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Thread: Disneyland/world/universe

  1. #1
    NC-17 Delilah's Avatar
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    Disneyland/world/universe

    Whatever.
    What is it about those places that make otherwise, seemingly intelligent and even cool as hell people get eating-mashed-peas-clapping-like-a-seal-and-pissing-themselves stupid?
    I have a few friend-type people that I actually objectively think highly of, that are disturbingly crazy about the whole dinseyland shit, they go on trips there as often as possible, talk endlessy about it and just eat it all up like gruel in a third world buffet.
    I have never had any interest, and when I say never, I mean when I was maybe about 10, tops, my Dad (an over the raod trucker) was heading to Cali where one of the disney places is located and wanted to take the family.
    I remember my folks asking me if I wanted to go.
    I opted to stay at my Grandmas for the couple of weeks they were gone.

    Yeah. That little interest that even as a kid I didn't want to deal with that shit.

    Can anyone explain this phenomena to me?
    You're using big words right now that you don't know the meaning of and you're capitalizing them. You shouldn't do that. ~Osito

  2. #2
    Member rhinosaur's Avatar
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    Generally I find it to be way too expensive, and too much walking/standing around in the blistering hot Florida weather. Some of the rides can be interesting, and the food at Epcot is good. But overall there are better things to do in FL. Haven't been to the one in Cali.

  3. #3
    NC-17 Delilah's Avatar
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    If cost weren't an issue would it interest you? What if the lines weren't an issue?
    You're using big words right now that you don't know the meaning of and you're capitalizing them. You shouldn't do that. ~Osito

  4. #4
    Global Moderator Polemarch's Avatar
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    I can't personally relate to it. Disney is abhorrent to me. It seems to all be based on bullshit fantasies that don't appeal to me in any way. Add to that the fact that the whole place is designed to force you to spend ridiculous amounts of money for substandard things, and wait in line to compete for substandard experiences. I honestly don't get it, and can in no way shed any light on this at all.

    On the other hand, I love going to Las Vegas - and you could argue that in some respects it's very similar. But the theme of Las Vegas is drinking, sex, gambling, and entertainment. The theme of Disney appears to be cheesiness.
    We didn't land on Plymouth Rock. Plymouth Rock landed on us.

  5. #5
    I do NOT understand the appeal. Nor do I understand the appeal of most things that people spend time and money on. Alcohol, yes. Books, of course. I'm a sucker for some frou-frou stuff (yes, I will pay people to massage me or do my nails or whatever). And I will pay for tickets--for a plane/train/boat, for a concert, for a museum. But collecting stuff or spending on cheesy-ass experiences just makes me sad. No, I will not pay you to yodel for me, thanks. Yes, I know we're in the fake Alps.

  6. #6
    objective-means-purpose wise fool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jean Baudrillard
    THE HYPERREAL AND THE IMAGINARY
    Disneyland is a perfect model of all the entangled orders of simulacra. It is first of all a play of illusions and phantasms: the Pirates, the Frontier, the Future World, etc. This imaginary world is supposed to ensure the success of the operation. But what attracts the crowds the most is without a doubt the social microcosm, the religious, miniaturized pleasure of real America, of its constraints and joys. One parks outside and stands in line inside, one is altogether abandoned at the exit. The only phantasmagoria in this imaginary world lies in the tenderness and warmth of the crowd, and in the sufficient and excessive number of gadgets necessary to create the multitudinous effect. The contrast with the absolute solitude of the parking lot - a veritable concentration camp - is total. Or, rather: inside, a whole panoply of gadgets magnetizes the crowd in directed flows - outside, solitude is directed at a single gadget: the automobile. By an extraordinary coincidence (but this derives without a doubt from the enchantment inherent to this universe), this frozen, childlike world is found to have been conceived and realized by a man who is himself now cryogenized: Walt Disney, who awaits his resurrection through an increase of 180 degrees centigrade.

    Thus, everywhere in Disneyland the objective profile of America, down to the morphology of individuals and of the crowd, is drawn. All its values are exalted by the miniature and the comic strip. Embalmed and pacified. Whence the possibility of an ideological analysis of Disneyland (L. Marin did it very well in Utopiques, jeux d'espace [Utopias, play of space]): digest of the American way of life, panegyric of American values, idealized transposition of a contradictory reality. Certainly. But this masks something else and this "ideological" blanket functions as a cover for a simulation of the third order: Disneyland exists in order to hide that it is the "real" country, all of "real" America that is Disneyland (a bit like prisons are there to hide that it is the social in its entirety, in its banal omnipresence, that is carceral). Disneyland is presented as imaginary in order to make us believe that the rest is real, whereas all of Los Angeles and the America that surrounds it are no longer real, but belong to the hyperreal order and to the order of simulation. It is no longer a question of a false representation of reality (ideology) but of concealing the fact that the real is no longer real, and thus of saving the reality principle.

    The imaginary of Disneyland is neither true nor false, it is a deterrence machine set up in order to rejuvenate the fiction of the real in the opposite camp. Whence the debility of this imaginary, its infantile degeneration. This world wants to be childish in order to make us believe that the adults are elsewhere, in the "real" world, and to conceal the fact that true childishness is everywhere - that it is that of the adults themselves who come here to act the child in order to foster illusions as to their real childishness. Disneyland is not the only one, however. Enchanted Village, Magic Mountain, Marine World: Los Angeles is surrounded by these imaginary stations that feed reality, the energy of the real to a city whose mystery is precisely that of no longer being anything but a network of incessant, unreal circulation - a city of incredible proportions but without space, without dimension. As much as electrical and atomic power stations, as much as cinema studios, this city, which is no longer anything but an immense scenario and a perpetual pan shot, needs this old imaginary like a sympathetic nervous system made up of childhood signals and faked phantasms.

    Disneyland: a space of the regeneration of the imaginary as waste-treatment plants are elsewhere, and even here. Everywhere today one must recycle waste, and the dreams, the phantasms, the historical, fairylike, legendary imaginary of children and adults is a waste product, the first great toxic excrement of a hyperreal civilization. On a mental level, Disneyland is the prototype of this new function. But all the sexual, psychic, somatic recycling institutes, which proliferate in California, belong to the same order. People no longer look at each other, but there are institutes for that. They no longer touch each other, but there is contactotherapy. They no longer walk, but they go jogging, etc. Everywhere one recycles lost faculties, or lost bodies, or lost sociality, or the lost taste for food. One reinvents penury, asceticism, vanished savage naturalness: natural food, health food, yoga. Marshall Sahlins's idea that it is the economy of the market, and not of nature at all, that secretes penury, is verified, but at a secondary level: here, in the sophisticated confines of a triumphal market economy is reinvented a penury/sign, a penury/simulacrum, a simulated behavior of the underdeveloped (including the adoption of Marxist tenets) that, in the guise of ecology, of energy crises and the critique of capital, adds a final esoteric aureole to the triumph of an esoteric culture. Nevertheless, maybe a mental catastrophe, a mental implosion and involution without precedent lies in wait for a system of this kind, whose visible signs would be those of this strange obesity, or the incredible coexistence of the most bizarre theories and practices, which correspond to the improbable coalition of luxury, heaven, and money, to the improbable luxurious materialization of life and to undiscoverable contradictions.
    http://www.egs.edu/faculty/jean-baud...-of-simulacra/

  7. #7
    Global Moderator Polemarch's Avatar
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    I can see how/why this was referenced in The Matrix.

    That passage is so pithy, I find myself unsure whether it said far too much or far too little. If I had to sum up what I just read - it seems to boil down to the idea that Disneyland (and places like it) exist to provide escape from the dehumanization of modern life.
    We didn't land on Plymouth Rock. Plymouth Rock landed on us.

  8. #8
    NC-17 Delilah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wise fool View Post
    *boatload of words*
    I already believe the adults are elsewhere. I don't need a skinny dude in green tights to remind me to act like a child.
    You're using big words right now that you don't know the meaning of and you're capitalizing them. You shouldn't do that. ~Osito

  9. #9
    Senior Member skip's Avatar
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    It's fun.

    Do you really need more than that?

    It's fun: roller coasters, flume rides, parades, riverboats, musicals, dinosaurs, churros, horse-drawn street cars, Indiana Jones, steam locomotives, pirates, monorails, lightsaber duels, barbershop quartets, ghosts, trips to Endor's moon, fireworks, dining in exclusive clubs, etc. It's just fun.

    It's culture.

    For those of us lucky enough to grew up near it, the park doesn't represent a vacation destination or tourist trap, it's part of our home: family visits, birthday parties, dates, school performances, Grad Nites, weddings, employment. You meet friends for lunch and a ride or two, critique premieres of new shows and parades, hold your sister's baby as she rides Space Mountain for the first time since she got pregnant, sit in your favorite shady corner of Tom Sawyer Island to decompress after a long day at work, enjoy line-free rides on a rainy day, go to lectures by Tony Baxter (who is a CSULB alum and speaks as part of the alumi speakers series), etc. If we didn't work there in high school or college we always knew someone who did. We'd get inside information on restaurant and show changes, wave to kids we knew in shows and parades, etc.

    It's history.

    It's not just business history, southern California history and U.S. history, it's personal history. As an INTP kid you naturally live mostly in your own head, then someone takes stuff from your inside world and makes it real so you can walk around and interact with it and so can everyone else around you. That adds up to powerful early childhood experiences that make lasting connections. Finally being tall enough to ride the Matterhorn or Splash Mountain, or drive the Autopia car by yourself, those are childhood milestones. Getting your first annual pass is a rite of passage.

    It's change.

    Two days at the park are never alike. The cast changes, shows change, attractions change, flora and fauna change, holidays come and go, even the guests (customers) change: it's a different experience when the guests are predominately locals as opposed to tourists (there are benefits to both experiences). It's different every single time, that keeps it interesting.

    Now, people who collect Disney everything and just love Mickey Mouse... that I don't get that, either. But you asked about the park(s).
    Last edited by skip; 03-12-2014 at 05:12 AM.
    Yes, I smell like a horse. No, I don't consider that a problem.

  10. #10
    ..you don't know me LordLatch's Avatar
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    What about Club 33? Also no churros for me. I'm watching my girlish figure.
    This just in: I'm accepting all friend requests too unless you're a fricken jerk and I can't stand your existence and inane drivel. If that's the case, then I'll accept your friend request so I can keep an eye on your ass unless you don't hold any interest for me; then only the threat of keeping my eye on you stands. feces

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