Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Results 61 to 69 of 69

Thread: Unrest in Venezuela

  1. #61
    Member
    Type
    INxP
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    53
    Quote Originally Posted by Sinny View Post
    The rich get richer, the poor get poorer. That's what the figures indicate.
    This is true of every form of government EVER invented or tried by man. TRUE capitalism is about the closest we have ever came to getting it "right". Just to be clear, Im not talking about the perverted form of capitalism we see today. Today government takes an active role in favoring one industry or even business over another with taxation, regulation, "loans", "bailouts", or whatever. If you're "too big to fail" for whatever reason, youre TOO BIG.

  2. #62
    schlemiel Faust's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,806
    Quote Originally Posted by hubieg
    TRUE capitalism is about the closest we have ever came to getting it "right"
    There's no such thing. Just Capitalism, unchecked or otherwise. The irony here is that the reds employ the same no-true-Scotsman line about Communism never having been "true" Communism. Or that the dictators were necessary because Capitalists were hanging around elsewhere in the world. Capitalism is what Capitalism does.

    Some still reserve the hope we can save it from itself through democratic means, e.g. by taxing capital globally. The only reason inequality plummeted in the early 20th century (remember, the playing field at the turn of the century wasn't even by any stretch) is that two world wars destroyed most of the capital in the old world.

    Today government takes an active role in favoring one industry or even business over another with taxation, regulation, "loans", "bailouts", or whatever. If you're "too big to fail" for whatever reason, youre TOO BIG.
    Thank the big ever-consolidating corporates, an everlasting product of Capitalism.
    "All my heroes are dead" - John Zorn

    "It's not selfish if you hate yourself"

  3. #63
    Moderator Thoth's Avatar
    Type
    INFP
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    AHJ 2006
    Posts
    1,015
    Quote Originally Posted by Faust View Post
    There's no such thing. Just Capitalism, unchecked or otherwise. The irony here is that the reds employ the same no-true-Scotsman line about Communism never having been "true" Communism.
    Capitalism: Wealthy corporate elite complaining that their failing economic policy is due to having to prop up the poor.

    Communism: Wealthy political elite complaining their failing economic policy is because someone else is making their people poor.

  4. #64
    I like big buts Sir Caveat's Avatar
    Type
    INTx
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,729
    Quote Originally Posted by Sinny View Post



    Seems like the propaganda of a lefty hack. I just read the Economic Sanctions section of his report.

    Sanctioning financial transactions with 7 henchmen and denying them immigration rights to the US is not very plausible as the mechanism that created severe shortages of food and products in Venezuela.
    1. Antonio Jose ́Benavides Torres [Commander of the Central Integral Strategic Defense Region of the National Armed Forces, former Director of Operations for the National Guard; born June 13, 1961]
    2. Gustavo Enrique Gonza ́lez Lo ́pez [Director General of the National Intel-ligence Service and President of the Strategic Center of Security and Protec-tion of the Homeland; born November 2, 1960]
    3. Justo Jose ́Noguera Pietri [President of the Venezuelan Corporation of Guayana, former General Commander of the National Guard; born March 15, 1961]
    4. Katherine Nayarith Haringhton Padron [National Level Prosecutor of the 20th District Office of the Public Ministry; born December 5, 1971]
    5. Manuel Eduardo Pe ́rez Urdaneta [Director of the National Police; born May 26, 1962]
    6. Manuel Gregorio Bernal Martı ́nez [Chief of the 31st Armored Brigade of Caracas, former Director General of the National Intelligence Service; born July 12, 1965]
    7. Miguel Alcides Vivas Landino [Inspector General of the National Armed Forces, former Commander of the Andes Integral Strategic Defense Region of the National Armed Forces; born July 8, 1961]
    More plausible causes of Venezuela's economic ruin are:
    • government spending in excess of revenue and incurring large debt
    • devaluing the local currency by printing too much, causing hyperinflation
    • price ceilings, which are commonly know to produce shortages;
    • corruption, fueled by such rackets as currency artificial exchange rates available to insiders, such as the convicted Treasurer, and by bribes; and
    • expropriating formerly productive businesses and replacing the expertise of the former workers with people whose primary qualification for the job are being politically connected.
    You hide behind caveats and modifiers. - Lurker

  5. #65
    Senior Member Spartan26's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1,596
    Quote Originally Posted by Madrigal View Post
    Nah, Venezuela's problem is that it's not socialist enough, and half-socialists always commit the sin of political naiveté.
    RDJ begs to differ...



    Quote Originally Posted by Sir Caveat View Post
    You're not ignorant because the information isn't available, you just "haven't been following it closely enough to know for sure."
    To be fair though, there's a ton of information but how do you discern what's a) accurate and b) had the most measurable effect? As an example, I worked at an investment bank in the late 90s into 2000, just into the beginning of the tech bubble bust. I was in a wholly separate dept from technology and venture but some of the things I learned (they learned) was that they, and by extension, the industry, were evaluating companies incorrectly. When they learned how to evaluate such things as sticky users, new unique visitors, bandwidth and online adshare percentage per company, it was inevitable that there'd be a mass correction in valuation. Like, all companies, across the board. Did govt econ decisions cause the bubble to burst, speed the process, lessen or increase the breadth and length of the crash? I'm sure the answer would depend on whom I'm talking to or what lecture class I'm sitting in. But I will say it does seem hard not to point to something you already disagree with and not find it to be a factor.

  6. #66
    I like big buts Sir Caveat's Avatar
    Type
    INTx
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,729
    Quote Originally Posted by Spartan26 View Post
    To be fair though, there's a ton of information but how do you discern what's a) accurate and b) had the most measurable effect? As an example, I worked at an investment bank in the late 90s into 2000, just into the beginning of the tech bubble bust. I was in a wholly separate dept from technology and venture but some of the things I learned (they learned) was that they, and by extension, the industry, were evaluating companies incorrectly. When they learned how to evaluate such things as sticky users, new unique visitors, bandwidth and online adshare percentage per company, it was inevitable that there'd be a mass correction in valuation. Like, all companies, across the board. Did govt econ decisions cause the bubble to burst, speed the process, lessen or increase the breadth and length of the crash? I'm sure the answer would depend on whom I'm talking to or what lecture class I'm sitting in. But I will say it does seem hard not to point to something you already disagree with and not find it to be a factor.
    I appreciate that bias can lead to wrong conclusions, even when intelligent and well informed. And even a well informed person lacking much bias on the matter can get it wrong because of uncertainties about the data, because it's a complex multi-factor matter, and/or because he lacks some insight. Still, it's even more hazardous to make conclusions ignorant of available information.

    Investors could have avoided being burned by the tech bubble by using fundamental analysis with available information about the companies. During the bubble, tech companies had either no earnings or high PE ratios that weren't justified by the company's growth rate. I avoided buying stocks of such companies.
    Last edited by Sir Caveat; 02-14-2019 at 01:01 PM.
    You hide behind caveats and modifiers. - Lurker

  7. #67
    Member
    Type
    INxP
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    53
    Quote Originally Posted by Faust View Post
    There's no such thing. Just Capitalism, unchecked or otherwise. The irony here is that the reds employ the same no-true-Scotsman line about Communism never having been "true" Communism. Or that the dictators were necessary because Capitalists were hanging around elsewhere in the world. Capitalism is what Capitalism does.

    Some still reserve the hope we can save it from itself through democratic means, e.g. by taxing capital globally. The only reason inequality plummeted in the early 20th century (remember, the playing field at the turn of the century wasn't even by any stretch) is that two world wars destroyed most of the capital in the old world.



    Thank the big ever-consolidating corporates, an everlasting product of Capitalism.
    What I am looking at is the theoretical as opposed to practical implementation. True the same could be said about Communism or any other "ism" for that matter. The core issue however is the introduction of the human factor. There is no form of government that is not nor will ever be corrupted by man. It is a fact of human nature that one group will always seek to rule over, or at least have a higher status than another. The inverse is also true, there will ALWAYS be one group that seeks to enrich themselves by taking from another. There will ALWAYS be someone out there to blow your candle out to make theirs seem to burn brighter. Eventually though the pot runs dry for one reason or another and the next group enters to implement their "ism". "Lather, Rinse, Repeat".

  8. #68
    I like big buts Sir Caveat's Avatar
    Type
    INTx
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,729
    Keeping the Chavista dream alive.

    You hide behind caveats and modifiers. - Lurker

  9. #69
    Senior Member Sinny's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Birmingham, UK
    Posts
    4,426
    Air charter firm, client both deny role in alleged shipment of arms to Venezuela

    21 Air says it had no responsibility for the cargo seized in Venezuela, casting blame on a client, which also issued a denial. To complicate matters, one of the firms crossed paths with a company that used to help the CIA.
    By Matias J. Ocner
    An air cargo shipper and its client on Friday both denied knowledge of the small shipment of weapons that Venezuelan authorities said arrived in the city of Valencia earlier this week on a flight from Miami International Airport.

    A Boeing 767 operated by 21 Air, which maintains an operating facility at MIA, delivered cargo earlier this week that included 19 assault rifles, telescopic sights, radio antenna and other materiel to the international airport in Valencia, according to a Bolivarian National Guard general, Endes Palencia.

    The charge drew sharp denials both from the Greensboro, North Carolina-based air cargo company and a second company that arranged the shipment.

    A lawyer for 21 Air, Alberto N. Moris, said Friday that the company was never formally notified by Venezuela of any arms seizure and had no knowledge of the cargo that was aboard its plane since it had been chartered by a second company.

    “All of the cargo on board our aircraft was from the GPS-Air, who chartered the aircraft,” Moris said. The Transportation Security Administration “is going to investigate the party responsible for the cargo,” he added.

    “GPS-Air has been the only company that has chartered it for the last few weeks to Valencia, Venezuela,” Moris added.

    Air charter companies used in global trade routinely insure, fly and maintain aircraft under arrangements known as “wet leasing,” but are not responsible for the goods consigned to them for shipment.

    For its part, a manager at GPS-Air scoffed at the suggestion that assault weapons would be shipped out of Miami’s busy airport.

    “Only a fool would try sending guns out of the airport,” said Cesar Meneses, who identified himself as a manager at the cargo shipper, which has done business with 21 Air and other companies. He said the arms shipment report was a fabrication by Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro to make himself appear as a victim.

    Meneses said any cargo that GPS-Air would have consigned to 21 Air came from third parties.

    “The cargo doesn’t belong to 21 Air and it doesn’t belong to GPS-Air,” Meneses said.

    The denials only added to the mystery of the alleged shipment — a mystery compounded by perhaps coincidental ties between the chairman and a key employee of 21 Air with a company that Amnesty International says once took part in a CIA program to whisk suspected terrorists to “black site” jails around the world, a procedure known as rendition.

    The chairman and majority owner of 21 Air, Adolfo Moreno, has set up or registered at least 14 other companies in Florida over the past two decades. Among the people brought on to 21 Air when it formed in 2014 was Michael Steinke, its director of quality control.

    Both men appear to have either coincidental or direct ties to Gemini Air Cargo, a company that Amnesty International described in a 2006 report as being among more than 30 air charter services believed to have taken part in a CIA program of rendition in which suspected terrorists were abducted abroad and taken to third-country secret “black sites” for interrogation.

    Steinke worked for Gemini Air Cargo from 1996 into 1997, years before the rendition program got off the ground, according to a 2016 Department of Transportation document that gave a summary of 21 Air’s operations as an air cargo carrier.

    For his part, Moreno registered two businesses at an address in northwest Miami that was later used by a subsidiary of Gemini Air Cargo.

    The two businesses were Airline Management Group, incorporated in 1987, and Florida Franchise Development, set up in 2001, both listing their addresses as 1750 NW 66th Ave. in Miami. In 2005, Gemini Cargo Logistics Inc., which Bloomberg lists as a subsidiary of Gemini Air Cargo, registered to that address. The timeline of when the businesses used the address was not clear.

    A visit to the site Friday showed that it is now used by Avianca, the national airline of Colombia.

    The CIA declined to comment for this story.

    Nestor Yglesias, spokesman for Homeland Security Investigations in Miami, declined to comment on whether the agency is investigating the alleged arms shipment to Venezuela.

    21 Air operates out of four mezzanine suites in the west cargo area of Miami International Airport, sharing a nondescript building with companies like Virgin Airlines and Swissport.

    Located directly west of MIA’s airstrips, the building is owned by the airport, and airport spokesman Greg Chin confirmed that 21 Air is a tenant there.

    The suites are separated by function: Operations, Maintenance, Administrative Offices and Shipping/Receiving.

    Inside the Operations suite, where 21 Air President and CEO Michael Mendez reported for work Friday morning, employees were seen monitoring flight path data on computers.

    Building 706, where 21 Air leases space with other companies, measures 181,497 square feet.

    The chairman and chief executive of 21 Air — Moreno and Mendez — are longtime colleagues who have worked together in a series of South Florida aviation and transportation companies ferrying goods to Latin America.

    Moreno is the majority owner of 21 Air and 21 Cargo, the latter of which was established in 1999. The company has also had a web of affiliated companies over the years with names such as JW Aviation, Apple Aviation and Conaire.

    The company 21 Cargo used to be known as Solar Cargo, and was affiliated with a cargo company by the same name that was started in Valencia in February 2001. That business operated in Florida as Solar Cargo C.A., according to court and state records.

    But Moreno was forced to change the name of his company last fall when Solar Cargo C.A. severed its relationship with Moreno.

    “There is no affiliation with 21 Air and Solar,” said Orlando De Frietes Jr., the son of the Solar Cargo owner.

    Mendez has served as the president and CEO of 21 Air since it was created in 2014, according to federal aviation documents, and is an airframe and power-plant mechanic. He has worked in the aviation industry, including specializing in airline certifications, for more than four decades.

    Experts in global arms trafficking said several aspects of the alleged weapons shipment were puzzling, and don’t fit in a pattern that would suggest U.S. government involvement.

    “If the government was doing it, it would make more sense to drop guns that the Venezuelans use. Not only for plausible deniability, but for the ability to use captured ammo,” said Scott Stewart, vice president of tactical analysis at StratFor, an Austin, Texas, geopolitical intelligence firm.

    Stewart said the assorted weapons appeared to be more of the type that someone could buy at a Florida gun show rather than the standard weapons a government might want its allied forces to have.

    Also puzzling was the attempt to take weapons directly to a commercial airport, where customs inspectors and others could easily detect it.

    “Coming into an official port of entry with weapons to arm the enemy does not translate into a good strategy,” said Douglas Farah, a senior visiting fellow at the National Defense University’s Center For Strategic Research.
    Those who begin coercive elimination of dissent soon find themselves exterminating dissenters. Compulsory unification of opinion achieves only the unanimity of the graveyard.

    ~ Robert Jackson, Statesman (1892-1954)


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •