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Thread: Quarantine cooking

  1. #121
    Hasta Siempre Madrigal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starjots View Post
    I always start with a thai curry spice pack that looks lit. Dunno why I said lit. One package ingredients are listed as (this is as surprising to me as it is to you since I've never read it before) lemongrass, rice vinegar, galangal, virgin coconut oil, garlic, shallots, salt, and kaffir lime leaf. Then I add in a bunch of black pepper, curry, tumeric, and some garlic, coconut fat and coconut milk.
    Yeah, I haven't figured out where I can get a nice curry brand, and wonder if there is such a thing around here. Bet it really makes a difference. I knew about the lemongrass but that's also impossible to find here.

    I do use coconut milk or milk cream, and adding mango rolled in coconut to the rice lightens up the flavor.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    Heh. We've been here years now.

  2. #122
    malarkey oxyjen's Avatar
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    I just use prepackaged garam masala.

    I googled what is in it:
    Cinnamon sticks
    Green cardamom pods
    Black peppercorns
    Coriander seeds
    Cumin seeds
    Mace (a relative of nutmeg)
    Bay leaves

  3. #123
    Senior Member jyng1's Avatar
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    This is a chicken marinade recipe given to me by a Malaysian makan stall operator who sold chicken kebabs (it's for 500 gms/1 lb of chicken)

    2 cloves of garlic
    3/4 tbs of ginger
    1/2 cup of white vinegar
    1/3 cup of tomato puree
    1/2 tsp of cumin
    1/4 tsp of cloves
    1/2 tsp of nutmeg
    1/4 tsp of cardamon
    1/2 tsp of oregano
    1/3 tsp of chili powder
    3 to 4 tbsp of oil
    1/4 of lemon

    mix together and marinade chicken for min of 1 hour (then barbeque on a little charcoal bbq for the authentic makan stall experience).


    I made a cauliflower and chickpea korma curry the other day which I used half a jar of pre-made korma paste...

    2 tbsp of olive oil
    1 large onion, diced
    1 large carrot, peeled and diced
    3/4 tsp garam masala
    200 g of korma curry paste
    450-500g of cauliflower, chopped into small florets
    400g of chickpeas, drained and rinsed.
    1 1/2 cups of coconut cashew cream
    1 cup vegetable stock
    2 tbsp of tomato paste
    pinch of chilli flakes
    150 g of chopped or baby spinach
    juice of half a lemon


    Chuck onion and carrot in a large pan and fry until softened, then add curries and cook for a couple of minutes. Add cauliflower, chickpeas, cashew cream, stock, tomato puree and chilli. Cook for about 15 mins. Sit through spinach and lemon juice.


    Cashew cream is:
    1 cup of raw cashews (soaked for 6-8 hours)
    1 tsp of lemon juice
    1 1/2 cups of cold filtered water or almond milk

    Drain cashews and then shove in a blender and add water and lemon juice with a pinch of salt until nice and creamy.

    The lemon juice adds quite a bit to the flavour.

  4. #124
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
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    Chicken, whole
    One carrot
    One stalk of celery
    Chicken broth/stock
    Rice--about five cups
    3-5 habaneros
    One sweet onion

    Put a kettle of water to boil. While it's heating up, rinse your chicken and trim off the butt and fatty flaps near the butt. Put them aside, you will want them later.

    You'll want either a hook to hold the chicken, or you can do what I do, and use a broad but strong spoon or spatula that will fit inside the carcass and can support the weight. When the kettle boils, suspend the chicken over the sink, and carefully rinse the chicken with hot water, scalding it. You should see the skin tighten and contract. Make sure to rinse the outside completely. Then, take a palmful of salt and briskly scrub the skin. You aren't trying to scrub the skin off, but you are doing a little more than just rubbing it. I usually do one more quick rinse under the faucet, or skip that step entirely, but the result is better if don't skip that step. It's just not the best for cardiovascular health--though arguably, this isn't a dish for the weak of heart to begin with... but it is fucking delicious.

    I put my chicken in an instant pot. If you don't have one, or don't have a pressure cooker, or don't want to use a pressure cooker, you'll want to either use a slow cooker or a large enough baking dish to hold the chicken, covered, and up to it's keel in water. The water is crucial. Without it, you might as well just bake a chicken.

    Speaking of the water, I use chicken broth or chicken stock if I have it on hand instead. It makes for a more intense flavor and helps keep the chicken itself from becoming to bland.

    Clean your veggies, cut them in half or into batons if you're feeling industrious, then put them in the body cavity and put the chicken into your cooking vessel, then add your liquid until the chicken is almost completely submerged. Lift the chicken about a half an inch to make sure the liquid can get under it.

    Slice the caps off the habaneros and dispose of the seeds, then slice them into chunks, and add them to your water.

    I hit the poultry button on my IP. If you're baking in the oven, I'd go with 350F and cook until it's internal temp is at least 165F, preferably closer to 180F.

    While that's going on chop up your onion and carmelize half of it. slice up the fatty flaps, then put them, the butt, and about an eighth of a cup of water in another small frying pan--9" at the most. I'm guessing on the water, I don't measure it, I just put in enough that it covers the bottom of the pan and won't boil away immediately. Cook the chicken fat on low heat until the skin is golden brown, then add the rest of your onion. The goal is to render the chicken fat into a bit of schmalts, which takes about an hour, hour and a half. I usually stop when the chicken is done and my IP is safe to open. Your other onion should carmelize before this, so take it off the heat and put it aside.

    When the chicken is ready, remove it from the water and put it aside. It's a side dish. It will be a little bland save for the spice imparted by the pepper, but tasty enough you'll find yourself coming back to it until it's gone. But it is not the goal. It's a byproduct. Strain your chicken stock, then use it as the liquid to cook the rice. You don't have to use it all at once of course, but I usually end up with enough water for about 5 cups of rice.

    Strain your schmaltz into the rice pot, and add the carmelized onions. Cook the rice. Do whatever you want with the chicken. You can serve it alongside the rice, or not. The rice will stand on its own.

    The habaneros will give it a bit of spiciness, but you can kick that up a notch by adding a couple more peppers to the rice water. Don't use the peppers you used with the chicken. They will overcook and add bitterness.

    There's a lot of room for creativity. Anything you can add to the water will ultimately be taken up by the rice. If you go with aromatics, like ginger and coriander, add them to the schmaltz. I recommend adding the ginger around the same time as the onion, and when the sweetness blooms and reaches a nice heady fruit loop intensity, I add the coriander.
    "Just because it's 2020 doesn't mean everyone has perfect vision."--catchphrase of a fictional comedian in some movie

  5. #125
    Senior Member Tetris Champion notdavidlynch's Avatar
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    Then blast the chicken bones in the instant pot to make a broth. I set it to 4 hours so the bones start to get mushy.

  6. #126
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by notdavidlynch View Post
    Then blast the chicken bones in the instant pot to make a broth. I set it to 4 hours so the bones start to get mushy.
    Interesting. I haven't had luck double dipping on broth/stock--but don't think I cooked them that long. I assumed I must have gotten it all out in the initial stewing.
    "Just because it's 2020 doesn't mean everyone has perfect vision."--catchphrase of a fictional comedian in some movie

  7. #127
    Hasta Siempre Madrigal's Avatar
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    Okay, I think oxygen's is the most similar to what I do.

    I need something like lemon but when I use milk cream, the lemon would ruin it. I wonder if lemon skin would work. I just know something fresh/acidic needs to go in there. Also, jyng, 1/2 cup of vinegar?! Scary.

    Heph, that sounds like more than I could do with the tools at my disposal, but I'll keep it in mind for when I get a slow cooker. Also, I can't find habaneros. I can only use these:



    Green ají or something. There's an orange ají the peruvians use but it's awful:

    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    Heh. We've been here years now.

  8. #128
    Senior Member Tetris Champion notdavidlynch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    Interesting. I haven't had luck double dipping on broth/stock--but don't think I cooked them that long. I assumed I must have gotten it all out in the initial stewing.
    There are a lot of variables. But, generally, if there’s nothing but already cooked bones then you’ll want to add a bit of some kind of acid (I prefer apple cider vinegar) and pressure cook on high for longer than anything mentioned online.

    You’ll always end up with a broth that cools into a gel (collagen from connective tissues) and then a layer of fat that separates to the top.

    I’ll even use the leftover bones from eating just wings ... But the remains of a whole chicken is clearly the best option given the variety of bones and skin and other little leftover parts.

    You can also toss in all your vegetable trimmings. If you have any problem with bitterness, then reduce the time, I guess. I generally don’t care that much. Just don’t make the mistake of tossing in too many orange peels or something similarly crazy.

  9. #129
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
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    @notdavidlynch, thanks for the information! I'll give that a go sometime in the near future. Aspic is handy, and getting both a pot of stock and a pot of aspic from a chicken would be great.

    Quote Originally Posted by Madrigal View Post
    Also, I can't find habaneros. I can only use these:
    The key feature is you're making a component of capsaicin tea to be soaked up by the rice. I use habaneros because they punch above their weight, which means less work for me prepping them.

    I am sorry for your poor selection of peppers. That is truly tragic. I thought it was bad that I only have jalapenos, habaneros, serranos, anaheim, poblanos, and some thai spicy pepper. And of course, bell peppers. Not sure what else I want, but I know there are a lot more.
    "Just because it's 2020 doesn't mean everyone has perfect vision."--catchphrase of a fictional comedian in some movie

  10. #130
    Hasta Siempre Madrigal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    The key feature is you're making a component of capsaicin tea to be soaked up by the rice. I use habaneros because they punch above their weight, which means less work for me prepping them.

    I am sorry for your poor selection of peppers. That is truly tragic. I thought it was bad that I only have jalapenos, habaneros, serranos, anaheim, poblanos, and some thai spicy pepper. And of course, bell peppers. Not sure what else I want, but I know there are a lot more.
    I don't think the southern cone is the place to get peppers. The green ají is nice though, medium hotness so you can put it in a stew and still see it in there. One is enough, two is too much. I put them on toast and they usually make my eyes water or have me running for milk, but they're not hot enough to feel like work. Missing out on a lot of flavors though.

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