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Thread: The B in LGBT means there are only 2 genders

  1. #31
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roki View Post
    *inhales*

    "Abimegender: a gender that is profound, deep, and infinite; meant to resemble when one mirror is reflecting into another mirror creating an infinite paradox.

    Adamasgender: a gender which refuses to be categorized.

    Aerogender: a gender that is influenced by your surroundings.

    Aesthetigender: a gender that is derived from an aesthetic; also known as videgender.

    Affectugender: a gender that is affected by mood swings.

    Agender: the feeling of no gender/absence of gender or neutral gender.

    Agenderflux: being mostly agender except having small shifts towards other genders making them demigenders (because of the constancy of being agender).

    Alexigender: a gender that is fluid between more than one gender but the individual cannot tell what those genders are.

    Aliusgender: a gender which is removed from common gender descriptors and guidelines.

    Amaregender: a gender that changes depending on who you’re in love with.

    Ambigender: defined as having the feeling of two genders simultaneously without fluctuation; meant to reflect the concept of being ambidextrous, only with gender.

    Ambonec: identifying as both man and woman, yet neither at the same time.

    Amicagender: a gender that changes depending on which friend you’re with.

    Androgyne: sometimes used in the case of “androgynous presentation”; describes the feeling of being a mix of both masculine and feminine (and sometimes neutral) gender qualities.

    Anesigender: feeling like a certain gender yet being more comfortable identifying with another.

    Angenital: a desire to be without primary sexual characteristics, without necessarily being genderless; one may be both angenital and identify as any other gender alongside.

    Anogender: a gender that fades in and out but always comes back to the same feeling.

    Anongender: a gender that is unknown to both yourself and others.

    Antegender: a protean gender which has the potential to be anything, but is formless and motionless, and therefore, does not manifest as any particular gender.

    Anxiegender: a gender that is affected by anxiety.

    Apagender: a feeling of apathy towards ones gender which leads to them not looking any further into it.

    Apconsugender: a gender where you know what it isn’t, but not what it is; the gender is hiding itself from you...[cont'd]"
    Those aren't genders. Most of those are bullshit, and some are definitely mental illnesses. Others might be too, but I'd wager half of those are choices someone made to feel like they were special because they couldn't handle not being talented, smart, or attractive. Looks like something brainstormed on 4chan to troll people. Again.
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  2. #32
    Ieilaelite pensive_pilgrim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    It's interesting that there is this push to say there are only two genders in English speaking countries. The reason I find it interesting is because English is among the languages that doesn't use gender on everything--compare to Slavic and Romance language where a things like tables and chairs have a gender attached, where in English we'd call them neutral. We have three genders: male, female, neutral.

    Or perhaps it is precisely because English doesn't have strongly gendered nouns that English speakers are baffled by the idea of gender as a cultural construct?

    In languages where words are strongly gendered, that gendering isn't a sexual gender, it's that they have two different sets of behaviors which makes gender an easy metaphor to describe it, especially when most female names and female pronouns follow the rules of one group and most male names and male pronouns follow the rules of the other. It could just as easily have been Type A and Type B nouns, in much the same way that Japanese has two types of verb, but they aren't referred to as gendered--but then verbs don't have a clear path to sex the way nouns and pronouns do.

    I wouldn't be surprised if this was all some off kilter feedback loop from academic outrage at feminine surrender in languages that are strongly gendered.
    In English-speaking countries the whole concept of gender as something distinct from sex didn't exist before the 1950s. It was coined by a sexologist and became popular with feminists and academics in the 70s. Before then the word "gender" was pretty much only used in reference to grammar.

  3. #33
    unbeknownst Lilith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roki View Post
    How do they determine which sex is appropriate for a person with both reproductive parts (on the birth certificate)?
    The parents get to decide. One plumbing is more developed (dominant) than the other so it’s usually not that hard. I suppose the hermaprodite will decide which gender they identify more later in life.

  4. #34
    No Thank You Blorg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    It's interesting that there is this push to say there are only two genders in English speaking countries. The reason I find it interesting is because English is among the languages that doesn't use gender on everything--compare to Slavic and Romance language where a things like tables and chairs have a gender attached, where in English we'd call them neutral. We have three genders: male, female, neutral.

    Or perhaps it is precisely because English doesn't have strongly gendered nouns that English speakers are baffled by the idea of gender as a cultural construct?

    In languages where words are strongly gendered, that gendering isn't a sexual gender, it's that they have two different sets of behaviors which makes gender an easy metaphor to describe it, especially when most female names and female pronouns follow the rules of one group and most male names and male pronouns follow the rules of the other. It could just as easily have been Type A and Type B nouns, in much the same way that Japanese has two types of verb, but they aren't referred to as gendered--but then verbs don't have a clear path to sex the way nouns and pronouns do...
    As I suggested in my first post in this thread.

    This forum is ridiculous. The fact that human gender refers to cultural elements like femininity and masculinity isn't even a controversy among conservatives. See the Scalia quote.

    The majority of dictionaries written since the fifties will define it the same way.

    Quote Originally Posted by dictionary
    either of the two sexes (male and female), especially when considered with reference to social and cultural differences rather than biological ones.
    You don't have to like what the word signifies, but saying that all the dictionaries are wrong is ridiculous.

  5. #35
    No Thank You Blorg's Avatar
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    If you go to any dictionary on the first page of Google (I haven't checked further), or the OED, you'll see that they define human gender in terms of cultural influences. That's what distinguishes it from sex.

  6. #36
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blorg View Post
    If you go to any dictionary on the first page of Google (I haven't checked further), or the OED, you'll see that they define human gender in terms of cultural influences. That's what distinguishes it from sex.
    If you look at the definition you snagged, it doesn't mean what you say it does. Or rather, it isn't as restricted as people act like it is. Sex is one of the definitions for gender. Then there's the metaphorical use as in plumbing and electronics, grammar, and as synonyms for masculine or feminine. All of those are in play, so to say that gender isn't sex is wrong. My usage here is congruent, not in conflict with dictionary definitions.

    Here's the first dictionary definition that came up:

    Quote Originally Posted by Mirriam Webster
    Definition of gender (Entry 1 of 2)
    1a: a subclass within a grammatical class (such as noun, pronoun, adjective, or verb) of a language that is partly arbitrary but also partly based on distinguishable characteristics (such as shape, social rank, manner of existence, or sex) and that determines agreement with and selection of other words or grammatical forms
    b: membership of a word or a grammatical form in such a subclass
    c: an inflectional form (see INFLECTION sense 3a) showing membership in such a subclass
    2a: SEX sense
    1a the feminine gender
    b: the behavioral, cultural, or psychological traits typically associated with one sex
    c: GENDER IDENTITY
    Those seeking state driver's licenses in Massachusetts are closer to being able to designate their gender as "X" instead of "male" or "female." The state Senate has overwhelmingly approved a bill that would allow for the nonbinary designation on licenses.
    — Steve LeBlanc
    Emphasis mine. Note how the gender role type definition is separate?

    Now look at the definition you provided. The first half is about biological sex--and it specifies two.

    The use of gender for sex is a valid use. The use of gender as descriptive based on cultural ideas is also valid, but it smells like a conflation with the term gender roles, in the same foolish and muddlesome vein as conflating empathy with empathetic concern.


    But what does any of this have to do with the number of genders?

    I'm all on board for assaulting the idea of gender roles. I think they're foolish and needlessly limiting of what and who a person can be. But I'm not on board with fabricating a bunch of new genders so you can mix and match the role you want and pick that gender to declare yourself as. That's not a solution, that's a stupidity.
    People think they understand their own mortality, even when that understanding has just changed.

    --Meditations on Uncertainty Vol ξ(x)

  7. #37
    Senior Member Sinny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roki View Post
    *inhales*

    "Abimegender: a gender that is profound, deep, and infinite; meant to resemble when one mirror is reflecting into another mirror creating an infinite paradox.

    Adamasgender: a gender which refuses to be categorized.

    Aerogender: a gender that is influenced by your surroundings.

    Aesthetigender: a gender that is derived from an aesthetic; also known as videgender.

    Affectugender: a gender that is affected by mood swings.

    Agender: the feeling of no gender/absence of gender or neutral gender.

    Agenderflux: being mostly agender except having small shifts towards other genders making them demigenders (because of the constancy of being agender).

    Alexigender: a gender that is fluid between more than one gender but the individual cannot tell what those genders are.

    Aliusgender: a gender which is removed from common gender descriptors and guidelines.

    Amaregender: a gender that changes depending on who you’re in love with.

    Ambigender: defined as having the feeling of two genders simultaneously without fluctuation; meant to reflect the concept of being ambidextrous, only with gender.

    Ambonec: identifying as both man and woman, yet neither at the same time.

    Amicagender: a gender that changes depending on which friend you’re with.

    Androgyne: sometimes used in the case of “androgynous presentation”; describes the feeling of being a mix of both masculine and feminine (and sometimes neutral) gender qualities.

    Anesigender: feeling like a certain gender yet being more comfortable identifying with another.

    Angenital: a desire to be without primary sexual characteristics, without necessarily being genderless; one may be both angenital and identify as any other gender alongside.

    Anogender: a gender that fades in and out but always comes back to the same feeling.

    Anongender: a gender that is unknown to both yourself and others.

    Antegender: a protean gender which has the potential to be anything, but is formless and motionless, and therefore, does not manifest as any particular gender.

    Anxiegender: a gender that is affected by anxiety.

    Apagender: a feeling of apathy towards ones gender which leads to them not looking any further into it.

    Apconsugender: a gender where you know what it isn’t, but not what it is; the gender is hiding itself from you...[cont'd]"

    I'm not being sarcastic when I say humans are amazing. Look at how much effort and thought was put into that
    Omg, did you just make all that up?! Lol
    Why all As? Where's the Bs?

    That is ridiculous.
    I'd slap anyone who hurt my head with that bullshit.
    All truth passes through three stages: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as self-evident.


  8. #38
    Ieilaelite pensive_pilgrim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blorg View Post
    The majority of dictionaries written since the fifties will define it the same way.
    I would take that bet, since the first English speaking person to use the word gender to refer to something other than grammar did it in 1955.

    Also, all the dictionaries you're looking at define it as also meaning sex.

    There is a whole section on etymology on the Wikipedia page about gender. I'm surprised you're unfamiliar, with how you seem to be presenting yourself as an authority on the subject.

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