Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 60

Thread: Who here has tried writing a book?

  1. #21
    Aporia Dysphoria Dirac's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    882
    Quote Originally Posted by Polemarch View Post
    The project isn't doomed to failure - it's all a matter of you making time to do it, putting in the work, and making it a priority. So I'd just pose this question: Do you want to write a book, more than you want to accomplish other things? Are you willing to make it a priority?
    I'm fairly committed now. I'm about to finish the job I've been working on, and am not planning on getting another one so I will be treating this as my new job. This is my current number 1 priority.

    Quote Originally Posted by ACow View Post
    That being said, i'm debating about whether to try fiction again now....i'm bored, and I always wanted to in some respect...
    You should do it. Misery loves company or something.


    Quote Originally Posted by Robcore View Post
    I'm converting a screenplay I wrote into a novel. It is a really slow process, but incredibly rewarding. I'd rather take forever to write it and just enjoy the whole process than push hard to make sure it gets finished. Thoughts of finishing seem to inhibit creativity...so I just try to write it for its own sake.
    I find that if I don't tell myself to get it finished then I just don't work on it enough. Thoughts of finishing make me feel more creative, because it forces me to think deeply about the story-as-a-whole, and solve all of those problems that I'm too lazy to.

    Quote Originally Posted by Makers!* View Post
    Why does everyone start with novels.. what about short stories? You should really start with short stories.

    And no, I'm not a writer. I'm just sayin.
    I have written some short stories.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lunar Delta View Post
    I just have the same problem Ptah does: I just don't think I am capable of writing a good narrative.
    Makers has a good point in that starting with short stories will help you with the ability to just write. It's easy to churn out a few hundred words of flash fiction and it might help you get in the groove.

    Quote Originally Posted by ciphersort View Post
    I've started a few, but with each attempt after banging out a few pages and deciding to look over what I had created I was all like... tldr.
    I'm worried about this happening to me too, but I believe in the story and if it does I'll just keep rewriting the same one over and over lol.

    Quote Originally Posted by skip View Post
    I've written several but I've never tried to get anything published.
    Why not?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    -and the only thing worse than that is trying to market poetry.
    Yeah my girlfriend is a poet. Poor her.

  2. #22
    BeyondUrLatestAdCampaigns ciphersort's Avatar
    Type
    iNtp
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    445
    Quote Originally Posted by Dirac View Post
    I'm worried about this happening to me too, but I believe in the story and if it does I'll just keep rewriting the same one over and over lol
    It's a good plan... at least it works for me when programming or composing music.

    Quote Originally Posted by flurps View Post
    Little did I know that reading turns out to be way more rewarding when you're lazy as fuck.
    hahaha - Truth.

    Quote Originally Posted by flurps View Post
    Somebody's gotta write em, though. Kudos.
    I suppose if I didn't have other creative outlets I would put more effort into writing.

  3. #23
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Ceti Alpha V
    Posts
    12,207
    Quote Originally Posted by Makers!* View Post
    I own ten collections of short stories, but it's also my job to study this stuff—being an English student and all. So, I'm not in disagreement with you that books get pushed quicker then story collections. In fact, I know that's the case. The literary world, like any other, is rife with elbow rubbing, who-you-know type of games. In large part due to the flood of Creative Writing students, who've dropped 60 grand on a degree and expect somthing out of it. I'm not exactly bashing the route they take. You can learn alot through a formal education. But the downside is that there are truly gifted writers who don't have the money or connections, and so get lost in the wake.
    Don't get me wrong: I fucking adore short stories. My love of short stories began with my reading my father's back catalog of Fantasy and Science Fiction and Asimov's Science Fiction magazines. I read the Thieve's World mosaic novels like a gourmand--seeking out favored authors who's characters most appealed to me (though at the time I didn't realize I was missing the overarching story reading that way). And I read lots of collected short stories--though perhaps that doesn't do my interest in short stories justice.

    I guess I really began reading short stories with two well known anthologies: The Bible, and Grimm's Fairy Tales (pre-sanitized, dictionary of fantastical and gory stories, about a dozen variants of each, all in one hardback tome). I would also consider Choose Your Own Adventure books to fit that groove--and of course, Sherlock Holmes and Herbert--even Roald Dahl's many wonderfully savage books are more or less short story collections because of how well defined his chapters were.

    But there was a time beginning near middle school when I began to shun the short story in favour of the novel, and it wasn't until I was working so much the only time I had to read was that which I snatched for myself pooping that I came to truly understand how great the short story format is--and what a pain in the ass wordy novelettes are.

    I do seek out short story anthologies very deliberately, which is why I was disheartened to learn I was in the minority. Though some of the best are those that are sneaky and lean in the direction of a novel. Mosaic novels aren't common but they are cool as hell. And then there's stuff like The Witcher series, which isn't getting the translation attention it deserves because the books are just collections of short stories, like collected legends about the titular character, bound together by chronological ordering. Really, quite a cool way to deliver a story I think.

    I have some hope for the future of semi-self-publishing though. One of my favorite rising authors of dystopian fiction has risen to success self-publishing short stories and then omnibus's of them on the Kindle. It's like a form of serial, but without the definite schedule.

    Then there's the rise of the serial on the Kindle. It adds a gatekeeper of sorts back in, because you actually have some vetting taking place before you can launch a serial on the Kindle. Meanwhile, it's something you can actually do! I think that's great, and I hope it becomes a successful trend for more people. I mean, there are some really great books out there that were originally serials. Two that come immediately to mind are Ender's Game and The Count of Monte Cristo.
    For some, "how", not "why", is the fundamental unit of measure for curiosity. This divergence is neither parallel, nor straight. Where one might have a "why?-5" problem, it might only be a "how?-2" question. But then, there are also many things where the "why?" is immediately obvious but the "how?" is best measured in centuries of perpetual wonder. Both approaches have their drawbacks.

    If one is superior, the other is unaware of it.

    --Meditations on Uncertainty Vol ξ(x)

  4. #24
    Member Aurast's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    501
    I wouldn't say I've ever tried writing a book, but I have tried writing, and a couple of times made nontrivial progress towards a finished novel. My record is about 25,000 words.

    Technically I consider my writing to be pretty good but I feel like I lack some ingredients at the plot inception stage.

  5. #25
    Senior Member skip's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Tatooine
    Posts
    1,324
    Quote Originally Posted by Dirac View Post
    Why not?
    One uses copyrighted characters. The others I didn't think were good enough for publication but I got enormous satisfaction from writing them anyway.
    Yes, I smell like a horse. No, I don't consider that a problem.

  6. #26
    Sysop Ptah's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    4,502
    Quote Originally Posted by Sistamatic View Post
    I'd wager most of us wannabe novelists have big piles of short stories on our hard drives... just sayin
    It's true. I produce reams of short stories. Those I can write with more ease, partially because I just write them for fun, not for an audience, per se.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aurast View Post
    Technically I consider my writing to be pretty good but I feel like I lack some ingredients at the plot inception stage.
    I think I have the opposite problem. I fall apart at the narrative writing part, but feel competent at all the rest leading up to it.

  7. #27
    Aporia Dysphoria Dirac's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    882
    Quote Originally Posted by skip View Post
    One uses copyrighted characters. The others I didn't think were good enough for publication but I got enormous satisfaction from writing them anyway.
    Did you ever consider trying to get them published? Maybe an editor would be able to polish them up well enough?

  8. #28
    Member
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    194
    I write nonfiction. I started with the idea of writing a Kindle book I had no intention of printing. After I published it, I had a lot of requests for a printed version, so I printed it. I never considered doing business with a publisher, because I wanted to do it myself. And maybe no publisher would take me anyway. And then many people that would benefit from the book would never have the chance.

    Even if ebooks are not very popular in my country, publishing through Amazon is so comfortable it's worth it. The profit margins are high, I don't need to worry about shipping books, about stock, about covering printing costs... Sometimes I even forget I have a book to sell. Then I get a deposit in my account.

  9. #29
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Ceti Alpha V
    Posts
    12,207
    Quote Originally Posted by mondschein View Post
    Even if ebooks are not very popular in my country, publishing through Amazon is so comfortable it's worth it. The profit margins are high, I don't need to worry about shipping books, about stock, about covering printing costs... Sometimes I even forget I have a book to sell. Then I get a deposit in my account.
    Erh... I don't know the state of publishing houses in your country, but a properly published author from a legit publishing house doesn't worry about those things. That's the whole purpose of going to a publishing house in the first place--and the reason why they vet books before publishing. They're covering those costs.

    From what I've read, the author's primary responsibility once contracting with a publisher is to do everything they can to help market the book. Unless they had tremendous faith in you (which usually means you've sold well before) their budget for your book is pretty much going to be print and distribution costs. That leaves the author (or author's agent if they have one) to set up marketing opportunities like book signing events and advertisements.

    Now, that doesn't mean there's any shortage of self-publishing houses where you will end up worrying about all those things you talk about. They're referred to as vanity publishing, and yeah, that will be expensive and the profit margin on the book will be very very thin. The difference is how you're getting paid. Published authors get royalties. Vanity published authors are getting profits--assuming they are miraculously successful. But the vanity publishing houses love the model because unlike normal publishing houses, all books are profitable for them.
    For some, "how", not "why", is the fundamental unit of measure for curiosity. This divergence is neither parallel, nor straight. Where one might have a "why?-5" problem, it might only be a "how?-2" question. But then, there are also many things where the "why?" is immediately obvious but the "how?" is best measured in centuries of perpetual wonder. Both approaches have their drawbacks.

    If one is superior, the other is unaware of it.

    --Meditations on Uncertainty Vol ξ(x)

  10. #30
    Senior Member skip's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Tatooine
    Posts
    1,324
    Quote Originally Posted by Dirac View Post
    Did you ever consider trying to get them published? Maybe an editor would be able to polish them up well enough?
    I'm afraid they'd have to be "mainstreamed" in order to sell and I couldn't do that to them.
    Yes, I smell like a horse. No, I don't consider that a problem.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-09-2014, 01:07 AM
  2. Writing a story, tear it up and tell me why/how it sucks please
    By Dream Eater in forum Projects & Creativity
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-07-2014, 05:20 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •