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Thread: OK, Now I need a monitor

  1. #1
    Senior Member Spartan26's Avatar
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    OK, Now I need a monitor

    So, my new computer has been working great, tyvm!! I do move around with it but I primarily want to sit at my desk and work. Even though it's 15", my eye sight is not what it used to be and I'd like to get a monitor to plug into. Ideally I'd like to go ~25". No more than 27" and at least "22.

    Again, not needed for gaming but editing video will be a thing. So, I guess color accuracy and picture clarity are important. No jitters or blocks when I stream vid either. Even though I plan on keeping it in the same place, I'd like to be able to adjust height/direction/tilt, etc. View angle I guess is something I should consider.

    Why would I, or would I need a curved screen? For the most part I plan on being just a wee bit more than arms' length from it. So I'm not sure what a curved screen would do??

    I have external speakers I currently plug into my computer but I suppose it wouldn't hurt to have an earphones jack on it. I don't think I need for it to have built-in speakers, (unless you say I do??)

    In case I get another, higher end monitor, I'd like for this one to be easily adaptable to work in tandem.

    I will spend a great deal of time in front of it so if there's something I should look for that'd save my eyes and not have me glowing in the dark, please include that info as well.

    I'm all but certain I'm going to purchase this through Amazon, as I have $150 in gift cards. This should also be considered my budget. Unless you say I definitely have to go $175-$180 floor, or something like that. Anything else I should consider that I haven't mentioned? Oh, what brands are good and which should be avoided? Is BenQ any good? I see AOC, Asus, Sceptre, Acer, LG, Viotec, any notable difference? Which generally has the better quality? I'm sure i'd take Samsung if I could find it but what else should be up there?

    Anything else I should know or consider??

    Thanks!!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Limes's Avatar
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    You're best off getting an old, high end 21" CRT, which should be next to nothing and will not jitter at all at over 85Hz

    Most budget LCDs are running 60Hz and something like 5-7ms response, which will cause blocking and lag on fast motion.

    It might be possible to get a smaller screen with better response times in that price range now, I haven't checked, that's your job, but it sounds like you might be better suited to Craigslist, looking for people offloading their old gaming screens who went bigger.

  3. #3
    Ieilaelite pensive_pilgrim's Avatar
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    This is what I have, got it maybe a year ago and it's fantastic. Looks like the slightly smaller 1080 version would fit into your budget. It's an IPS panel so view angles are great, and it tilts, 75 MHz and 1ms response. I did this get one in particular because of the FreeSync, which works with AMD graphics cards and is supposed to prevent screen tearing. If you have an NVIDIA GPU you might want something different, but if you're plugging in a laptop that should be irrelevant.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Spartan26's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Limes View Post
    You're best off getting an old, high end 21" CRT,
    Ouch! I didn't think my request was in the chaotic stupid range.

    Quote Originally Posted by Limes View Post
    Most budget LCDs are running 60Hz and something like 5-7ms response, which will cause blocking and lag on fast motion.

    It might be possible to get a smaller screen with better response times in that price range now, I haven't checked, that's your job,
    I guess what I want to know are what are the minimum numbers I should be looking for, regardless of price? It was about this time 11 years ago, I started looking for my first big screen flatscreen. Plasma was still a thing but warnings about them were coming out. One thing I looked for or ended up feeling it was pretty important was 120 Hz. I did get one with 120 HZ and never had an issue watching live sports. I got a Samsung and very happy with it for everything. My sister & bro in law around that time got a Sony. Maybe it was 6 mos to a year earlier. While their pic quality was fine, they did have issues when watching sports in HD and would often have to find the same channel in standard def to prevent the blocking and momentary freeze up. I don't know if they got new cable boxes or how the broadcasts were being delivered changed but eventually there was no issue. Theirs was 60 Hz. Soon of course came 240 Hz and I wanna say there's now 560?? but I don't really care about that. When it comes time for me to buy another TV, (that old Samsung is now in my bedroom), I'm sure it'll be fast enough. When I was in Best Buy a little over a week ago, I was surprised that most of the monitors were 60 Hz. I would've thought 120 would've been the lowest but most were operating at 60. I wasn't looking at 4K monitors but even the more expensive monitors on display were 60. Which begs the question, is Hz that important in computer monitors?

    I saw plenty of monitors in my budget that were listed under "gaming monitors". Some even listed 1ms response. I honestly have no idea what that means. Up until reading your post, I didn't know what other screens were coming in at. Plenty of them had 4 star and above consumer reviews. I just don't know if they're really any good. In the world of TVs, I know there are some brands that have the high numbers when it comes to the specs but still don't look that good. Vizio, to me, look somewhat artificial. I can't point to a scrolling issue or have seen blocks but even when a model is boasting higher numbers, there are other brands I'd choose over it.

    There were some that basically referred to themselves as "business monitors". I don't know if that's a step up from Home Monitors or not?? I don't know anything about gaming. Not about what format it enters the monitor, nothing about file/data size or pitfalls or specific needs or anything. Nothing I've seen really sets out to make a distinction for watching movies or youtube or streaming services compared to other computer needs the way gaming has vs other comp uses. I would imagine the information delivered is more complex for gaming than video. Most of the video I'd play, where it really made a difference, would be files from the harddrive, not so much realtime interaction coming over the web like gaming. I don't know if that makes any difference? I mean, I'll definitely watch video and stream online but I'm just looking for that to be smooth, it doesn't have to meet the specs of what plays off my blu ray player. It's when I'm editing video and playing back short segments and scenes, I'll need accuracy in time playback and in color & sharpness.

    When I was in Best Buy right before or right after the new year, they had some Samsung monitors on clearance for $89.99. I believe they were "22. Maybe 20. I was going to grab one cuz I figured it couldn't be too bad. But I didn't know enough. Years ago, I guess it was when I got my first flatscreen, I needed a receiver to run my old equipment through in my bedroom. They had some Harmon Kardons on sale for what I thought was ridiculously low price. Nothing wrong, they just had new models coming out. It fit my needs so bang I got it. Sound was great, no issues for a couple of years until I wanted to hook up my old PS2 to it. No USB ports. Then I realized why it was so cheap. I don’t want the equivalent of that to happen again. Pay a lesser amount for something that works well but already obsolete. I had seen plenty of $99 monitors even when not looking. I suspect there’d be an issue finding something decent in that range. But if you think I shouldn’t bother to look at anything under a certain price, let me know.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Spartan26's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pensive_pilgrim View Post
    This is what I have, got it maybe a year ago and it's fantastic. Looks like the slightly smaller 1080 version would fit into your budget. It's an IPS panel so view angles are great, and it tilts, 75 MHz and 1ms response. I did this get one in particular because of the FreeSync, which works with AMD graphics cards and is supposed to prevent screen tearing. If you have an NVIDIA GPU you might want something different, but if you're plugging in a laptop that should be irrelevant.
    Thanks so much. I don't mind going outside of my budget, especially if it was initially unreasonable. It's not just price, I think I'd actually prefer a 24" monitor to 27. Mainly for where it's placed and how I'll be using it. Mostly word processing which can sometimes look a bit awk on too large of s screen for me. Loses the intimacy or I feel like I'm being broadcast to have people look over my shoulder and read what I'm doing.

    I was surprised to see one has vga port. I would go with the $153 one since it has more ports and I'd only cut into that $40 savings with adapter cables anyway. One customer review said it isn't supported by Windows 10. Do you have Windows 10? Have you had any issues with it or finding the right drivers?

  6. #6
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spartan26 View Post
    Which begs the question, is Hz that important in computer monitors?
    Yes and no. Hz is your refresh rate, so it's also your max effective frame rate. Even if your media source is pumping out a billion frames per second, if your monitor is 60hz, it will display 60 frames per second--which is plenty for most people. It's more than the TV broadcasts you grew up with, and faster than most people like to see their shows--remember when Peter Jackson made a 60fps version of a Hobbit movie and everyone shit on it?

    At 60fps, assuming your media source supports it (lots of things are shot in 30, and as you know, the classic rate for movies is even less) things start to look more real, which coupled with higher definition means things look more fake--because they are fake. Props start being more obvious, and you can't get away with spraypainting a sweater and calling it chainmail. It makes things look more like plays than movies or tv shows.

    Personally, I like that shift. YMWV.

    I'm told it's good for watching sports, for about the same reason: it looks more like looking through a window than watching something on a screen.
    "Just because it's 2020 doesn't mean everyone has perfect vision."--catchphrase of a fictional comedian in some movie

  7. #7
    Senior Member Limes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spartan26 View Post
    Ouch! I didn't think my request was in the chaotic stupid range.



    <snip>
    Ok, sure, CRTs are pretty much dead technology as analogue, but the refresh rates on those trinitrons, especially the Eizo refined ones were off the charts. I practically gave away a 21" trinitron several years ago that was good up to 120Hz. I can see the screen being redrawn at 60Hz and can see up to 85Hz with my peripheral vision as flicker. For years as a field tech, I would tell people they were potentially tiring their eyes and causing migraine, sitting in a room with a 60Hz flourescent bulb and a 60Hz flickering screen.
    For some reason, I don't really see the redraw on an LCD until it tries to play smooth video, then a big chunk of screen will generally lag below the lower half as the lag/scan becomes apparent.

    By the way, don't compare Hz rates of digital computer screens to consumer TVs - they bullshit the refresh rate on the latter. They will do frame smoothing and call it 120Hz or 240Hz on a 60Hz panel. You have to really read into the specs and reviews to get the real numbers.

    I'm out of date on monitor specs TBH, so there are probably gamers on here that can give you better advice, but I'm pretty sure your answers are all on amazon with spec comparisons.

    Might as well invest in a good spec high refresh rate screen with very low response time, as large as you can afford as your screen is going to outlast anything you plug into it.

    There's probably a two year old, top spec 'gaming' panel going in your local classified ads as someone like myself wants to trade their 27" twins for a high spec 34"

  8. #8
    Ieilaelite pensive_pilgrim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spartan26 View Post
    Thanks so much. I don't mind going outside of my budget, especially if it was initially unreasonable. It's not just price, I think I'd actually prefer a 24" monitor to 27. Mainly for where it's placed and how I'll be using it. Mostly word processing which can sometimes look a bit awk on too large of s screen for me. Loses the intimacy or I feel like I'm being broadcast to have people look over my shoulder and read what I'm doing.

    I was surprised to see one has vga port. I would go with the $153 one since it has more ports and I'd only cut into that $40 savings with adapter cables anyway. One customer review said it isn't supported by Windows 10. Do you have Windows 10? Have you had any issues with it or finding the right drivers?
    Yeah I've used it with windows 10, and I don't think it needs any drivers. Monitors don't really need drivers, if it has the right type of physical port to plug into then you should be good to go.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Senseye's Avatar
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    I'm just a punter, but I've never been able to notice any of these flicker, motion blurring or what have you on any monitor of half decent quality I've ever watched. I've never noticed it ever, but maybe I have not seen bottom of the barrel monitors in action on a game or video - I think I have seen lots of low budget monitors in offices, but that is mainly text or static graphics.

    I think it is kind of an "audophile" kind of thing. Technically, there are lots of pros and cons, but can the average humanoid spot the difference between top of the line A+++ and just A? Probably not.

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