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Thread: Google Lens - Identify Local Plant Species, Fungus, and Insects

  1. #1
    Societal egress and ennui Catoptric's Avatar
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    Google Lens - Identify Local Plant Species, Fungus, and Insects

    Google Lens is a free app that works surprisingly well.

    Since I started gardening I've had to study up on what plants are sprouting, and what plants that grow wild are important to keep track of (to remove or place in a pot.) The same for insects that need to be monitored (which is how I identified a "soldier fly" that resembles a wasp that posses zero threat and is beneficial to soil development in compost, and an "army cutworm" that is very invasive and can destroy a lot of plants in a matter of hours.)

    Two plants that I believed were fern related (they both resemble fern fronds that close up at night--referred to as Nyctinasty--which may just be an adaptation to how much light is received, perhaps to help it survive low light conditions and to enable for other leaf fronds to get more light.)

    Mimosa tenuiflora (aka Jurema and used in DMT rituals in Mexico)
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Mimosa_tenuiflora

    Phyllanthus urinaria (aka "Gale of the Wind," or Stonebreaker due to it's effect on kidneystones, is found throughout the world and used especially in India as a medicinal herb, which also resembles Mimosa though has larger leaves in place of fronds.)
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phyllanthus_urinaria

    To give some example of Mimosa


    I had two instances in which cedar seedlings sprouted right next to a mimosa and phylanthus, and I've considered turning them into bonsai (though I don't think I would be good at forming the plant appearance, and the shape may be difficult to maintain size.)

    Also a clover plant with yellow flowers called Wood Sorrel, or Oxalis stricta


    A few other similar plants I'm still trying to determine.

    ********

    A small atypical orange and a berry plant I tossed into a pot started sprouting and then seperated accordingly. I guessed as to what they were but since I didn't see any leaves at the time, was able to determine:

    The Sugarberry (date-like cherry fruits that are eaten more by deer and other wild animals. This should become a very large tree.)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtis_occidentalis
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtis_laevigata

    The orange (eventually grow to have large thorns on it and grows more like a bush than a tree.) It was sourced from the border of Lousiana and Texas where it would have been probably used during the 19th century to enclose cattle, much like a fenced area. This would have been at a time when Chinese labor was used to build the railroad system and probably introduced the Orange to the US.)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trifoliate_orange

    For some time I thought it was bitter orange (Citrus aurantium, aka Seville Orange introduced to Spain by the Moors,) though instead it should be more like a lemon with a ton of seeds. The Citrus Aurantium matches the region history.

    *************

    Wild fungus
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stemonitis_splendens

    Inkycap
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coprinopsis_atramentaria

    Dog Vomit slime mold
    https://www.thespruce.com/identifyin...fungus-2539510

    Wood Ear Mushroom (Auricularia auricula-judae)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auricu...auricula-judae

    An inoculated fungal spore colony from shitake also grew

    I noticed with mushrooms that if they grow too fast the stems tend to be hollow and also curl up and split from the tops of the stems. This kind of confused me and caused me to assume that a ribbonlike mushroom had grown.

    With the Google Lens app, you can take existing photos taken and upload them, and zoom in on the subject in particular.
    Last edited by Catoptric; 06-15-2020 at 03:09 AM.

  2. #2
    Member Works's Avatar
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    I mostly use it to prove to my wife that not every plant is poison ivy.

  3. #3
    Societal egress and ennui Catoptric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Works View Post
    I mostly use it to prove to my wife that not every plant is poison ivy.
    The more I use the app, I realize it's more likely to have the opposite intended effect of confirming which plant is identified. Too often Google's search algorithm gets in the way of getting an accurate confirmation, and it seems to take random search entries (such as Yerba Mate tea) and tries to suggest it's that or something else.

  4. #4
    TJ TeresaJ's Avatar
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    I use the iNaturalist seek app, which is really cool.

    I did one time use it to identify Chicken of the Woods, which I subsequently harvested, cooked, and ate, because it didnít have any dangerous lookalikes. It was delicious.

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