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Thread: I just saw...

  1. #1951
    Shiny and Eww Charde's Avatar
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    I thought thematically Blade Runner 2049 built off the first movie and went full-circle. I felt like Robin Wright was the weakest written role in the film and almost didn't belong, while the rest was more solid. The scene with Joe and Joi with Mariette (the prostitute -- heh, note her name, which is very close to another word that conveys her purpose in that scene) was mesmerizing.

    Coming from something I wrote when I saw the film....

    The beauty of the film is its dependence on the humanity of some major "artificial" characters; there's such a great plot twist near the end that breaks trope [I refer to the reveal about Joe] and is exactly why the movie conveys its major premise, of considering whether replicants (and other forms of life, like the Joi AI) should be considered "people". It is primarily in its denial of the trope(s) and how the characters respond that reinforces in fact that they ARE... and the last shots of K aka Joe in the movie tie beautifully to Hauer's famous improvised line "like tears in the rain" from the first film.
    There is definitely a tonal difference between the two (as well as stimulation/input, I think the first film is more kinetic while the second is more consistent with large open vacuous areas... the future exists and it's EMPTY rather than NOISY). Like, really, it's all open space, even the closed scenes inside buildings; the first film feels more claustrophobic. One is a faster burn, the other a far slower burn and contemplative. So it's understandable that maybe the audiences aren't synonymous but merely overlapping, and fans of either might not appreciate the other as much.

    -----------------

    Most of the stuff I watched this past weekend was like fast food. I'll give "fast food" kudos to the Jumanji sequel, which is fluff but low-key enjoyable and with an occasional moment on unexpected depth although really being a mediocre Friday night "hang out with friends" film. It's also one of those rare films where the trailer actually does reflect the film itself, tonally and content-wise.

    I tried to watch Inisidious: The Final Key and might try again later, but the copy I had wasn't a great one and damn it is boring for a "horror" movie. The first film was a bit above average but seemed to allow room to improve... and then each film after just has been a step down. I did watch Coco, which was a huge step up despite not being in my top rank of Pixar films -- but the production quality was amazing, and it's really the storytelling nuance that keeps Pixar in the front of the pack; I had found The Book of Life (2-3 years ago), similar themes, enjoyable and possessing moments of pathos, but Coco makes both the characterization and the plotline more complex in good ways, so you come away feeling like you were acquainted with real people and not more fable-style figures.

    Last night I tried to watch Netflix's 1922, which I finally had to turn off and go to bed; if you felt like Blade Runner 2049 was slow, you'll probably hate this film. There are actual moments that leap out of you (like Wilf looking down the well the first time... jesus), and the movie seems to actually follow King's novella pretty darn closely. But it's just a slow burn and not really that mesmerizing. Thomas Jane has a really heavy Midwest accent, whereas Molly Parker's accent seems clumsy and the other characters not much accent either... Is this just a flaw in the film, or a way to accent Wilf as a man of the rural earth? Anyway, while at least being a faithful adaptation of a King work (something often not seen), it's not exactly a King work that I had much interest in revisiting. I guess I will finish it later tonight but despite forgetting the story now, I'm pretty sure I know how it will end. I think the "Gerald's Game" adaptation was actually stronger in the fact it could hold a lot more interest and still also did follow the book.
    Last edited by Charde; 03-12-2018 at 02:36 PM.

  2. #1952
    Senior Member Sinny's Avatar
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    I recently watched Assassins Creed (2016) and the new X-Files series.

    I'd skipped over watching Creed before because it's always listed right next to some "B-line" sci-fis, and being a fan of the game franchise I didn't want to be disappointed.
    But my cousin put this on when we we're hungover. The slow pace suited us at the time

    It was a bit slow, but I didn't mind at all, already being a fan of the franchise, I'm already immersed in the story - and I was enjoying the real life take on it. I enjoyed watching Michael Fassbender as the lead. - Things took a dramatic turn for the worst during the last 30 minutes though, when not much of anything really happened at all - action or dialogue. It's failed to impress on a wider scale, and now the franchise will probably never be completed on screen. This annoys me.

    The X-Files are brilliant, utter class. Quite comedic, but done really well. Their conspiracies are completely current, which is no surprise to me at all, because their producers work closely with DOD interests, and it's the DOD who are responsible for much of the conspiratorial sub-culture (Roswell, UFO, Aliens hybrids) - the DOD have created their own franchise, and the final products are quite impressive. David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson are as good as ever together... and another young couple of FBI investigagtors have been introduced as the next fledgling Mulder & Scully, Liz Einstein and Kyd Miller

    Even if conspiricies aren't your thing, I highly recommened season 11 Episode 7 - Rm9sbG93ZXJz
    http://www.imdb.com/list/ls021550765/


    When Tech Attacks



    If you watched this week’s X-Files and you’re reading this on a smart phone or tablet, I applaud your bravery.

    Because the overarching theme of the episode is that artificial intelligence — via smartphones/smartcars/smarthouses and the like — will probably kill us all in our sleep the moment it is able.

    Vampire Slayer‘s “Hush” in its ability to convey both creepiness and humor without relying on speech. Also, any ep that uses the concept of Scully’s self-pleasuring as a recurring motif? Aces in my book.

    Read on for the highlights of “Rm9sbG9eZX.Jz.”

    The X Files Recap Season 11 Episode 7SOMETHING’S FISHY | After a cold open that informs us about some artificial intelligence that started out as a sweet, naïve being but turned into a racist garbage pile thanks to Twitter, we encounter Mulder and Scully waiting for some food in Forowa, a sushi restaurant that’s entirely devoid of other people. Like, no waiters, no other customers, nothing. They order via digital menu, then tool around on their phones while waiting for the food to arrive. They don’t say much of anything to each other, which seems odd… until I realize how often my husband and I sit on the couch next to each other, silent, each engrossed in the iPhone in our paws. Touché, X-Files. Did I mention Scully has bobbed her hair? She has. I like it.

    After Scully gets a push notification asking her to “friend” the restaurant on social media (she declines), her meal arrives and looks normal. Mulder’s, however, is a slimy, whole blobfish on a plate. Scully giggles as she snaps a pic, but when Mulder goes into the kitchen to talk to someone about the mixup, all he finds are robots at work prepping the food. They seem to pause when he walks in, then resume their tasks as he uneasily backs out.

    Since Scully’s just about done and Mulder’s apparently not getting anything other than the blobfish, he sticks his credit card into an automated system to pay. But when he chooses not to tip, the system won’t let his card go. He bangs on the counter, but that only seems to anger the restaurant, which extinguishes its lights and announces that all of the doors are locked. They’re trapped until Scully jiggles the lock with a well-placed chopstick, and they escape. But Mulder’s credit card, he realizes, is still inside.

    NOTICING A TREND?
    Those who begin coercive elimination of dissent soon find themselves exterminating dissenters. Compulsory unification of opinion achieves only the unanimity of the graveyard.

    ~ Robert Jackson, Statesman (1892-1954)


  3. #1953
    TJ TeresaJ's Avatar
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    Kubo of the Two Threads

    Gorgeous film. Solid story. Somewhat interesting characters. Most elements of the film were quite evocative, but it made the major mistake of then explicitly telling what everything means in the dialog, so there are no layers to the film whatsoever. Everything is spelled out for you, and the pace is rushed.

    Very... American storytelling, wrapped up in a facade of Japanese spirit horror story. Lovingly neo-orientalist (dare I say it) in a similar way to Avatar: the Last Airbender, but compressed into a single film and even more show and tell.

    Good for older children, too scary for my four year old, disappointing and frustrating to watch as an adult.
    Last edited by TeresaJ; 03-13-2018 at 08:31 PM.

  4. #1954
    tsuj a notelpmis QuickTwist's Avatar
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    But your individuality and your present need will be swept away by change,
    and what you now ardently desire will one day become the object of abhorrence.
    ~ Schiller - 'Psychological Types'

  5. #1955
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    a bit strange guy

  6. #1956
    TJ TeresaJ's Avatar
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    I was supposed to go to sleep early last night, but instead....

    Too bad, Lady Une. You were far too lenient.
    As a soldier, yes. But as a civilian I lived an austere life.

  7. #1957
    Senior Member Spartan26's Avatar
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    Isle of Dogs – Latest offering by Wes Anderson. In the relatively near future, a disease has taken over the country of Japan, afflicting much of the canine population. To prevent the risk of the disease contaminating humans, all dogs are sent to a desolate island, now used as dump site, to live out their days. A young boy of means flies to the island where he meets up with a small pack who join him in search of his lost dog.

    If you didn’t know or didn’t guess by the nature of the premise, it’s a stop motion animated flick. Think Fantastic Mr Fox. Only, don’t. While Isle of Dogs is much more theatrical in terms of spectacle, music and plot, Mr Fox has more heart. A film about a boy in search of his lost dog seems like a film for kids but it’s hardly suitable for younger audience. Language isn’t an issue but there are some mature themes. I found it rather slow in pacing, which, yes, is his trademark, but this film lacked the curiosity factor that might otherwise hold someone fascinated with what all was going on.

    Premise and backstory are laid out simply enough but it’s somewhat of a layered, complex film. Plenty of parallels with today’s world. Plenty of places when it talked about the treatment of dogs and what to do with them, you’d be hard pressed not to substitute Muslim with dog. Conspiracy theories, corrupt elections, misinformation to the masses, fear mongering, it was all there. But, it wasn’t a heavy film in that sense. In fact, there was almost a mocking tone to the plight of those today in real life taking up battle against the aforementioned ills of today’s society.

    Plenty of voices you’ll recognize like Ed Norton, Bill Murray, Jeff Goldblum. Some voices not as distinguishable but plenty famous like Scar Jo and France McD. I thought Bryan Cranston was a bit too heavy handed at times. Structurally, it segmented like most of Wes’ films. Appearance is arresting. My props to how they did and didn’t go translations. That was really well thought out. I’m not one of those people who reacts much to the mistreatment of animals in films, plenty able to separate out that it’s not real, and yet, I found this a little bleak at times. I think I assumed too light a tone or endearing of a film. This is not to say that I found it to be a major letdown. Glad I saw it. At some point I’d watch it again on TV. But this won’t be one that I’d purchase to pop in from time to time just to examine the craft or re-live the experience.

  8. #1958
    unbeknownst Lilith's Avatar
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    ^ Interesting.

    Jumanji

    A for Amusing. Good movie to watch when you’re looking for some laughs. Kevin Hart is the shit. He voiced a couple of animation characters I’ve watched last year and I can’t get them off my head when I hear and watch him open his mouth lol.
    We cling to our past as if they define us. What we do defines us.

  9. #1959
    Tsundoku LordLatch's Avatar
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    I think the lighting could have been better.
    Stand clear of the closing doors, please.

  10. #1960
    TJ TeresaJ's Avatar
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    I found myself binge watching States of Undress the other night.

    This might be one of the most well-done Western POV on global issues documentary series I've ever seen. It seems like Hailey Gates should legitimately get an investigative journalist award for this. She manages to open-minded, even-keeled, and fearless, even while holding on firmly to her own perspective and her own values. She asks really penetrating, direct questions while withholding judgement.

    I've seen maybe four or five episodes, and so far there's been exactly one moment where it felt like she was unable to even imagine the other person's perspective. That was when she was interviewing a man who had thrown acid on his wife and then divorced her because she kept wearing "modern" clothing, and he felt like a laughingstock in his village. Gates didn't seem to get the concept that a woman is not a person in some cultures so much as she is a living embodiment of her family's honor. I reject the premise of that philosophy, but given that that is the assumption, I could see how the man and his family felt justified in his actions. Gates didn't seem to even glimpse that. She seemed very very tense.

    But that was the one exception. In every other scene she's been unflappable in situations that would certainly throw me for a loop. I love how she acknowledged feeling very uncomfortable in interviewing the extremist imam, but then the interview went very well anyway (until his wife shut it down). She was extremely gracious with the young man and his mother undergoing somewhat sketchy plastic surgery in Venezuela. And the Palestine episode very much echoed what my own experiences had been, a foreigner crossing through invisible borders that are impassable to the locals.

    Every episode I've seen so far (Pakistan, Venezuela, Russia, China, Palestine, DRC) has been utterly fascinating. I'd be interested to know if it's equally fascinating to people who might be less... demographically similar... to the host.

    Oh, and as for the premise... Fashion is really just the entryway into an exploration of culture. Each episode is like 5% fashion and 95% culture/economics/politics.

    EDIT: Oh wait, they're not free on youtube anymore???
    Too bad, Lady Une. You were far too lenient.
    As a soldier, yes. But as a civilian I lived an austere life.

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