed your family when you are expected to do so

    8. Inadequacy:
    -self orientation, submissive, sleepiness rather than energy, perhaps medium unpleasantness, probably past or present orientation

    9. Overload/overwhelm, grief, depression, helplessness
    -high "sleepiness", submissive, can have high unpleasantness, has self and environment orientation, probably present or future orientation

    10. Loneliness
    -sleepiness, submissive, varying degrees of unpleasantness, other people orientation, present orientation

    Sounds good.

    Quote Originally Posted by repo_man View Post
    Also, Robbins's "message" seems to correspond to what you call the "thought".
    Yes, he's a "life coach," so he mainly sees emotions as a doorway for hacking into the underlying thought processes and making them more productive. Whereas it seems like you're more interested in emotions from a diagnostic angle.

    My own approach to psychology is probably pretty similar to Robbins's. I'm mainly interested in psychology from a self-help or "positive psychology" angle. (I think of MBTI as falling under the heading of "positive psychology.")

  4. #24
    Member Pan_Sonic's Avatar
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    Lol @ NT's trying to define this. The best topography is no substitute for experience.

  5. #25
    Member RDF's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pan_Sonic View Post
    Lol @ NT's trying to define this. The best topography is no substitute for experience.
    Heheh. Thinkers experience emotions. But Thinkers may regard emotions with distrust or may wish to apply logic to them to give them more of a framework and understand them better. IOW, the Thinker views emotions from an "outsider" perspective, so to speak.

    Meanwhile, Feelers like to wallow in emotions.

    So it's a question of who is more likely to provide a good analysis of emotions: The Thinker who experiences emotions but views them from an "outsider" perspective or the Feeler who luxuriates in them like a pig in mud.
    Last edited by RDF; 11-12-2018 at 03:20 AM.

  6. #26
    Member repo_man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pan_Sonic View Post
    The best topography is no substitute for experience.
    Regardless of how little or much experience you have of emotions, it is better to have tools to understand them.

    Is my "topography" understandable to you? Would you place any of the emotions differently on the map?

  7. #27
    Member repo_man's Avatar
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    The argument that "emotions are subjective" has been presented a couple of times. I'd like to say this:

    I agree that I cannot expect to pinpoint emotions by saying that "this emotion has energy score of 72% and unpleasantness score of 40%". Yet, I expect at least to be able to place most emotions in the correct quadrant in the map.

    If the way you experience "playfulness" is closer to the way I experience "fulfilment", then what reason do you have to call the emotion "playfulness" and not "fulfilment"? Inability to find common words for concepts is a breakdown in communication, a breakdown of the contract that is language. It has nothing to do with whether you are a "feeler" or a "thinker".

    If you have some understanding of emotions, there must be some way you can impart it.

    A pre-teen once described "infatuation" as an emotional state where you ride the bicycle five kilometers a day and eat three plates full of meatballs. Can you give a better description for any emotion? Can you be better than the pre-teen?

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