Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 36

Thread: humility from science

  1. #1
    libertine librarian sandwitch's Avatar
    Type
    intp
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    flyover territory
    Posts
    1,356

    humility from science

    The fact that political debate entered the discussion regarding the Cosmos reboot indicates that many people are missing the point. I haven't seen the new rendition yet, does it still convey the greatness and vastness of the universe?



    I love that they captured this man's humility. He's pioneered amazing research, but all these years suspected that maybe he only wanted to believe it "because it was beautiful."



    I need to go stargazing soon.

  2. #2
    Tawaci ki a Gnaska ki Osito Polar's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    San Francisco, New California Republic
    Posts
    2,068
    Yes. It's very well done and amazing to watch. It really captures the magnificence of its subject matter. I'm psyched that it has the same effect on the young person I've been living with that it had on me at that age. It's on TV here just after his bedtime and he begs to trade doing extra homework in exchange for being allowed to stay up a little later to watch it. Some of the science goes completely over his head, but he loves watching it in part because the production value is so slick.

    So far it led to some good discussions. He asked me about what a black hole is, and he was very interested in the evolution of dogs and the evolutionary mechanics of the eye.
    Last edited by Osito Polar; 03-19-2014 at 10:44 PM.
    "I don't have psychological problems." --Madrigal

    "When you write about shooting Polemarch in the head, that's more like a first-person view, like you're there looking down the sight of the gun." --Utisz

    David Wong, regarding Chicago
    Six centuries ago, the pre-Colombian natives who settled here named this region with a word which in their language means "the Mouth of Shadow". Later, the Iroquois who showed up and inexplicably slaughtered every man, woman and child renamed it "Seriously, Fuck that Place". When French explorer Jacques Marquette passed through the area he marked his map with a drawing of a brownish blob emerging from between the Devil's buttocks.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Starjots's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    1,754
    The first few episodes of the original Cosmos were the heavy hitters to me, Sagan's way of putting things was and still is as much poetry as science. I've had the series on DVD but never got all the way through - the science part was just too old.

    So far the new series has been good, the second episode better than the first. The first episode spends a lot of time on Giordano Bruno who was just a mystic - appealing but not really someone who added knowledge. A small quibble, and it got stacked up the best episode in the original series. The second episode dives into life and inner space though and was great, quite fun to watch. I'm looking forward to the rest of the series.

    Sagan dwelt a lot on nuclear catastrophe and the interesting future if we could survive that. Tyson's politics are suitably updated, he seems to aim much more squarely at ignorance/superstition vs knowledge and exploration. He's not as heavy handed nor as poetic as Sagan, but I think he's doing a really good job.

    Alas, so far no kidlings are watching with me. Maybe I can get them to watch the replays.

  4. #4
    Now we know... Asteroids Champion ACow's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    2,267
    I need to go stargazing soon.
    I get severely depressed every now and then when I realise that stargazing is almost impossible if you live in a moderately large city, and that's where most of the human population are. The air and light pollution are so bad, you look up at the heavens now and you don't get filled with wonder, you just see slight brown murk with a few glints here and there.

    I wonder if it has any effect. I always thought that looking up and being able to physically see the milky way at night always gave a mixture of inspiration/humility/wonder...and its increasingly gone for more and more children now

  5. #5
    Member
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Upstate, New York, U.S. of A. -- Earth
    Posts
    648
    Quote Originally Posted by ACow View Post
    I get severely depressed every now and then when I realise that stargazing is almost impossible if you live in a moderately large city, and that's where most of the human population are. The air and light pollution are so bad, you look up at the heavens now and you don't get filled with wonder, you just see slight brown murk with a few glints here and there.

    I wonder if it has any effect. I always thought that looking up and being able to physically see the milky way at night always gave a mixture of inspiration/humility/wonder...and its increasingly gone for more and more children now
    Alas, I was spoiled as a child by spending much time on the dairy farm of my maternal grandparents located around 10 miles from Cooperstown, NY ... which was too small to produce much light pollution.
    The night sky was splendid and awe inspiring.

    Though I've gotten used to city people and attitudes fostered while living in cities and suburbs my formative years have resulted in me having a stronger connection with natural life in the troposphere and The Cosmos enlightening me in the most natural of ways.
    Last edited by gps; 03-19-2014 at 11:23 PM.

  6. #6
    Member
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    gone
    Posts
    920
    Get out of the city, far out, and look up on a clear night. That vast, broad swath of fuzzy light is the Milky Way, and it's amazing, beautiful and awe-inspiring. Van Gough got it right with "Starry Night."

  7. #7
    Senior Member Starjots's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    1,754

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Starjots View Post
    The first few episodes of the original Cosmos were the heavy hitters to me, Sagan's way of putting things was and still is as much poetry as science. I've had the series on DVD but never got all the way through - the science part was just too old.

    So far the new series has been good, the second episode better than the first. The first episode spends a lot of time on Giordano Bruno who was just a mystic - appealing but not really someone who added knowledge. A small quibble, and it got stacked up the best episode in the original series. The second episode dives into life and inner space though and was great, quite fun to watch. I'm looking forward to the rest of the series.

    Sagan dwelt a lot on nuclear catastrophe and the interesting future if we could survive that. Tyson's politics are suitably updated, he seems to aim much more squarely at ignorance/superstition vs knowledge and exploration. He's not as heavy handed nor as poetic as Sagan, but I think he's doing a really good job.

    Alas, so far no kidlings are watching with me. Maybe I can get them to watch the replays.
    As someone who watched the original series, I wasn't expecting much but I think they've done a good job. I do think the second episode felt a little dumbed down in comparison but I think that's done in an effort to get through to america's knuckleheads and while I endorse promoting critical thought and sending religion to the grave, the bruno part felt a little ham-fisted and drawn out.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Makers!*'s Avatar
    Type
    XXXX
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Blackfeet Country
    Posts
    1,499
    Science has only depressed my lately, as most of what I've read has not concerned the wonderment of new discoverys, but everything we've done to destroy the earth. One generation from now, I may not even be able to instruct my children, should I have them, on how to fish the local rivers, because they will be too warm to sustain trout. Though I guess the ecosystem's rejection of our attempts to manipulate it is most humblying, I wish it weren't so.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Starjots's Avatar
    Type
    INTP
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    1,754

Similar Threads

  1. Science microthreads
    By ferrus in forum Math, Science & Tech
    Replies: 475
    Last Post: 06-28-2017, 10:13 PM
  2. Science Puzzles
    By OrionzRevenge in forum Math, Science & Tech
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 04-15-2015, 06:48 PM
  3. Fortean Science Thread -- Bigfoot, UFOs & Strange Phenomena
    By Osito Polar in forum Math, Science & Tech
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 02-17-2014, 07:22 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •