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Thread: Tell me about resin

  1. #1
    Senior Member skip's Avatar
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    Tell me about resin

    I want to buy a backyard composter as a gift. It needs to be easy to tumble (she's older so she can't easily roll a trash can around her backyard or twist a stirrer). It also needs to be off of the ground so 1) she can reach it easily and 2) it doesn't just end up feeding roaches and pack rats.

    I like this kind but those always look to me like they're made for a shady backyard in Illinois or something, not for baking in our hot summer temps which top 118F outdoors. I have no idea how hot it could get inside the resin composter. Could heated chemicals from the resin leak into the compost inside? That would defeat the purpose of her lovely organic garden (which inspired me to start my own garden).

    Yes, I smell like a horse. No, I don't consider that a problem.

  2. #2
    a fool on a journey pensive_pilgrim's Avatar
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    I doubt it. 120 degrees F isn't really that hot. Without knowing exactly what you mean by "resin", I found this, which seems to indicate that the lowest melting temps for most plastics is over 300 degrees F. I'm no expert but I'd be more worried about whether it's vented.

    Also, I've seen ones that have the chamber mounted on a rotating mechanism with gears and a handle to make turning it easier. Might be nice for an older person like you describe.

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    Senior Member skip's Avatar
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    Does the resin have to actually melt for it to affect the contents of the composter? What about fumes? It'll be much, much hotter than 120F inside the locked composter.

    I'll look for the geared ones, that's a good idea.
    Yes, I smell like a horse. No, I don't consider that a problem.

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    Persona Oblongata OrionzRevenge's Avatar
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    Well, I thought I would get lucky easy...but

    I used to work in an environmental lab, and yes chem leeching could be a consideration with certain types of plastics/resins


    Spoiler: Cautions & CODES
    Why You Should Check the Resin Identification Code

    It is possible to seriously cut back on the amount of plastic in your life, which I strongly recommend and give tips for below. However, for the plastics you do use itís important to be aware of the risks they pose.

    This can be determined through a classification system called the Resin Identification Code, which is the number printed on the bottom of most plastic bottles and food containers. It describes what kind of plastic resin the product is made out of.

    The featured article2 compiled a breakdown of what each Resin Identification Code means, which you can use to help you make informed decisions on your plastic usage. As youíll read below, you should generally avoid plastics labeled #7, #3 or #6, while those that may be somewhat safer include #1, #2, #4 and #5.


    Getting to Know Your Plastics: What the 7 Numbers Mean

    Plastic #1: Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET)

    Typically used to make bottles for soft drinks, water, juice, mouthwash, sports drinks and containers for condiments like ketchup, salad dressing, jelly and jam, PET is considered safe, but it can actually leach the toxic metal antimony, which is used during its manufacture.

    One study that looked at 63 brands of bottled water produced in Europe and Canada found concentrations of antimony that were more than 100 times the typical level found in clean groundwater (2 parts per trillion).3

    It also found that the longer a bottle of water sits on a shelf -- in a grocery store or your refrigerator -- the greater the dose of antimony present. It is believed that the amount of antimony leeching from these PET bottles differs based on exposure to sunlight, higher temperatures, and varying pH levels.

    Brominated compounds have also been found to leach into PET bottles.4 Bromine is known to act as a central nervous system depressant, and can trigger a number of psychological symptoms such as acute paranoia and other psychotic symptoms.

    Plastic #2: High Density Polyethylene (HDPE)

    HDPE, which is considered a low-hazard plastic, is often used for milk, water and juice bottles, as well as bottles for cleaning supplies and shampoo. Itís also used to make grocery bags and cereal box liners. HDPE (like most plastics) has been found to release estrogenic chemicals.

    In one study, 95 percent of all plastic products tested were positive for estrogenic activity, meaning they can potentially disrupt your hormones and even alter the structure of human cells, posing risks to infants and children.5 In this particular study, even products that claimed to be free of the common plastic toxicant bisphenol-A (BPA) still tested positive for other estrogenic chemicals.

    Plastic #3: Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)

    PVC plastic can be rigid or flexible, and is commonly found in bags for bedding, shrink wrap, deli and meat wrap, plastic toys, table cloths and blister packs used to store medications.

    PVC contains toxic chemicals including DEHP, a type of phthalate used as a plastics softener. Phthalates are one of the groups of "gender-bending" chemicals causing males of many species to become more female. These chemicals have disrupted the endocrine systems of wildlife, causing testicular cancer, genital deformations, low sperm counts and infertility in a number of species, including polar bears, deer, whales and otters, just to name a few.

    Scientists believe phthalates are responsible for a similar pattern of adverse effects in humans as well. If your home contains soft, flexible plastic flooring, such as vinyl or those padded play-mat floors for kids (often used in day cares and kindergartens, too), thereís a good chance it is also made from toxic PVC. PVC flooring has been linked to chronic diseases including allergies, asthma and autism.

    Plastic #4: Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE)

    Another plastic that is considered a low hazard, LDPE is used in bags for bread, newspapers, fresh produce, household garbage and frozen foods, as well as in paper milk cartons and hot and cold beverage cups. While LDPE does not contain BPA, it may pose risks of leaching estrogenic chemicals, similar to HDPE.

    Plastic #5: Polypropylene (PP)

    PP plastic is used to make containers for yogurt, deli foods, medications and takeout meals. While polypropylene is said to have a high heat tolerance making it unlikely to leach chemicals, at least one study found that PP plastic ware used for laboratory studies did leach at least two chemicals.6

    Plastic #6: Polystyrene (PS)

    Polystyrene, also known as Styrofoam, is used to make cups, plates, bowls, take-out containers, meat trays and more. Polystyrene is known to leach styrene,7 which can damage your nervous system and is linked to cancer, into your food. Temperature has been found to play a role in how much styrene leaches from polystyrene containers, which means using them for hot foods and beverages (such as hot coffee in a polystyrene cup) may be worst of all.

    Plastic #7: Other

    This is a catch-all designation used to describe products made from other plastic resins not described above, or those made from a combination of plastics. Itís difficult to know for sure what types of toxins may be in #7 plastics, but thereís a good chance it often contains BPA or the new, equally concerning chemical on the block in the bisphenol class known as Bisphenol-S (BPS).

    BPA and BPS are endocrine disrupters, which means they mimic or interfere with your body's hormones and "disrupts" your endocrine system. The glands of your endocrine system and the hormones they release are instrumental in regulating mood, growth and development, tissue function, metabolism, as well as sexual function and reproductive processes.

    Some of the greatest concern surrounds early-life, in utero exposure to bisphenol compounds, which can lead to chromosomal errors in your developing fetus, causing spontaneous miscarriages and genetic damage. But evidence is also very strong showing these chemicals are influencing adults and children, too, and leading to decreased sperm quality, early puberty, stimulation of mammary gland development, disrupted reproductive cycles and ovarian dysfunction, cancer and heart disease, among numerous other health problems.

    For instance, research has found that "higher BPA exposure is associated with general and central obesity in the general adult population of the United States,"8 while another study found that BPA is associated not only with generalized and abdominal obesity, but also with insulin resistance, which is an underlying factor in many chronic diseases.9



    And looking at the Picture I can clearly see the recycle triangle wherein you'd expect to see the number code.

    I figured I'd get lucky being able to zoom in the display pic on home depots website and read the code....doesn't appear to be there.

    I read the specs at a bunch of sites and the company site...no dice

    I DLed the Manual

    http://www.suncast.com/instructions/EN/tcb6800.pdf

    Nope.

    1-800-846-2325

    They keep banker's hours.

    Given the nature of the product, it seems suspicions that the resin code isn't given.

    Also, maybe about a quarter of the reviews where about hard to assemble or mechanical failure (metal parts)

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Suncast-T...specifications

    I tried.

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