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Thread: Quarantine cooking

  1. #161
    Senior Member MarkovChain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sistamatic View Post
    My friends got me a book called "The Science of Cooking - by Stuart Farrimond" and it looks really good. I may have random cool stuff to say about cooking soon.
    If you like Science and Cooking you should definitely check out the Good Eats, with Alton Brown.



  2. #162
    Senior Member roki's Avatar
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    made some caramel apple pastries today

  3. #163
    Homo siderius Sistamatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roki View Post


    made some caramel apple pastries today
    Those look really good. Nice flaky looking dough!
    Insults are effective only where emotion is present. -- Spock, "Who Mourns for Adonais?" Stardate 3468.1.

    It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. -- Aristotle

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  4. #164
    Hasta Siempre Madrigal's Avatar
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    I grabbed all the pastry ingredients I had bought and donated them. It was a lot of stuff. I just can't really deal with making pastries right now.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    Heh. We've been here years now.

  5. #165
    Societal egress and ennui Catoptric's Avatar
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    Shepherds pie using stir fry vegetables, beer, "tomato sauce," beef and pork blend, two large potatos, an onion, fresh herbs (basil, parsley. . . ) and a salt/pepper/herb grinder filled with legal seasoning as well as pepper variety, and a specific parmasen-like cheese to blend into the potatos (which also includes a chunk of butter.)

    Also I've been stocking up on frozen roast kits that include vegetables. Occassionally buying stuff marked down and on clearance makes unusual combination (such as specialty bread like briochi which I'll make bread pudding out of.)

  6. #166
    Homo siderius Sistamatic's Avatar
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    Last sunday I attempted old school enchiritos from back when taco bell made everything from scratch, informed mostly by the fact that I worked at taco bell at that point in time.
    An enchirito in the 80s consisted of:

    1. a soft, thin, flour tortilla that was not of the same consistency as the ones used in burritos. Burrito tortillas were thicker and had been pan cooked so that they had the browned round spots where they bubble when you cook them. The ones we used for enchiritos were also used in cinnamon crispas, mexican pizzas, and taco lites. (in the 80's, lite didn't mean less calories) and we had a larger version used in making taco salad shells. I think they were uncooked rolled out tortillas. They were quartered and fried for crispas, fried in a fold form for taco lite, fried flat for mexican pizzas, and the big ones were fried in a large bowl form to make the taco salad shells. I made my tortillas from scratch out of all purpose flour, salt, lard, and water.

    2. refried beans: in 1987, taco bell got 50 pound bags of dry pinto beans which were cooked in a pressure cooker with a proprietary premixed spice packet and mushed using a long blender attachment on a black and decker drill. They were then refried in large pans using lard, then placed on the food assembly line. I guessed at the spices ... we conjectured endlessly about the secret proprietary spices back then ... and went with onion powder, salt, cumin, and a little bit of garlic salt. I made my beans in my instant pot, mushed them in a nutribullet, and refried them in a cast iron skillet. Today taco bell gets bags of premade refried beans that they thaw and put on the assembly line.

    3. ground beef: in 1987, rather than the precooked frozen meat in a plastic sack that taco bell uses now, we got huge boxes of 80/20 ground beef, fresh, still red, never frozen. We browned it, added water and a proprietary spice premix pack, and then cooked the water back down to stew the spices in. I used the same method, but in a skillet instead of a giant commercial kitchen pan, and guessed at the spices. Masa for texture, chili powder, cayenne, garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, seasoning salt, sugar, beef bullion, and cumin. I may have added a touch too much cayenne trying for that teeny bit of brisance that old school taco bell meat seemed to have. (chili being a low boom compared to the "pow" of cayenne.)

    4. Red sauce: old school taco bell red sauce came in big cans. We opened it and heated it and put it on the food assembly line. It was just plain old red chili based red sauce, as opposed to what seems to have a tomato base in today taco bell. Any red chili based enchilada sauce will do. Taco bell used mild, but I used hot because that's what I keep in my cabinets for making enchiladas.

    5. White onions: Never use yellow onions for Mexican food. In 1987, taco bell didn't get the precut slimy bags of onions they use today, they got boxes of fresh veggies that they cut up in the store. I minced a white onion for use on my enchiritos.

    6. Black olives: in 1987 we got cans of whole black olives and sliced them in the store and put them on the line. They no longer serve black olives at taco bell.

    7. Shredded Colby cheese: exactly what it sounds like. At taco bell 1987 we got our cheese in giant blocks that we cut with a wire and fed into a hand crank cheese grater.

    Assembly. Smear a dollop of refried beans onto your tortilla, add a dollop of cooked meat, a sprinkling of white onions, roll it up, and place it on a tray. Cover in red sauce, sprinkle with cheese and put three black olive slices on top. At taco bell 1987, the next step would have been to stick it in the steamer tray, which would steam the crap out of it for about 15 seconds, melting the cheese and making it gooey and warm, and cooking the uncooked flour tortilla. I don't have a steamer tray. I toyed with the idea of using a curtain steamer, but ultimately I just used convection broil in my toaster oven. Steam would have been better, but I don't really see how to achieve the instant high steam
    volume that the contraption we used at taco bell delivered without additional equipment.

    At taco bell, sour cream was an option, and it was the option I always went with. At taco bell 1987, we loaded our sour cream into these stainless steel caulking guns, but for my enchiritos I used a spoon.

    All in all, it was a success. Really yummy. But it was a fuckton of work too. I feel like the sauce was maybe a bit off...like maybe the og sauce used a different, slightly brighter chili type? I need to work on the tortilla some...I think I need to roll them a bit thinner. But the burrito flours from the cooked tortillas left over in the batch were probably the best ever. They almost had a phyllo dough texture. I made and froze a pile of different burritos with my leftover ingredients.
    Last edited by Sistamatic; 08-10-2020 at 05:02 PM.
    Insults are effective only where emotion is present. -- Spock, "Who Mourns for Adonais?" Stardate 3468.1.

    It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. -- Aristotle

    This SEP field is glorious!

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