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Thread: Programmer's Den

  1. #171
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    today a coworker pull requested code he'd been working on for a week, and when resolving the conflicts between what already existed (mine), and his, he chose to just delete all mine . "I didn't know what code needed to stay. But you can tell me now, and we'll add it back in." me: "I think you need to revert this and do the pull request again... [i.e. get it right from the beginning, rather than hack it back together again after you've deleted it all]".

  2. #172
    unbeknownst Lilith's Avatar
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    Interested in reading everyone’s thoughts about Microsoft acquiring GitHub.

    Is it the death of open source? What do you think is the motive behind the acquisition?

  3. #173
    know nothing pensive_pilgrim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilith View Post
    Is it the death of open source?
    Of course not. Was github the birth of open source?

  4. #174
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
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    I think there will be an exodus. But I'm not surprised by the move--at least not on Microsoft's end. I was surprised at the signs Microsoft was using Github at my last interview on a Microsoft campus. It makes sense they'd want to acquire it if they've chosen dependency on it.

    I don't believe they're dedicated to open source as anything other than a way to steal though. It's Microsoft. I'll revise that view if and when they open up Windows.
    Most of time, when people ask why something terrible happened, they don't realize they are looking for someone to blame.

    --Meditations on Uncertainty Vol ξ(x)

  5. #175
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    I think the "microsoft is shit" thing is outdated. They actually pump out a lot of cool things. Of course they charge for some of it, because they're a business. They also do quite a lot for the development community. The whole .net collection of stuff is excellent.

    As a software/whatever business, they need to pull in as many programmers to their stuff as possible, so that programmers learn the .net languages. That's why there are now good free versions of their visual studio software (which is damn good actually). (pretty much the only difference between the free and paid version is something like inability to generate object class diagrams or something, that you don't really do anyway, and I think they take away "team foundation" integration or whatever it is, and you really don't want to use that anyway .... so it's the same)

    They've invested in making .net core run on any system in addition to windows. (so they're not stuck to just iis servers, I think would be the main driving factor)

    They also make visual studio code that is totally open source and fairly unanimously the best text editor around at the moment. (maybe this is a token effort, to show people "see, microsoft does open source". but... it does indicate that they know people value that, so they've adapted themselves)

    They also, I think, fairly heavily are behind the pluralsight programming site, which I think absolutely blows away all competition (lynda, coursera, etc) in video programming courses for programmers, due to far greater consistency of quality. This further shows their support for programmer culture generally.

    They will keep charging the end consumer for their stuff. But it really makes sense that they will make it as easy as possible for programmers to use their stuff as they want to (free etc).

    They'll never be as open source as some other philanthropic ventures like ubuntu or whatever. But I think it's completely unrealistic to expect they would. And for what they are they provide a lot of great things that could not otherwise exist.

    I think there's a 60% chance github stays the same or they make it slightly better somehow. ~25% chance they fuck it up somehow (~15% to "something else"). In the "fuck it up" case it won't matter too much. Something new would be created and everyone would move on. (just for starters, I know AWS would love to jump into this nook... I think they call it "CodeCommit", and thus far everyone says "why would anyone use this over github!"...)

    So I don't really care that much.

    ----

    On the other hand, away from the "microsoft is shit" thing, there should definitely be some effects on their existing products, like TFS that everyone seems to hate. I've only used it briefly, and it seemed pretty shit. Hopefully they would just overhaul that completely and replace it with some github stuff. I don't know how much the features/scope overlap, and so how relevant it will be. But... I think that would be the main result of this. Try to slow down the escape of people away from that TFS thing by making it not shit, or... I guess just now also owning the place many ran to to escape.

  6. #176
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scarydoor View Post
    I think the "microsoft is shit" thing is outdated. They actually pump out a lot of cool things. Of course they charge for some of it, because they're a business.
    Like what? Windows 10? It's shit. Office 365? They took their best office suite and turned it into a shitty bleached asshole. They're utter shit and if I weren't software bound I'd dump them like the trash they are. All their design choices since 2008 have been complete and utter rubbish.

    Edit: without getting into the specifics of the quagmire that is bloat, obfuscation, bad patch practices, and integrated spyware--I think we have reverse halo effect biases in play. You find value in .net and therefore turn a blind eye to what shits in my cereal, and I have never had need or use for .net beyond the shortest path through it to a winform. Consequently any value it might have for you is nonexistent for me so it's ignored in my assessment of Microsoft.

    I'm pretty sure you are also at least a decade younger than I am so many of the things I find offensive you probably see as normal where for me they represent negative change.
    Last edited by Hephaestus; 06-06-2018 at 05:45 PM.
    Most of time, when people ask why something terrible happened, they don't realize they are looking for someone to blame.

    --Meditations on Uncertainty Vol ξ(x)

  7. #177
    schlemiel Faust's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus View Post
    Like what?
    Typescript

    Agreed on the Windows progression.
    "All my heroes are dead" - John Zorn

    "It's not selfish if you hate yourself"

  8. #178
    Meae Musae Servus Hephaestus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faust View Post
    Typescript

    Agreed on the Windows progression.
    I'm not that into JS--I hate html/CSS right now but that could just be because of how not suited to me udacity's courses are--but I'm not certain another giant extension is what JS needs.

    I'll meet you halfway with C#. I'll take it half back by singling out Anders Hejlsberg for credit for it--Wikipedia tells me he helped with Typescript as well--and close the gap by half again, acknowledging hiring Anders was a great move.

    We can call it the "3/8ths Compromise".
    Most of time, when people ask why something terrible happened, they don't realize they are looking for someone to blame.

    --Meditations on Uncertainty Vol ξ(x)

  9. #179
    Senior Member Tetris Champion notdavidlynch's Avatar
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    Show me your big fat view controllers.

    /feeling dirty

  10. #180
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    ^ anyone using gitlab? I've just checked it out. Seems like a like-for-like replacement to github but also with a few additional nice features, e.g. private repositories for free accounts.

    ----

    This is a bit of a random thought: working as a programmer, the daily routine is a thick stream of "how can I do this? -> use this. What's the way to set this properly?" It becomes fairly noisy and if I don't use the new knowledge again regularly, then it becomes a bit of a memory blur. I might forget I did something like that entirely. And sometimes when in the process of figuring things out, your limited memory can slow you down. I'm trying to see what is the best way to fix these problems, and not just a random diversion that has no practical value. I think that ideally we should be able to record our experiences in a searchable database. E.g. so you could search for some key words and track back into problems you've already solved to kind of get a head start. Obviously a problem with this is that it needs to be practical; something you use, and is easy/convenient to use - otherwise you will not use it. I was thinking you could hook up one of the google apps to help with this, since it provides a lot of the hard work in building up an interface, and provides the APIs to retrieve things *. However, I think I've settled on that making a markdown file for each day is a good approach. You can work on it locally, make it look reasonably okay, and is better for editing etc. I don't know if there's a way to link that into a database somehow to enable searching of contents. Just in general though, I'm now finding this a pretty good way to go about my work for the day. I have a markdown file for each day where I list a bunch of things I want to do, and then progressively add a few notes inside each section about problems, and how I solved them. Explicitly stating what the current problem is, is also very helpful in just directing what I should focus on. And it's a good way to assist memory, generally, by recording random things you find, so you don't need to duplicate the experience, e.g. "the stuff I need to modify is in this file, at c:/skl/something" when you're dealing with a project that contains 73 separate complex solutions inside.

    * actually I made a basic poc where our front-end site pulls down a table of values from google sheets at run time, as a stand-in for a full, bloated cms. It has huge potential for poc and customers who want to mess with the text or other annoying things all the time.

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